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Thread: Advice PLEASE

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Devonport, Tasmania
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    6,675

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    Yes, please do let us know what you think once you've seen him/her.
    Try not to be nervous, the dog will certainly pick up on that also.

    Good luck.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Near Newcastle, NSW
    Posts
    4,215

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    Look...every type of training takes time, patience, consistency and love.

    Both my dogs were completely house trained at about 4 months (and I bloody knew they were) including at night time. It was a lot of hard work...mountains of treats...praising like they won the gold medal at the Olympics when they went outside......and ignoring their little mistakes inside

    My concern is though...if she hasn't even spent the time toilet training her dog...what else is this poor little thing lacking in? With that I mean...socialisation...training...human bonding, love etc etc!

    Why is she getting rid of this dog? Has it been sick or injured in the time she has had it? Does it suffer from any ongoing complaints? How is this dog with children and other animals?

    It is SO easy to get a dog following your heart and not your head...trust me, I once did that looking at a Rottweiler puppy (from some registered breeders). This puppy grew to 55 kg in 8 months and one morning attacked my 2 boys and them my husband! I obedience and show trained this dog EVERY day, so it came down to something I couldn't fight...his genetic blue print!

    There is always a reason why they get rid of a dog. In most cases it is not the dogs fault...it is the owners lack of understanding and training!!! 80% of dogs ending up at the pound is either because they still pee and poo inside or are to "boisterous" around small children.

    Toilet training is easy if done correctly! I have NEVER had a dog past 5 months that still soiled inside (except for my Staffy boy here who has decided to lift his leg on my leather lounge). I am very pedantic with taking them out every 1/2 hour...after every play time...after every sleep...after eating time etc. I NEVER scold my puppies for doing it inside, because ultimately...it is MY fault they did it due to not picking up on the signals eg...circling a spot...sniffing the ground etc. I praise them like they won the gold medal when they do it outside and a liver treat is always on hand

    It is back to basics like if you just received an 8 week old puppy. Have a designated peeing and pooping area...encourage for her to relieve herself there and PRAISE...PRAISE...PRAISE when she does. Say..."go pee" when she is doing it and HALLELUJA...you might just end up with a dog that can pee on command...pretty cool

    CAUTION...be 100% sure this little girl fits into your family dynamics. She has been with an owner who obviously couldn't care less, so she deserves a forever home

    What sort of dog is it? The reason I ask is because Staffies are kinda "small"...they are definitely not large, but I would have GREAT reservations selling a staffy puppy to a family with children under 5-6. Staffies are excuberant...high-energy...go happy dogs and also EXTREMELY powerful. They would NEVER intentionally hurt a child, but that could easily happen if they push or pull this child to the ground. If it is to a family who is used to powerful breeds, then it is a different kettle of fish. My youngest is almost 15 and when he "wrestles" with Sumo...Benjamin comes out second due to Sumo's powers. This play however is important for Sumo to learn inhibition and restaint when we say OUCH. He already knows (and has for a fair while)....no teeth means...NO TEETH and NO MOUTHING. He licks you to death and it can be so intense some times, that he needs to be stopped...LOL What can I say...he is just a Staffy Boofhead

    So...do your homework! Are you capable of putting in the time, love and patience this little girl puppy needs? Yes...she is still just a puppy

    Good luck!

  3. #13

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    Hi
    so I went to see the little dog and she was ery cute .I could tell not much had been done with her . I watched her with the 3 year old child there .

    I have taken her home ,she is a maltese cross jack russel and her temperment seems to be more jack russel.She has been great with my 2 young boys they have run around with her all afternoon .They have played ball with her and run after her .SO FAR SO GOOD .
    now things were so great I even went out for a hour and left her in the laundry and when I came back NO MESS .I think she has some idea about going outside to pee . I have bought her lots of new stuff,she was full of fleas and needed a bath so we have de flead her .Poor girl didnt even have a collar.Ok so all is great till my cat came home for his dinner and the little dog has gone nuts .I havent been able to let her outside at all cause all she wants to do is get my cat and is barking like mad .I put her on a lead and showed her the cat again ,my cat even came over to sniff her .The little dog (tilly) just wants to get at the cat so much .So now what ????? do you think there is any hope at all of her getting over this cat thing as i cant even put her outside to pee with out her barking and running around .Oh I did call the lady I got her off and she said she has never seen a cat .
    Apart from the cat thing she seems great very gentle with the kids but the cat thing is a huge problem ,any advice would be great

    thanks again

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

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    I have always introduced a cat and dog through glass or gauze door. Then I would progress to the dog on a lead and sniff, if the cat was willing. I have done this numerous times with different dogs. With one cat, a swipe on the nose was all that was needed.

    My old blue heeler (rip) would go after and kill any feral cat, so would blacky (rip) but not those they figured out belonged here.

    Pretty had not been introduced to our 3rd cat a while ago,is fine with the other two but attacked (no blood) when stinky was on a veranda chair. Once she was told this one belonged, a very loud NOOOO and later when the cat braved coming back, a strong friendship was formed between them as seen by a pic in my thread and the dog forum video. It also helps to be able to keep them separate during the introductory phase, in fact it really is a must.

  5. #15

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    I think she certainly must have good dose of jack russell in her! Give her time with the cat. Put her on a lead when you want to try them near each other, so you can back up your verbal cues by having some control of her.

    It sounds like she might have missed some important basic training in the last few months. But she is very young still, so be patient.

    And be careful with it, your cat is better off if it's confidence with her builds to the point where it will turn around a have a swat at her. This won't happen if she hurts or really scares the cat, and that will make things even harder for you all!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    297

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    we've had chloe for 3 weeks and our cat will not have a bar of her hisses when Chloe's sound asleep and Loki; the cat walks by, its INSANE! but chloe just looks at her like "wtf?" puts her head down and goes about her day...

    mind you, mums cat loves chloe as does our neighbors cat... We did the glass door thing, then the leash and finally outside in open space, so if the cat felt threatened she could jump the fence for a min or two..

    I've caught Chloe 'herding' mums and the neighbors cat, but they've both swiped her so she's a bit scared of them (quite funny to watch!).. I walked in yesterday at mums to see Chloe giving the cat a bath and the cat just lying there, tried soo hard to get a pic but the cat bolted before i could

    SLow and steady, but at the end of the day some dogs and cat's wont get along...

    On the leash does she want to run after the cat? or does she just want to be AROUND the cat/ protect you?

  7. #17

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    Hi
    I have had her on the lead and she goes insane and seems to even forget I have her on a lead .She barks and barks non stop (kinda worried about my neighbours) So Im going to see how we go today .Oh guess what I got her up this morning from the laundry and NO MESS she went right out and done a pee on the grass .I think she has missed alot of basic training so we will see how we go today

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    845

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    Tilly sounds like a delightful little dog. I do hope you can sort out the cat problem.
    The more people I meet, the more I like my dogs.

  9. #19

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    See if you can find something she really likes to use as a distraction. For example, if she is nuts for a ball or treats work on that, giving her the same command each time. Hopefully as she learns a command for the thing she really loves it can then break through the excitement of seeing the cat.

    Look up Cesar Milan online, her behaviour with the cat is what he terms "red zone" which means she is so completely focussed on that thing (the cat) that little or nothing else can get through to her. You'll see some examples of it in his videos. It is definitely fixable stuff, but requires patience and consistency. You'll get there!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Near Newcastle, NSW
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    4,215

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    In a perfect world...cats and dogs would live harmoniously...but unfortunately it is often not the case

    Along with our 2 staffies...we have 2 cats. One of them absolutely hates the dogs and more or less stay upstairs where the dogs can't get to her...the other one has grown up with a big, male rottweiler, so he couldn't care less.

    Cats trigger the prey drive in almost all dogs because they run! My male cat has learned to sit still and let them sniff him and the novelty wears off from the dogs point of view. We have had to get the cat's head out of Sumo's mouth, because he ran and Sumo was quicker...Sumo didn't hurt him, but was definitely reprimanded...that behaviour is NOT acceptable!

    Introducing cats and dogs must be done slowly and carefully. The cat must ALWAYS have an out, because if it feels cornered...it could severely hurt your dog.

    I hope your little puppy is doing great and it is lovely to hear she is great with the kids and that you saved her from someone who didn't care...GOOD ON YA!!!

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