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Thread: Prong Collars, Why?

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChoppaChop View Post
    You know what amazes me Occy....those that vehemently preaching 'love,kindness,gentle' to us dont seem to really have a clue about dog 'etiqute'(sp?) .

    And that is scarey.

    Doesn't amaze me - armchair critics are everywhere and we have all sat in that chair at one point or another.

    However, there appears to be ignorance on both sides and an unwillingness to listen to the others point of view.

    Anyone who knows everything about a subject should quit and find something new!

  2. #72
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    Have seen the use of a prong collar on a large rhodesian ridgeback male and was amazed at how nicely he walked on lead. Tried it out on my 45kg ridgeback girl and she went from pulling like a steam train to walking nicley at my side with minutes.
    I have also tried a prong collar on myself to see what it does and if it was my choice between prong or choke chain, the prong wins hands down.
    K9 force is a well respected trainer that has some intereting things to say. His Nothing in Life is Free apporach has worked beautifully on not just my dogs but also the fosters that have come through here.
    Thankyou K9 force for TRYING to educate people on this forum.

    Foster Carer for Shar Pei Rescue Queensland

  3. #73
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    "I don't like people who think like Mimi deciding for me what tools I can and cannot use"
    Hyacinth. I have only spoken about my experience. I have every right to express MY opinion. I you read my posts, the word "I" is clear in every sentence.
    Funny how the people who attack are the same ones. Just read Kassie's threads and you will see the same names appearing.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    Lades would walk on her GL, I would say heal, and hold a tight lead until i felt she was walking nicely and I'd loosen the lead. As soon as she moved away from my side, I would say heal and bring her back to my side and so on.

    I don't know what you would classify that as, but it works.
    There is a difference between fixing a problem and managing a problem.

    Fixing a problem would be...you have a dog that pulls you down the street. You put on GL...say heel to your dog and she walks by your side. After a couple of weeks doing this and dog is walking great...you take GL off and she is STILL heeling at your side...walking without pulling!

    Managing is just that. It manages the problem, but as soon as you take the GL off and try walking your dog on a plain collar...they drag you down the street again.

    Yes...it works, but it hasn't trained your dog to be polite and walk nicely...it has managed your problem.

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleasanta View Post
    There is a difference between fixing a problem and managing a problem.

    Fixing a problem would be...you have a dog that pulls you down the street. You put on GL...say heel to your dog and she walks by your side. After a couple of weeks doing this and dog is walking great...you take GL off and she is STILL heeling at your side...walking without pulling!

    Managing is just that. It manages the problem, but as soon as you take the GL off and try walking your dog on a plain collar...they drag you down the street again.

    Yes...it works, but it hasn't trained your dog to be polite and walk nicely...it has managed your problem.
    Im not sure I understand this 100%
    Going by what your saying I have fixed Lady's problem?
    Education not Legislation

  6. #76
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    If you take the gl off, does she pull?

  7. #77
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    I want to thank Steve Courtney (K9Force) for his educational posts and informative website . I...like many were ignorant regarding training tools. I think there is a place for using all the different tools, but I also think it should be done with professional education as to HOW to use those tools PROPERLY. ANYTHING has to be better than having to put your dog down, "because you are at the end of the road and this is it". Some states have banned the use of E-collars, but we can buy an invisible dog fence (electric), that will zap your dog if they get near the fence line. We can buy check chains of the supermarket shelf even though it has been proven they are dangerous to our dogs and can injure their neck...and the same goes for head halters and GL.

    I have kinda stayed out of the discussion regarding using force, punishment and "alpha" position, because people probably know where I stand on that. I know for a fact that when Sumo is pulling...he is definitely not being well-behaved. We took him to obedience training and their ways of training (Delta Trainers) left my dog with head to the ground and refusing to move. He had shut down completely and stopped listening to me. The trainer said I HAD to give him a check collar or head halter on. Still to this day...the sound of the check collar gets the same reaction from him...head down and he is shaking just from the sound of it. We have tried harnesses, but because of his sensitive skin...they left him red raw in his armpits.

    My dogs are definitely a member of our family, but they are also dogs. Dogs communicate with each other using high-pitched sounds...growling...snapping and even biting etc. My Staffy girl will definitely tell Sumo off when he is too interested in her girly bits. She doesn't turn around and say (like we humans would)...please stay away from my bits...she will growl and eventually bite him if he doesn't stop. I am very guilty in sometimes "babying" my dogs, but I am learning and learning from experience. The conversation here between hubby and I often ends with hubby: for christ sake...they are dogs sweetie...Me: yes they are...but they are MY dogs! Hubby said...should we go out for Christmas lunch and I said...no we can't because the dogs are here and they are not used to be by themselves!!! I can hear how insane that sounds, but they are not used to be by themselves...I am here almost all the time!

    So I have decided...I need to let my dogs be dogs and that is 100%. They need to learn to be by themselves so I can have some freedom. They are not babies who need constant supervision! They need to understand that I AM the boss and that is 100%...including not pulling me down the street and begging when we eat! That doesn't mean I have stopped loving my dogs!

    Mimi...I understand what you are saying regarding your dogs being your best friend...your 6th finger and all that, but can you honestly say you are doing what is best for your dogs? Do you have 100% control over your dogs if they should one day get away from you and run out in the traffic (like Occy said). I KNOW I don't have that control over my dogs and I am not afraid of saying it. There is no doubt in my mind that you love your dogs, that they are kind and sweet. But do they respect you as the pack leader, boss, alpha or what ever you might call it? In doggy way of thinking...there must be a leader of the pack. The pack hierarchy can change on a daily basis amongst a pack of dogs (if you have more than one), but the pack leader should always be YOU no matter how their hierarchy changes. I know I can't say 100% that Sumo believes I am the pack leader...especially when he is still dragging me down the street, begging for food and jumps on my lap. This is something I need to work on! I don't think there is anything negative by saying...you know, I have handled this wrong and I need to change my ways for my dogs to be balanced and happy. It is about us growing as people...learning from our mistakes and from others and keeping an open mind

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    If you take the gl off, does she pull?
    No, she doesn't.
    We haven't walked in a GL for at least 4 years.
    Education not Legislation

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    Im not sure I understand this 100%
    Going by what your saying I have fixed Lady's problem?
    I said...yes the GL manages the problem...it stops her from pulling. BUT...does she pull again when you try WITHOUT the GL? If she does...then you have not fixed the problem...you are managing it! Fixing...managing...2 VERY different things.

    Fixing would be...she UNDERSTANDS she must walk properly...managing is...she has no other choice because the GL is controlling it.

    Do you understand the difference?

  10. #80
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    Oh, my, god.

    Ok I'll start from the beginning yeah? Lady was a terrible leash walker. I used my same technique with a normal collar. Didn't work. I couldn't even get her to my side. Got a GL, used it for about 2 weeks everyday using the same technique. After the two weeks, she would heel without the GL.
    We no longer use a Gentle Leader and she heels perfectly.
    Education not Legislation

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