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Thread: What Do You Think the Cause Could Be?

  1. #1

    Default What Do You Think the Cause Could Be?

    Hi Everyone - how is everyone enjoying their New Year?

    I am interested in getting some views on a situation that has developed with Ollie. The vet has prescribed Clomicalm for what we think might be an anxiety issue.

    Over the past month we have been very busy, dinners and such, you know the ususal christmas crazyness. We do also ensure we make time for the dogs and ensure they get their walk and not left alone unless absolutely necessary. We have even started taking them out where we know it will not be a problem. Anyway Ollie has started pooing and weeing in the house if we leave him and penny alone. But the thing is he doesnt do it while we are out he does it after we come home and have gone to bed. When we go out to work etc during the day we leave the pups outside. We let them have access to the house at night so that they don't just bark at possums and shadows.

    Part of me was even wondering if its attention seeking, but that would be pretty extreme for a dog wouldnt it???? Any views?
    Vellela

  2. #2
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    Where has he been going to the toilet? Near the back door? (just needs to go) Or in the middle of your bed? (attention seeking/anxiety)

    What do you do when you find the mess? Do you scold the dog or rub his nose in it (bad), or just quietly clean up ignoring the dog (using vinegar and bicarb soda or meths, not bleach).

    What is the dog's pre bedtime routine?

    Do you feed him at night, does he get water? how long before bed time?

    Before bed time do you take him outside - do you see him go to the toilet? Or do you go back in without checking. Do you have a "go to the toilet" cue word? Like "Go Toilet"?

    What did the vet say? What questions did they ask?

    I've had a few late nights recently myself and sometimes it would mean I fed the dog after we got home around 9:30pm or later, and that would result in late night/early morning dog need to go to toilet.

    You need to make sure no food (or water depending) after four hours before bed time. Ie if bed time is 10:30pm - no food or water after 6:30pm. Or dog will need to go out in the middle of the night.

  3. #3

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    Hi Hyacinth

    Thanks for reply. We make sure that he is fed well before bedtime for that very reason. He doesnt wee or poo anywhere near my bed or his bed. Its a bit weird but he has two preferred spots generally at either ends of the dining/lounge, near the windows...I wonder if maybe something outside is frightening him?

    The weird thing is it only seems to be happening after we have been out. Last night he wee'd whilst I was out but the poo happened this morning. The poo always seems to happen whilst we are in bed.

    Something that was different last night was that I left at lunch time, fed them, plenty of water and bone and didnt get back to 1.00am (naughty girls had a hens night - have headache to proove it!). I always try to leave tv or radio plus light on and forgot yesterday, Also my sister slept over instead of OH...maybe that stressed him out!
    Vellela

  4. #4
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    Vellela

    Have I got this straight, you fed them just before you left at lunch time - say 12noon ish, and you didn't get back to let them out till 1am?

    That would be a hard stretch for a dog looking for a doggy break around 4pm ish.

    Or you left them outside till 1am? and he did a poo inside this morning before you got up? Did you get up later than usual? Would you consider getting up a little earlier and standing over him until he's done? And then praise and the magic word?

    Frosty sometimes won't go unless I stay outside with her. And sometimes in the mornings she tries to save it up for when we go to the oval. And then she practically explodes so she can be right on her holding it in limit if I get up late, even if I opened the back door for her on time and went back to bed for snooze in.

    Also I forgot to ask and you haven't said if you take him out before bed time and stay out with him to make sure he goes. Eg dinner before 6:30pm, bed time at 10:30pm, toilet time at 10:15pm and stay out there until you get a number 1 and 2. This is when having a magic word / cue word really helps.

  5. #5

    Default

    They werent locked in the house all that time, they have access to the back yard through the doggy door - they can come and go as they please. This might sound strange but we have never really had to take them outside, they both just tend to do it we brush our teeth ready for bed, its part of the household routine.

    The other thing is that, and this sounds grose, but its always a runny poo never a hard one, thats what makes me think he is stressed or perhaps frightened....afterall he doesnt know my sister all that well....
    Vellela

  6. #6
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    Hi vellela

    But it doesn't only happen when your sister is there?

    Yes upset routines and strange people can result in stress and that can result in runny poo.

    I find runny poo is most often caused by eating something a doggy shouldn't. Or dodgy dog biscuits. I changed Frosty's dog biscuits and no more runny poo - even on days when she was stressed (didn't eat the treats I left out for her).

    If you're worried that your sister stresses your dog, you can try getting her to feed him roast chicken or some treat he loves. If he takes it from her, she doesn't stress him, and he will associate her with good things. If she does frighten him, he won't take food from her. Don't try to force the issue though. You can feed him the chicken and that will still help him associate your sister with "good things".

    Also runny poo - tends to come on quick and it may be he just wasn't fast enough to get out. But I'd be looking all through the back yard (and house) for things a doggy shouldn't eat, like possum poo, koala poo (almost pure eucalyptus oil and bound to fire straight though a dog), wandering dew (bad ground creeper plant with small white flowers and shiny green leaves), cat poo, compost, lawn clippings, neighbours bbq bones, lamb bones, etc etc.

    I've had neighbours and crows drop bones into the garden from bbqs. Crows are a bit hard to stop but either way, a good talk to the neighbours about putting their bones in the bin is a start. If it's you that has had the bbq, next time choose food that doesn't have bones or skewers - but you would have mentioned a party at your place?

  7. #7

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    The possum poo is an interesting one.....he loves that!

    I guess only time will tell. Might keep him on the Clomicalm until he has finished the bottle and see what happens. They may only be little but they sure are complicated little creatures.
    Vellela

  8. #8
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    I find my dog is fairly simple to figure out compared to people.

    Though I'm still working out how to get her to do what I want more often instead of the other way round - she's got me well trained. Off to open the back door for her now. Doggy door - I wish. Need new door frame and door and screen door first.

  9. #9
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    Perhaps try going back to basics as though he was a puppy, taking him out to the toilet etc, make sure the area he has soiled is cleaned thoroughly.

    Cut back on the love meter and start building this little guys confidence. He needs periods of time when he is locked outside, when you are home and when you are out. I won't go into detail as there are plenty of books & websites on it & I'm not sure if I understood all the details of your post.

  10. #10

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    I agree with Mouseandchicken- go back to the basics. I would be wary of resorting to medication for what is clearly a behavioural problem

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