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Thread: Aggressive puppy

  1. #1

    Default Aggressive puppy

    Hi there
    We need some help with our 18 week old border collie who has shocking socialising skills. We have taken him to puppy class where he proceeded to snap at every single doc there that was of his size. Never had an issue with smaller dogs only the bigger ones.'we have another dog at home who is shocking st standing up for himself so basically our collie is the boss. Can someone please
    Suggest ways to help improve him? Has anyone dealt with this before? Please tell me I'm not alone? We have tried the deep yell at him to no resolve

  2. #2

    Default Puppy agression help

    i there
    We need some help with our 18 week old border collie who has shocking socialising skills. We have taken him to puppy class where he proceeded to snap at every single doc there that was of his size. Never had an issue with smaller dogs only the bigger ones, the other dog generally doesn't have to do anything wrong and he has a go at it.'we have another dog at home who is shocking st standing up for himself so basically our collie is the boss. Can someone please
    Suggest ways to help improve him? Has anyone dealt with this before? Please tell me I'm not alone? We have tried the deep yell at him to no resolve

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Hi Dice Mister

    You are not alone.

    He's probably in a puppy development fear period and going through the "I'll get you before you get me" problem.

    Your best way of dealing with this is to prevent the bad interactions and snapping.

    And deep yell (saying "No", yanking on his collar, yelling at him) will make it worse. He will blame the other dog for your attack on him and he will double his efforts to get the other dogs before they can get him (using you as their puppet of aggression).

    The best thing you can do is work at a distance where he can still pay attention to you and reward calm behaviour with praise. See if you can engage him in games of tug - at a distance, and then sneak a little bit closer so he doesn't realise, stop and let him notice, and reward calm behaviour. If he's not calm - don't reward.

    Also don't let him greet any other dog or puppy unless he can be calm. Border collies remember everything - especially bad experiences - so you need to do your best to make sure he has only good experiences.

    He doesn't get up set by little dogs because he doesn't see them as threatening. But anything that is his size (or bigger) - would be like a litter mate - and competition for everything and source of many fights. If he got taken away from his litter too young or the whole lot were just left to fend for themselves - he'd never learn good dog to dog manners.

    But chances are he knows good dog manners and the other dogs in the class are rude.
    You need to protect him from rude dogs.

    https://sarahwilsondogexpert.com/why...-to-hate-labs/

    and

    He Just Wants To Say "Hi!" | Suzanne Clothier

    And puppy development schedule
    Puppy Development Schedule | K9pro Training

    You also need to protect your older dog from your puppy. Interrupt any behaviour you don't want repeated. Just do a simple collar grab (ideally after playing a lot of the collar grab game), and hold him away from your older dog. When he calms down, let him go to see what his choice is. If he goes in for the chomp again, grab his collar again and wait. (no need to scold - be quiet and calm and determined). let him go - see what the choice is - if he repeats, then separate him into another room or if you've done some crate training or have a play pen for him - put him away there. Ie if he chooses to bite your other dog (or you) he chooses to go to his crate / pen for some alone time.

    He's a border collie - he should figure it out really fast. It only takes two collar grabs for my dog to figure out - what she was doing - has to stop.

    Collar grab game - have five really yummy treats and when your puppy is not quite paying attention - grab his collar, say his name and give a treat. He shouldn't freak out - if he does - do a slightly slower and gentler grab - or put him on lead and grab the lead close the collar but not the collar and then gradually work closer to the collar. Then let him go and give him a pat. Repeat. Five times or until the treats are all gone. There's no command for this, or requirement to sit (tho it's nice to get a sit before you let him go - all you really want is "calm").

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    PS merged the threads - more likely to get noticed in the training section but most of us use the "new posts" sections to keep up with the forum.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    Agression is a lot to do with fear....again the lead agression part comes into it which Hyacinth posted a good article for anad also the other stuff posted above. We want our dogs to be friendly to other dogs, so we push them into situations where they are not happy and the more timid ones show this by coming forward in what people believe is agression , but more often is fear.......We need to protect those puppies. Bring them out and show them that no other dog will harm them, we give them space and intially only interact with polite soft dogs and give them time....this is also where BAT type training comes in really handy. make it all positive and give them confidence. Fear often leads to agression and if not taught to be happy in situations it will become a habit.

    It is why I hate the puppy classes where all puppies are left off lead and just allowed to romp...this is hell for the timeid/anxious/worried puppies and they do what they think will protect them and react aggressivelly

    I never pick the puppies up or comfort, but i do give them space and find a soft easy not over the top puppy to start with or adult, one at the time and always with plenty of space for the worried puppy to leave....If we keep pushing for this puppy to be friendly and push all these often over friendly pups/dogs at the puppy they react

    Give space and time.....and reward good behaviour
    Pets are forever

  6. #6

    Default

    I just did a search and - sorry to say - it looks like you are definitely not alone with this type of problem:

    https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sour...+border+collie

    Is it aggression towards everything – people and animals ? Has your pup been like this from the time you bought it home ?

    Please get help with this from a behaviourist/dog trainer ASAP. If you could give us an area where you are, we could suggest someone appropriate for you.

    This problem with your pup needs to be sorted now – otherwise this behaviour will only escalate.

  7. #7

    Default

    He is only like this with bigger dogs, not at all with people or cats. Just bigger dogs than him. We are in Euroa Victoria. Trying to find trainers out here is very hard

  8. #8

    Default

    I am really pleased that the aggression is not towards everything in your little pup’s life.

    ‘Newfsie’ and ‘Hyacinth’ were absolutely correct in saying that the behaviour is fear based.

    There is a behaviourist/dog trainer down your way that could help you. She is a member here on this forum and it would be worthwhile for you to PM, phone or email her for advice.

    Her forum name is ‘Nekhbet’ and her website is as follows:

    InLine K9 Dog Training and Behavior

    Good Luck !

  9. #9

    Default

    separate and supervise.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    And deep yell (saying "No", yanking on his collar, yelling at him) will make it worse. He will blame the other dog for your attack on him and he will double his efforts to get the other dogs before they can get him (using you as their puppet of aggression).
    Sorry that is an old wives tale. No, there is no reason to keep frightening an already stressed and frightened animal at all but that is not what is happening with escalation.

    Dice Mister if you need some advice feel free to contact me via message or email to discuss some options
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

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