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Thread: Advice needed - training 3yo maltese x

  1. #1

    Default Advice needed - training 3yo maltese x

    Hi I'm requesting help on behalf of my daughter. She has a maltese terrier x. Her problem is training it to walk on a leash. His behaviour is that he scrabbles on the leash pulling constantly. Cries whenever he sees other dogs and he is not food driven at all so treats do not distract him. He's not a puppy he is 3 years old and everything she tries has not stopped this pattern of behaviour in fact she feels it is going worse. Has anyone any advice for training a small dog?

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    Last edited by Hyacinth; 09-04-2015 at 08:43 PM.

  2. #2

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    Here are some links that may help you with loose lead walking. Practise, practise and practise – very short times to start off with, with lots of treats and praise - then build up the time.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...+leash+walking

    Search Results | McConnell Publishing Inc.

    Search | Dog Star Daily

  3. #3

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    Thanks RileyJ. I especially like the McConnell site!

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,453

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    I'd try skipping a meal or doing training before his dinner. If he's been allowed to eat from a bowl of food when ever he wants - stop that for a while until his behaviour is how your daughter wants it.

    And then you need to find the right treats. Which might be peanut paste on the end of a wooden spoon - cos it's a long way down to a little dog.

    My dog has been on a diet for a while now. I got her checked last night by a vet - just to make sure that easy to feel ribs and bony bits here and there were ok... she's still very musclely... and yes - all good. And she's SO MUCH EASIER TO TRAIN now - cos she's WAY more interested in food.

    When I hear "dog doesn't like food" and it looks like a barrel - I'm thinking - skipping a meal would definitely help cos obviously it likes and gets too much food. Or if it's a skinny dog - just haven't found the right treat. Even someone else's kibble can work, but chicken chip crisps often work, or bits of warm roast chicken, hot bbq sausage. And dogs like bacon as much as blokes...

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I'd try skipping a meal or doing training before his dinner. If he's been allowed to eat from a bowl of food when ever he wants - stop that for a while until his behaviour is how your daughter wants it.

    And then you need to find the right treats. Which might be peanut paste on the end of a wooden spoon - cos it's a long way down to a little dog.

    My dog has been on a diet for a while now. I got her checked last night by a vet - just to make sure that easy to feel ribs and bony bits here and there were ok... she's still very musclely... and yes - all good. And she's SO MUCH EASIER TO TRAIN now - cos she's WAY more interested in food.

    When I hear "dog doesn't like food" and it looks like a barrel - I'm thinking - skipping a meal would definitely help cos obviously it likes and gets too much food. Or if it's a skinny dog - just haven't found the right treat. Even someone else's kibble can work, but chicken chip crisps often work, or bits of warm roast chicken, hot bbq sausage. And dogs like bacon as much as blokes...
    Thanks Hyacinth for your suggestions I'll be sure to pass them on.

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
    Posts
    607

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    I know this might seem like terrible advice, but it would be in your best interests to seek help from an recommended and experienced trainer in your area. I'm not sure if your daughter's dog is a new dog (rescue) or if she has had it since puppyhood but it sounds like your daughter's dog is having anxiety issues and it would best dealt with in person with someone qualified to help you.

    The fact you say it is getting worse means that whatever your daughter is doing is working against her and the dog. I would be working on some obedience in the house first to develop a base line of behaviour. How is she at home usually? Relaxed, pacing, hyper-excited, lethargic?

    Do you have any history on the dog?

  7. #7

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    Sometimes the walking bit is only a small part of the training problem. If your dog doesn't have all of the basics down pat and is good at listening to you without distraction, it doesn't have a hope of listening with distractions.

    She might get some really good results if she begins again - treating her 3yo dog like a puppy and going through all the same steps.

    It's like "re-setting" the dog.

    I did this with a rescue/rehome and the results were slower than that of a puppy, but it made a huge difference.

    Start with Sit, Stay, Come when called (at home) and progress from there. Build on the basics. If the dog doesn't respect boundaries at home, it won't respect the leash out on a walk.

    Please let us know how you go :-)
    Asha - 22/05/15 Wolfhound cross a Dogue De Bordeaux X American Bulldog.

  8. #8

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    Thanks Schnecke :-D

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