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Thread: Chewing and Pulling on the Lead.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Australia
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    Default Chewing and Pulling on the Lead.

    Hi, Isaac (my dog ) is pulling on his lead when ever we try to walk him and he also try's chewing the lead while we are walking. I'm just wondering if anyone has any suggestions about how I could stop this?? It feels like I'm buy a new lead every two weeks.
    My dog is my best friend and helps me though those hard days.
    ♥Isaac♥Bronson♥Pepper♥
    ♥Animals♥

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,651

    Default

    For starters - get a horse lead - a nice thick rope that takes a while to chew through. They're often cheaper than those webbing things anyway. Between $5 and $10 should get you one. $12 is a rip off from the dog supplies shop...

    Also get a small rope bone toy. Try to swap the lead for this any time your dog grabs the lead.

    You could also consider getting a front attach harness like these to stop (the power of) the pulling. Note that harnesses that attach at the back are useful as sled harnesses and do not stop a dog from pulling.
    Dog Harness, Dog Training Supplies | Sense-ible and Sense-ation Dog Harness

    And then there is the training technique which involves making sure your dog gets zero gain from pulling. Eg assuming your dog is keen to go for a walk (my dog is just weird about this) - the minute the dog starts to pull (or grabs the lead) you MUST STOP walking. As soon as the dog stops pulling (and sits), take ONE step. If dog doesn't pull, take another step. As soon as dog starts pulling again - STOP and repeat.

    This is really tedious for the first week or so, but depending on how keen your dog is to go for a walk and get somewhere, and how bright he is and how consistent you are - the dog will learn not to pull. You might feel you are depriving dog of exercise, but the mental effort and frustration of not getting anywhere will be exhausting for the dog, as well as you.

    Depending how food motivated your dog is - you can also teach him to heel. Hold a treat in your hand over the spot where you want your dog to heel... I have dog on left, next to my left leg and hold lead with both hands, and treat with right hand over my left hip. To improve the heel and decrease the pulling - I take several quick steps and stop suddenly and the dog only gets the treat if she's in the right place. If she's not, I take a couple of steps back then forwards, bringing her back into the right place and then I stop and she gets the treat. So she learns where the right place is.

    Do talk to your dog and let him know "good dog" when he's doing what you want. I also use a gentle toned "uh uh" to let my dog know when she's not doing what I want.

    I am afraid I use my lead as a rope tug toy as well because I have a hard enough time getting her on lead at all, that I want her to enjoy being on lead. But when we're trying to get from A to B - I don't allow her to grab the lead. I tell her "uh uh" and she lets go and I tell her good dog, and treat when she's walking nicely.

    I know that might seem inconsistent but dogs can learn the difference between "working" and "playing". You can even use these words as "cues" to swap between one mode and the other.

    "heel" is supposedly the hardest thing for a dog to get right. When you're at home, you can practice with the food and without the lead. Use the food as a lure to get position right.

    There is loads of stuff on the web about how to get your dog to learn it. And the main reason for a nice heel - is to stop the pulling.

    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    Questions & Ansvers from Turid Rugaas

  3. #3

    Default

    You know I never believed people who said their dog was a puller, always thought their dog wasn't trained properly, until I got my girl Sonya...

    She is a puller. If I put a check chain or flat collar on her it's just an instant invitation for her to go all husky on me.

    Training was and is to no avial with her, and I'm reasonably experienced with dog training. But she's not all that bright and has a strong drive for rabbits which are pretty much everywhere when we walk.

    The only thing I've found to work is a headcollar called "Infini8". It works from a martingale collar with a figure 8 strap around her nose which lifts her head gently with minimal pressure.

    Now she walks with a feather light touch on her lead, and it never interferes with her breathing or panting. The only time she objects is when she wants to take off after a rabbit and can't... she's a rabbit monster...

    It is soooo nice to walk her now without her dragging the whole way, it used to be such a chore with her.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Thanks for all your suggests I'll try some of them. Hopeful I'll be able to get Isaac to walk well on the lead.
    My dog is my best friend and helps me though those hard days.
    ♥Isaac♥Bronson♥Pepper♥
    ♥Animals♥

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,651

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    I noticed in the world dog games hightlights they showed on channel 7 last Saturday, that all the farm dogs had big fat rope type leads and they all played tug with them as reward for finishing whatever task they had - agility round, frisbee catch, or flyball. It was especially popular with the flyball dogs.

    I'm thinking since my dog has me doing the same thing, it's something farm dogs train their owners to do.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE Suburbs - Melbourne
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    487

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    for stopping a dog chewing on the lead while walking I Suggest rub deep heat on the parts he usually chews. Dogs hate the taste of Deep Heat. Only thing is you will need to reapply every 2 days or so as the taste disapates after time...
    Dogs Aren't Our Whole Lives, But They Make Our Lives Whole


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