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Thread: Small Dog Problem (long Post)

  1. #1
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    Default Small Dog Problem (long Post)

    We have an 7 year old miniature foxie x chichuaha, male. We bought him as a pup and he was a lovely pup, he was socialised with dogs, cats and other farm animals from an early age and he was also socialised with other people. The older he got the more his personality "set in" he began to nip and the back legs of the horses if he thought they were in his territory which doesn't end up going very well (three vet trips for being kicked), thankfully he seems to have learned from those experiences and no longer does that.

    However, he is very aggressive with our other dog, the dog which he was brought up with has since passed and we got this new dog as a pup too, she is a lovely obedient lady who is really still a pup and submits to his growls even though she's four to five times his size. He will attack her for no reason, when they are playing with a ball he'll suddenly turn and bite her and hes even drawn blood in his savage little rants at her.

    He has to be locked in a room if we get visitors with small children as he runs out and bites them. We have two children who are both gentle with the dogs, I don't allow the youngest to have any unsupervised access to the little dog even though the dog wags his tail and licks him if he corners the dog or tries to pick him up the dog will bite. He is extremely territorial now and his aggression towards people and the other dog is getting out of hand. He is reasonably obedient when he wants to be ie he'll come back when called if chasing something and he sits, stays etc too except when a car pulls up and people get out.

    Now, I've tried putting him in a room and then letting him out, I've tried leaving him in the room the whole time, I've tried putting him outside when he's bitten someone inside and vice versa, I've tried squirting him with water and yes I admit I have also given him a smack.

    I know someone else who got a pup from the same litter and it was worse as far as aggression towards people go and it was socialised well early on too.

    I guess I'd like to know why he's progressively gone this way he's never bitten me at all but he does with everyone else, he constantly growls at the other dog and is completely un trustworthy with the children and visitors. Is there anything I can do at this late stage or do I just stick it out?

    The pup is off to the vet for desexing should I send the small man too or is it too late (hormone wise) to make a difference?

  2. #2
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    Hi there and welcome to the forum

    You post attracted me to it like a magnet ...I could nearly have posted the same thing 10 months ago!

    I too have a 7 yr old mini foxy x chi and he is very much like yours. He grew up with our old dog who past away 2 yrs ago...when I decided to get another pup (a large pup too)..he was soo aggressive towards her. It took him a good 8 weeks before he actually settled down and started to play with her rather then bare his teeth and growl. He has accepted her now and happily (and noisily...constant growl) plays with her!

    I also have 4 kids....he has bitten my eldest daughter as she tried to pick him up (not allowed!!)...he's also nipped my youngest son as a warning.

    I honestly don't know...maybe these dogs get more and more cranky as they get older? Falcon LOVES adults...he'll jump in their lap and stay there..but come other dogs and kids...nope, he's an agressive little sh!t.

    Sorry I don't have an answer...I just wanted to let you know...you are not alone with this problem...I call it "small dog syndrome" lol

    Oh...yes, I do suggest getting him desexed...it's never too late
    Last edited by ozeymum; 08-20-2009 at 08:00 AM.

  3. #3
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    My advice - professional help. The dog has dominance and teritorial issues. These are well ingrained by the sounds of it and long term.

    I would be having a professional behaviourlist/trainer visit and be put on a training program. Part of the problem may be you (I mean this in a nice way) and with the help of a professional, you might be able to get him on track and learn a few ways of dealing with him.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
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    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowgirl View Post
    However, he is very aggressive with our other dog, the dog which he was brought up with has since passed and we got this new dog as a pup too, she is a lovely obedient lady who is really still a pup and submits to his growls even though she's four to five times his size. He will attack her for no reason, when they are playing with a ball he'll suddenly turn and bite her and hes even drawn blood in his savage little rants at her.
    Foxies (and terriers in general) are posessive little brats Is he aggro with your other dog as soon as he sees her or just when playing? I think you should leave them and they will sort out who is who between them. She's a pup and she's obviously annoying as all pups are to older dogs and he will teach her what she can or cannot do. I wouldn't interfere there really.

    He has to be locked in a room if we get visitors with small children as he runs out and bites them.
    He just sees a child and charges or he bites if child approaches?

    Small dogs are usually not so keen on kids. Kids movements are different then adults', and little dogs naturally feel insecure and intimidated especially if they are lifted and carried against their will. They don't have control over anything like big dogs do - because big dogs can not be lifted and carried and can easily move away. So little ones bite more often and it's their only defense, and in return they're labeled as nervous and hysterical . So, keep him away from kids in terms not to allow kids play with him by lifting and carrying.


    I don't allow the youngest to have any unsupervised access to the little dog even though the dog wags his tail and licks him if he corners the dog or tries to pick him up the dog will bite.
    That is exactly what I am talking about. Typical sign of insecurity. Dogs hate to be cornered. Try cornering him yourself and you will see signs that are showing his discontent: looking aside, licking his nose, maybe yawning or his body will look crouched. You should allow him his space, and yes, it's hard with small kids, but when kids grow up and learn what they shouldn't do it will be fine. He doesn't hate your kids, he wags his tail and lick them - he's just afraid of them because they are naturally clumsy and to him - huge

    @Anne: Part of the problem may be you
    We humans usually are the biggest problem
    Last edited by Fedra; 08-20-2009 at 03:18 PM.

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    Thanks for the replies.

    He is agro with her when he first sees her and if she's being a puppy doofus, or if she sits anywhere near him, if she leaves him alone he doesn't actively seek her out. I do not interfere in their spats unless there is blood involved.

    He bites off and on, sometimes he goes directly to their car and bites whomever is there, child or adult. No one is allowed to pick him up at all only my eldest daughter and myself. I always express to the kids who come not to touch him.

    He has his own space, he sleeps on his own and is not expected to share a bed or feed bowl with the other dog. He has an awfully funny way of showing his displeasure (well I laugh), he sneezes.

    I can do anything with him, I can pick him up, corner him, turn him on his back and he doesn't growl at me at all.

    I agree its most likely something we've let form over time, our old dog used to keep him very much in line but then he died and we have most probably failed to rein in the behaviour.

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    He is agro with her when he first sees her
    What do you mean "when he sees her"? They don't share the same space all the time? Do you separate them and let them together sometime (like before walk or just when you're there)?

    He bites off and on, sometimes he goes directly to their car and bites whomever is there, child or adult.
    he' territorial, very likely. Maybe when someone comes you should put him on leash, or order to sit and wait til you let him no he can come or go.

    No one is allowed to pick him up at all only my eldest daughter and myself. I always express to the kids who come not to touch him.
    That's OK. He trusts you and your daughter, he doesn't trust anyone else and why should he. He's not a toy, he doesn't like it, so respect it and try to stop people and kids from lifting him. If they don't listen then... it's their problem really, not his I know it sounds harsh, but it's true. Just like we, people don't like certain things and are sensitive about some things, doesn't mean taht dog's aren't too.

    He has an awfully funny way of showing his displeasure (well I laugh), he sneezes.
    Yep, that's also one of so called "calming signals" when a dog shows discomfort.

    I can do anything with him, I can pick him up, corner him, turn him on his back and he doesn't growl at me at all.
    That's great, he trusts you and you're the leader.

    I agree its most likely something we've let form over time, our old dog used to keep him very much in line but then he died and we have most probably failed to rein in the behaviour.
    The old dog was his boss It's not unusual. Perhaps you're a bit too soft on him in some ways. Be firmer in terms of letting him know what he must not do. Like ordering him to sit when someone comes to your place before he actually decides to run off and bite someone. Maybe it's time for him to be a boss to your pup, but you have to let him

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    They don't sleep together at night and when he first sees her in the morning he can be quite nasty to her. I guess its just a puppy thing on her behalf and I hope it settles down in time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowgirl View Post
    They don't sleep together at night and when he first sees her in the morning he can be quite nasty to her. I guess its just a puppy thing on her behalf and I hope it settles down in time.
    Just let them be together. Separating them is really not a great idea. Let her have her own bed, doesn't have to be next to him, just let them share the space and get used to it. He must learn that she's part of this family and part of his life.

    If she sleeps with you in your bedroom - even worse, he's jealous.

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    She sleeps in our daughters room, the small dog was supposed to be her dog but never really co-operated, he ended up sleeping in our room on the floor with the Stafford we owned (who was his boss). He loves our daughter very much but seems to like sleeping in our room, he sleeps on the floor on the doona the old dog slept on and is quite protective of it. I know I probably should get rid of it but I am quite attached to it myself (silly I know) and its fine for him to keep warm on. The pup has always slept in our daughters room and she is a good dog in there, she sometimes comes into our room in the day time and goes onto the doona (its under the bed). Huron growls at her the entire time and it just seems to cruel to her but generally I let them sort it out. I can't have the two in the same room at night to sleep as the growling and constant posturing drives me insane.
    Last edited by Cowgirl; 08-24-2009 at 11:12 PM.

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    Ahhhh, I think the little dog is being very protective of your old dogs blanket and he is more than likely still grieving. How long ago did the older dog pass away? I understand how you feel about the blanket and not wanting to get rid of it, but I don't think your little dog is able to move on if you keep the blanket out. I still have my old girls blanket, bowl and collar...but they are all put away...as with ppl with pass away...we have to eventually pack their things up to...it's all a part of healing.
    My old girl always slept on the floor beside my bed...and that is where our little dog continues to sleep now..my son would love to have him on his bed, but little Falcon prefers to be with me...his master.
    I really do think it's time to collect up all your old dogs things and put them away...to help your little dog move on

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