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Thread: Concerning behaviour

  1. #1

    Default Concerning behaviour

    Hi guys,
    My daughter decided to buy a Kelpie (6 months) with her now ex-boyfriend and guess where her and the dog are now. She is 17 and working towards moving out around December. I am concerned about her dog as she is only here sporadically and although my partner takes Ruby to the park with our Cavalier (Scarlett, 1yr) she constantly tries to round them up even when Scarlett is disinterested and watching birds. We also take car occasionally of my mothers Cocker spaniel (Milady, 18 mths).

    Ruby regularly knocks into people and has recently knocked over our nearly 3 year old son a couple of times. She bites the back of the necks of the 2 other dogs at the park and will round up anything smaller than her. She behaves better when other big dogs are around to play with but can easily wear them out.

    Ruby has some training and can sit, lay down, beg etc. but we are concerned that her apparent under-stimulation (regularly rips things up in the yard) may lead to an incident with our 3 year old or even our 9 month old. She seems to walk well with the other dogs but will run away when we call her to put her on the lead and we have started to put her on a chain when our son is in the yard.

    I really would appreciate advise and any examples that you may have.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    A bright dog like that needs occupation, training and exercise. I think you may be right in being wary and concerned.I would be.
    The dog is coming into its teenage years and it is very important they learn what is expected in your house and what the house rules are, particularly around children.
    The advice of a good trainer and your daughter needs to take responsibility for the dog or find it a good home.
    Anyway that would be my take.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    How much time do you have to supervise this dog, give it training, mental stimulation.

    I'd be tempted to get it some indian runner ducks - enough that you could swap one group of ducks out for another so they get a chance to have a rest.

    Seems a waste of a good herding dog too - that you'd keep it in a home environment.

    And your 17 yo might want to move out but it's harder to find a rental with a dog than with out one.

    If your 17 yo could walk the every morning for at least 30 minutes but an hour would be better and then do some training with it for another 30 minutes or so or maybe 15 minutes to engage it's brain learning new things... eg shaping tricks and agility foundation and body awareness and stretches... would be great stuff - wear a dog's brain out with training, and you don't end up with super fit bored destructo dog, you get medium fit tired dog hopefully.

    The risk with selling the dog to some random livestock farmer - is if the dog stuffs up it will likely be PTS in the paddock.

    But there are lots of dog sports like herding - is a sport, tracking, obedience, agility that a kelpie would enjoy and a bit of training in any of these every day would help it sleep all day until your 17yo gets home.

    The dog needs jobs to do even if it's just run around the clothesline and then do a long sit stay... all good herding dogs should have an off "button" too, so any time she rounds up something you don't want herded - like your children - you need to go get her, and interrupt the behaviour and give her something else to do. No scolding required, just block, collar grab, relocate dog.

    It's yer choice and collar grab are two games you could look up on youtube. Also anything by kikopup on youtube to get some training.

    If you don't have enough time to train (some games can be trained in front of the telly during the ads), then best to rehome this dog.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    I was your daughter once. It was from this very scenario, that began a lifelong love of working dogs, in this case, a border collie working line.
    I did take responsibility, as my parents view was 'you made this bed, you lie in it'.

    I think as a mother, the more you accept her responsibility, the less inclined she will be to take the responsibility. It does seem that the family have rallied around her. And allowed her dog in. But is she willing to walk/train/exercise/love daily. None of which is negotiable for a healthy herding dog.

    Maybe a life lesson coming your daughters way. To rehome, or Step up to the plate. Harsh, but necessary in order to grow.

    The behaviours you describe, are typical of an unemployed working dog. Its a sad life, unemployment, for any animal, but in particular for a Kelpie
    Last edited by bernie; 07-28-2015 at 05:29 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Lol at bernie...

    My sister did exactly this to my parents... fortunately the dog was smart enough to fit in and both my parents liked taking it for walks. It would fetch a tennis ball until it fell over which was a bit of a hazard tho. And it could climb trees. My sister moved out interstate and never reclaimed her dog. Sad. But it had a good life. It was also scared of sheep so would not be much use on a farm.

    When I got a herding dog - my mum got really angry tho. She thought she was going to end up with another one. No chance.

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the replies guys, I am glad that you have come back with the same stuff that I have been researching. Currently she is going to organise more training and look into dog sports so that her dog is getting what she needs, as long as she commits and follows through we wont be sending her dog away.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Adelaide
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    Thanks for the update Ben. I really hope she comes through for the dog.

    Note - it is much easier to rehome a 6 month old than a 18 month old - so keep a check list chart eg days across and training down the side, and check off each day that she meets the needs of the dog... and if she starts skipping now, then put pressure on to rehome.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Psst - while you can - both you and daughter and anyone else with a "naughty dog" - get in here and learn IYC and Collar grab....

    http://www.brilliantrecalls.com/open...paign=openpage

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