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Thread: Recall at the Beach

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Wollongong NSW
    Posts
    20

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    G'day

    I believe that a dog that should keep an eye on it's owner.

    My GSD I rescued from the pound and initially she would ignore me if I let her off the leash. To stop this behaviour we did lots of walks where there were no animal distractions.

    To start the game I would run excitedly in the opposite direction, making all sorts of noise and she would hurriedly follow. When she caught up with me she gets lots of praise.

    Slowly I reduced the noise and simply hide whenever she is not keeping her eyes on me.

    This has produced a dog that is happy to watch me and I get her attention always.

    hth


    cya
    Matthew

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    I would be concerned that you are letting her off when she isnt yet ready. There is too much stimulus for her to handle. Step it back and go to where her recall is reliable and work from there
    I agree with Occy. I have a 4 1/2 month old boxer puppy and I used to think letting her off at the park was great fun for her to socialise, and so much fun for a little playful puppy like her...lucky I reliased quickly that I was heading the wrong direction. Letting your dog off lead when they are not ready means they will learn to make decisions for themselves and not look at you as the alpha. In the dog pack the alpha makes all decisions (food, play, walk, etc.). I haven't gone to a dog park for the last 4 weeks or more, but rather train with her at home in the yard and gradually move further out onto the street to build her confidence and trust in me. It's not about training your dog to do great things, but to have your dog control itself and look at you to make decisions for it.
    Anyone who is truely interested in dog behaviour read Jan Fennell's books...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    Klaud

    This hasn't been my experience with my dog. She gets off lead, she's not perfect at recall and she sure as hell doesn't get to decide when play, walk or food happen.

    Jan Fennell's techniques have mostly been debunked by some proper scientific research and observation of wolves in the wild.
    The Alpha Fallacy | Dog Star Daily

    I knew there was some reason I didn't like this alpha / dominance thing. For starters in my experience - it doesn't work reliably - it makes some dogs worse. It's more like being a tyrant with your dog than a leader. And I do need my dog to make the right decisions for herself from time to time. I'm not with her always and there is nothing more annoying to me - than a dog that will do nothing for itself (cf some kelpies - always pestering you for what to do next).

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
    Posts
    513

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tkay View Post
    Occy and Devil's advocate,

    I hear what you're saying but i just wasn't sure how much the noise/wind was a factor, whether she was ignoring me or just couldn't hear me. That's why I mentioned the whistle.

    I have gone a bought one today so I will start training with that and see how we go.
    Tkay you could also try using hand signals.

    My late Deerhound Weyland was 99.9% reliable on recall and this is rare in a sighthound. I train my dogs a little differently to most people. I train off lead at home when the pup is young and coming when called is the first thing I teach. It's so simple with a young pup as they want to be with you any way. With Weyland my hand or rather arm signal was simply to hold both arms out when I called. A large sighthound can cover a lot of distance in a very short time and he soon learnt to obey the signal even if he couldn't hear my voice.

    Might be worth a try if the whistle proves too noisy.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, Qld
    Posts
    909

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    Thanks Deerhound, that's a good idea. I am trying to incorporate hand signals but I do need to be more consistent with this.

    The whistle idea is not working at the moment, Jenna is just stunned when I blow it and won't even take a treat. I'm not blowing it hard at all but I've decided to leave it for now and try again in a few weeks. She is definitely going through a 'teenager' stage at the moment so it's pretty much back to basics for now. I will only let her off lead when there are no other dogs or people around and even then not for too long. I'm trying to avoid 'failures' to recall as much as possible and then she goes and gets a whiff of big fat dead fish and she's off again
    The best things in life, aren't things

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    6,675

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    Your Jenna is absolutely gorgeous TKay!

    Just popped in to see how you went with the whistle.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Klaud

    This hasn't been my experience with my dog. She gets off lead, she's not perfect at recall and she sure as hell doesn't get to decide when play, walk or food happen.

    Jan Fennell's techniques have mostly been debunked by some proper scientific research and observation of wolves in the wild.
    The Alpha Fallacy | Dog Star Daily

    I knew there was some reason I didn't like this alpha / dominance thing. For starters in my experience - it doesn't work reliably - it makes some dogs worse. It's more like being a tyrant with your dog than a leader. And I do need my dog to make the right decisions for herself from time to time. I'm not with her always and there is nothing more annoying to me - than a dog that will do nothing for itself (cf some kelpies - always pestering you for what to do next).
    Hi Hyacinth,

    There are definitely more ways than just one to train a dog. Personally I find Jan Fennells method very good as a starting point on how to communicate with your dog, I don't find it tyranning in any way (the word alpha is a strong word but it's not meant that way). I'm not saying that this is the only way to teach your dog, I actually find that some things work better than others. I have read the dogstar website and many other sites as well, and there is some great information out there. For me it's about finding a balance for training your dog and how you live with your dog. There can never be just one solution or approach because every owner and every dog is different.
    In response to the decision making comment - I agree. My pup too is faced with hundreds of situations every day where it has to make it's own decision. I cannot be with her 24/7, but what I can do is build her confidence and show her what to do so that she can make the RIGHT decisions when I'm not there with her.

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