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Thread: GSD Pup Attempting to Control Walk

  1. #11
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    Hey Devil's Advocate, instead of re-writing what you want to reply too, you click the 'quote' button and it will do the work for you.

    No need for my input for the OP.
    Education not Legislation

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    I know there are a lot of dogs and owners out there who play this game with each other, love it, and have no problems.

    But there are also a lot of them that never should!
    I know and for those others I said it's bull***.

  3. #13

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    Thanks everybody for your help and advice. He is not doing it as much but we are getting there

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew View Post
    G'day

    Tug of war is a game that is very much about dominance. It is something that should never have been permitted in the first place, but that does not help you now.

    If you insist on using a harness and he is grabbing the lead, purchase a lead that is made out of chain. He will almost certainly not like the chain in his mouth.

    The next thing I would be doing is to train him to play tug of war and associate it with a command. Use a single 'toy' with this command. When he understands the command then add extra toys for him to play the game with.

    He is only to use this toy and command together. When you decide he is to stop say ""No 'command'" and take it away from him. If he repeats the tug of war say ""No 'command'" and proceed with what he is supposed to be doing.

    Just remember that you control when the game starts and when it stops.

    Happy training

    cya
    Matthew
    Completely agree with you Matthew!!


    Lilly84 - Have you tried praising the desired behavour? With my Mal (she's 18wks old) I use rewards and praise for the desired behavour. I use her food as "treats" as she is very food driven. For every command she does she gets 1 dry dog food biscuit. So for the command "sit" she will get 1 biscuit. For the command "come" she gets 1 biscuit and so forth does that make sense? I have already got her sitting, staying comming and down. You need to do the training for what ever it is you want frequently. I would do 10 commands every 1-2 hours whilst at home. You need to be consistent other wise the dog will get confused.

    I'm trying to get her to walk on her lead without pulling and so I am praising her for good behavour and giving out her biscuit. Also when she pulls ahead on her lead I will turn quickly in the opposite direction so she knows that I am the boss and I control where she goes. it's still early for us but she is doing very well so far.
    1 Siberian Husky Diesel
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huskymum View Post
    Completely agree with you Matthew!!


    Lilly84 - Have you tried praising the desired behavour? With my Mal (she's 18wks old) I use rewards and praise for the desired behavour. I use her food as "treats" as she is very food driven. For every command she does she gets 1 dry dog food biscuit. So for the command "sit" she will get 1 biscuit. For the command "come" she gets 1 biscuit and so forth does that make sense? I have already got her sitting, staying comming and down. You need to do the training for what ever it is you want frequently. I would do 10 commands every 1-2 hours whilst at home. You need to be consistent other wise the dog will get confused.

    I'm trying to get her to walk on her lead without pulling and so I am praising her for good behavour and giving out her biscuit. Also when she pulls ahead on her lead I will turn quickly in the opposite direction so she knows that I am the boss and I control where she goes. it's still early for us but she is doing very well so far.
    Yep, I do that all the time but yet he still does it. He doesn't do it all the time but he does it occassionally which is still unacceptable considering he is a big boy. I do train him and walk him daily. Some days are good and he does not mock up but then there are those days ....
    I got him not to pull on the leash when I am walking him easy but getting him not to use the leash as a tag toy while walking ... hmmm....

  6. #16
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    How did you go with the chain lead? And the command in regard to this behaviour? Is it working or has something else developed?

    cya
    Matthew

  7. #17
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    Hi Lilly84,

    The reason he bites the lead is your not controlling him properly, and the other reason is he's a puppy. He should not be in a harness as this encourages pulling. You need to take him to obedience training run by the GSD club in your state, where you will learn how to handle him. Or your local all breeds club.

    What you need is a 2 mt cloth lead and a check chain, but you must be shown how to use the check chain correctly otherwise you could choke him.
    Treats play a very big part in his training, as you will learn and always tell him how good he is.

    He is not trying to control or dominate you, he's just a big silly puppy who loves you and he won't mature till he's 3 yrs old.
    Tug o war is a great game and a game only dogs love it, and so do I.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    If I'm still having trouble stopping her from playing tug - I try to be as boring as possible. Tug is only fun if someone else is tugging the opposite way. So I don't tug back, I turn side on to Frosty and pretend I'm a fence pole - which is no fun to play tug with.

    Very good advice IMO. Just don't play the game. Matthew's advice is also excellent.

    Another option you could try is the "stop" method of training when out and about for your daily walks. He grabs the leash, you stop walking. Once he lets it go, you continue walking. He grabs, you stop... .

    Absolutely terrific for teaching a dog to heel, and also useful for re-teaching a dog who is starting to display unwelcome habits/behaviour when walking.
    DA This is an excellent technique! I used this method when teaching Bailey not to PULL! (take me for a walk lol)

    It can take a long time however it really depends on your dog! Bailey picked in up after 2 (1hr) walks round the block of stop, start stop etc. I also incorporated the word 'walk' into it so that when she was walking properly I would say walk.

    I can now walk her off lead and she will not leave my side, if she goes to jog or run I just say the command 'walk' and she does as is expected

    However Mully is still being extremely persistent! So walks with her take much longer!

    Very good technique though I highly recommend if trying to stop pulling.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    I believe Matthew said that tug of war was a game of dominance - and it is.
    Tug of war is not a dominance game, it is is an interactive game. It is s best described as a cooperative predatory game. Unless you have created a dog that resource guards by incorrectly playing ToW, the dog always comes back for more - whether he or the handler "wins" If this was truly about dominance as you suggest - like with meat - the winning dog would not continue giving the loser an opportunity to retake the item.


    Links Between Play and Dominance and Attachment Dimensions of Dog-Human Relationships
    Authors: Nicola J. Rooney a; John W. S. Bradshaw a
    Published in: journal Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, Volume 6, Issue 2 April 2003 , pages 67 - 94

    Abstract
    It is often claimed that certain behavioral problems in domestic dogs can be triggered by the games played by dog and caregiver (owner). In this study, we examine possible links between the types of games played and dimensions of the dog-owner relationship that are generally considered to affect such problems. Fifty dog-owner partnerships were filmed during 3-min play sessions in which the owner was allowed to choose the games played. All partnerships then undertook a 1-hr test designed to measure elements of behavior commonly ascribed to "dominance" and "attachment." Principal components analysis of the data produced 2 dominance-related factors (Amenability and Confident Interactivity) and 4 factors describing aspects of attachment (Nonspecific Attention Seeking, Preference for Owner, Preference for Unfamiliar Person, and Separation-Related Behavior). Amenability, in particular, varied significantly between breeds. In the study, we then compared types of games played to each of these factors. Dogs playing rough-and-tumble scored higher for Amenability and lower on Separation-Related Behavior than did dogs playing other types of games. Dogs playing tug-of-war and fetch scored high on Confident Interactivity. Winning or losing these games had no consistent effect on their test scores. If the dog started the majority of the games, the dog was significantly less amenable and more likely to exhibit aggression. The results suggest that how dogs play reflects general attributes of their temperament and relationship with their owner. This study provides no evidence that games play a major deterministic role on dominance dimensions of dog-human relationships, but the results suggest that playing games involving considerable body contact may affect attachment dimensions.

  10. #20
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    Western Sydney
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    I am not having a go at anyone, but to me Dominant, Dominating and Dominance are words used by some people who have no idea how to handle or control their dog.

    I think people confuse Dominant with Stubborn which GSD's and Rotties are Both breeds need obedience training and both clubs offer excellent training, not to mention all breed clubs so there's no excuse.

    A TV vet once said if you play tug o war make sure you win as GSD's and Rotties are much stronger than us how can this happen what a load of crap.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

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