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Thread: Peeing and cowering

  1. #1

    Exclamation Peeing and cowering

    Hi guys, sorry it's been a while since I stopped by..busy busy busy!

    Well inevitably I'm back looking for some advice on our little Max.

    Max is now 5.5months growing into a very handsome and happy boy. HOWEVER....

    Max has been unfortunate enough to be caught 3 times chewing my new Nikes, my girls oldest and most favourite teddy and my Roxy specs ($600 pair of glasses) and on these three occasions he has gotten into mega trouble by me including being "banished" to the back yard for a while. While I was happy to have been able to catch him in the act (other random items have been fair welled due to his chewing tendencies but never did he get in trouble as I never caught him actually doing the deed) but now, weeks later Max has started peeing every time I raise my voice even when I'm scolding the kids (or their father lol) or sometimes even if I simply move too quickly toward him he drops to his belly and pees everywhere

    Now his getting in trouble was not anything worth this reaction to me now. I feel like I've lost his trust and I don't want him to cower and react like this to me. Up until these instances I could have done and said anything around him in any voice and he would only respond if he knew I was talking directly to him. Now it's whenever I make any sudden movements or noises. Even things like coughing or sneezing as I walk near him causes this nervous peeing....I'm devastated!

    He used to trust every word and move I made without hesitation....now he just runs away. What do I do? He is still finding things to chew despite my best efforts and a blanket box full of toys that he has 24/7 access to and now I'm too worried to scold him in case of cementing this nervousness he is now showing around me.
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  2. #2
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    sounds like he is going through a fear period. I remember a few of my dog suddenly becoming fearful, and shutting down.
    I was advised not to pander to the anxiety. But to carry on, up tempo, encouraging the dog to do something easy likea sit, and praising highly confident behaviour with high value rewards to the dog, pilchards and liver in this case. After a few weeks of keeping training sessions fun and upbeat, the pup's came out of the fear period naturally.

    Keep your dog within a safe zone perhaps, till the confidence returns. So exercise around the back garden, train in the house often etc. No introducing motorbikes, or loud lawn mowers, and dont hose your dog at all during this period, as once ruined a dog, when my son hosed the pup during this fearful period fo roughly 8 weeks before my confident numpty returned. Weird pups? arent they?

    my boys would go through phases of peeing in front of me as you describe, like i was evil owner who beat them daily for fun. Ive never hit these dogs, or ever hurt them to my knowledge. And so i ended up greeting the dogs outside the house, as they pee when i went near them. They grew out of it. Weird behaviour in a previously house trained dog. Odd.
    Last edited by bernie; 09-02-2015 at 06:15 PM.

  3. #3

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    'MadMaxMum' - So Max is 5.5months old ?

    When you said -
    Max has been unfortunate enough to be caught 3 times chewing my new Nikes, my girls oldest and most favourite teddy and my Roxy specs ($600 pair of glasses) and on these three occasions he has gotten into mega trouble by me including being "banished" to the back yard for a while.'
    I would really like to know what sort of punishment you dealt to this dog ?

    Sorry - But if any of my pups did this - peeing and cowing - I would be so ashamed.

    You have a very young pup -they chew things. They also go through teething at this age.

    You seem to be more concerned about your possessions - brand names that you supplied - than Max.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    'MadMaxMum' - So Max is 5.5months old ?

    When you said -


    I would really like to know what sort of punishment you dealt to this dog ?

    Sorry - But if any of my pups did this - peeing and cowing - I would be so ashamed.

    You have a very young pup -they chew things. They also go through teething at this age.

    You seem to be more concerned about your possessions - brand names that you supplied - than Max.
    Lol....umm ok

    My punishment was as soon as I saw him with the items I growled (yes like a dog) and in the same tone used very loudly to "MAX!!! NO!!" And the glass door and blinds as well closed after he scampered through them to his bed on his very own max dedicated alfresco area and stayed there completely ignored and shut out for an the afternoon including his favourite time of day when he normally comes to pick up the kids from work.... That's the sort of punishment I'm talking about. In Max's world that is the worst punishment he has ever been in and considered mega trouble in our household. Severe?? Yes. For him. For the majority of the rest of the worlds population of dogs??? You answer that for yourself.

    My "possessions and brand names" is a stupid statement. I'm not even going to bother going there it's not a statement worth my time.

    Yes very aware of teething stage. Not part of the question. Read the post again.

  5. #5

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    Thanks bernie I have heard about the fear period but didn't realise it could ever be toward their main carer who has "Max withdrawals" by lunch time on the days I work so I come home to have lunch with him lol we have such a close relationship that this is devastating.

    I also heard that it can be worse in entire dogs and more common in males?? (Max is booked in next week to be desexed)

    He also took longer to house train then any other dog I've had...

    Is there an average age range for these fear stages? It would be my luck that these instances happened just as he came into this stage too but the peeing and cowering started about a week after the last time I caught him (all being caught and scolded the exact same way and he has never been scolded or even glared at when I'm finding various other no nos in tiny pieces here and there)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMaxMum View Post
    Lol....umm ok

    My punishment was as soon as I saw him with the items I growled (yes like a dog) and in the same tone used very loudly to "MAX!!! NO!!" And the glass door and blinds as well closed after he scampered through them to his bed on his very own max dedicated alfresco area and stayed there completely ignored and shut out for an the afternoon including his favourite time of day when he normally comes to pick up the kids from work.... That's the sort of punishment I'm talking about. In Max's world that is the worst punishment he has ever been in and considered mega trouble in our household. Severe?? Yes. For him. For the majority of the rest of the worlds population of dogs??? You answer that for yourself.

    My "possessions and brand names" is a stupid statement. I'm not even going to bother going there it's not a statement worth my time.

    Yes very aware of teething stage. Not part of the question. Read the post again.
    Puppies and their chewing can be frustrating but it is what it is. They also have a very short attention span at that age. Once you have growled and said no, by then banishing him for an afternoon at that age would be very confusing and distressing and he would really have had no idea why.

    We all get annoyed when they destroy something but best to perhaps concentrate on rewarding them for the good stuff, supplying alternative things to chew and training sessions
    To be honest these day I don't get too worried about chewing stuff. I just blame myself totally for leaving my stuff in reach of puppy and smack myself lol. Your fault totally for leaving you exy sunglasses where he could get hold of them, you are the adult he is a baby puppy!

    Once When I discovered my new expensive running shoes being chewed, I was exceptionally mad - with myself! Puppy is now grown and my shoes are all safe lol

    I took on a rescue dog who was 5 months old and cowed and peed as he had also been chastised and punished for doing puppy things. Took me awhile to gain his trust. You do have to be fair with puppies they simply are not equipped to understand a punishment that lasts for hours.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-03-2015 at 08:14 AM.

  7. #7
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    Perhaps it is males that do this more? ive generally only owned males, and entire unless i get into issues with the dog.
    Fear periods
    from: Breeder Caretaker Community Pages
    blueln.gif - 286 Bytes

    Critical periods in puppy development
    Neonatal Period (0-12 Days):

    The puppy responds only to warmth, touch, and smell. He cannot regulate body functions such as temperature and elimination.
    Transition Period (13 - 20 Days):

    Eyes and ears are open, but sight and hearing are limited. Tail wagging begins and the puppy begins to control body functions.
    Awareness Period (21 - 28 Days):

    Sight and hearing functions well. The puppy is learning that he is a dog and has a great deal of need for a stable environment.


    Canine Socialization Period (21 - 49 Days):

    Interacting with his mother and littermates, the pup learns various canine behaviors. He is now aware of the differences between canine and human societies.

    Human Socialization Period (7 to 12 Weeks):

    The pup has the brain wave of and adult dog. The best time for going to a new home. He now has the ability to learn respect, simple behavioral responses: sit, stay, come. Housebreaking begins. He now learns by association. The permanent man/dog bonding begins, and he is able to accept gentle discipline and establish confidence.

    Fear Impact Period (8 - 11 Weeks):

    Try to avoid frightening the puppy during this time, since traumatic experiences can have an effect during this period. As you can see, this period overlaps that of the previous definition and children or animal should not be allowed to hurt or scare the puppy -- either maliciously or inadvertently. It is very important now to introduce other humans, but he must be closely supervised to minimize adverse conditioning. Learning at this age is permanent.
    This is the stage where you wonder if your dog is going to be a woosy butt all his life. Also introducing your puppy to other dogs at this time will help him become more socialized. If available in your area, a doggy day care is great for this.
    Seniority Classification Period (13 - 16 Weeks):

    This critical period is also known as the "Age of Cutting" - cutting teeth and cutting apron strings. At this age, the puppy begins testing dominance and leadership. Biting behavior is absolutely discouraged from thirteen weeks on. Praise for the correct behavior response is the most effective tool. Meaningful praise is highly important to shape positive attitude.

    Flight Instinct Period (4 to 8 Months):

    During this period puppies test their wings- they will turn a deaf ear when called. This period lasts from a few days to several weeks. It is critical to praise the positive and minimize the negative behavior during this time. However, you must learn how to achieve the correct response. This period corresponds to teething periods, and behavioral problems become compounded by physiological development chewing.

    Second Fear impact period (6 - 14 Months):

    Also called, "The fear of situations period", usually corresponds to growths spurts. This critical age may depend on the size of the dog. Small dogs tend to experience these periods earlier than large dogs. Great care must be taken not to reinforce negative behavior. Force can frighten the dog, and soothing tones serve to encourage his fear. His fear should be handled with patience and kindness, and training during this period puts the dog in a position of success, while allowing him to work things out while building self-confidence.

    Maturity (1 - 4 years) :

    Many breeds' especially giant breeds continue to grow and physically change well beyond four years of age. The average dog develops to full maturity between 1-1 1/2 years and three years of age. This period is often marked by an increase in aggression and by a renewed testing for leadership. During this time, while testing for leadership, the dog should be handled firmly. Regulars training throughout this testing period, praise him for the proper response. Giving him no inroads to affirm his leadership will remind him that this issue has already been settled.

  8. #8
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    Default Even at 11 mths and 30 kgs Chappie is unsure of so much.

    Thanks for the info Bernie,

    Chappie is still uncertain of so much and is relying on his family to reassure him. Making everything light hearted seems to work, even when he is doing something I rather he didn't! We have to remember to 'be present and aware of what he is doing' though.

    We went for another walk in the wind yesterday, but we came home as he was too distracted and alarmed at everything blowing around him. As he matures, windy days won't bother him so much, but we might have to work up to them a bit more gradually. He is still learning about the world.

  9. #9
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    Maggie spooks at unfamiliar things until she has experienced them several times. You may have a sensitive soul whose world shifted unexpectedly. Neither of us can raise our voice near her, she cowers and she has never been threatened or hit in her life. Character building for us..lol
    Keeping it predictable and light is good advice. I am also a fan of just sitting quietly with the dog for a long while in a companiable way for me down at the beach. It is how I forged a bond with Maggie and is still one of her favourite things.
    I would be interested to see how you go.
    Last edited by farrview; 09-03-2015 at 08:12 PM.

  10. #10
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    oh yes, dont forget the companionship of silence shared
    there are mornings, where i sit, and practice mindfulness, at the top of the mountain and wait for sunrise, whilst the dogs do there thing. Bernie is often sat by me, when i open my eyes, just sitting and sharing silence, having approached in silence. Special bonds are made, by being together, especially alone.

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