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Thread: Dog Training is broken and we have to fix it - article

  1. #1
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    Default Dog Training is broken and we have to fix it - article

    Hi all

    really liked this article...

    Dog Training is Broken — Kindred Companions LLC

    Well guess what... dog training is broken and we have to fix it.

    Every day, dogs are euthanized due to behavioral problems. Dogs that could have had beautiful, joy filled lives are cut short because they couldn't become the dog the owner wanted.

    And it was little to no fault of the dog. It's a fact that it is not overpopulation that is causing dogs to die in shelters. It is the problem of families giving up on animals because they cannot solve their dog's behavioral problems.

    People try their best with the tools they have, i.e.: the experiences and muddled mimicry of the training of their past dogs or the inconsistent, want-results-yesterday expectations that will inevitably doom that dog to fail.

  2. #2
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    Today at the beach - I saw a woman and her daughter being dragged along the beach by a very big and grumpy chocolate Labrador.

    The woman was bitching at the daughter and telling her to stop "being a pill". The daughter was trying to grab the lead. Just as well she didn't.

    I had just stopped Frosty (by distraction and calming pats) from having a go at two poodle crosses (for some reason she doesn't like those much)... and the Labrador - which she also dislikes... decides to have a go.

    Fortunately it was over 20 m away and was still being held by the adult. And clearly there was a reason why it was on lead.

    But instead of dealing with it in a way that would calm the dog down. The woman starts scolding her dog and calling it "Naughty" and "Bad" and yelling at it. And presumably yanking it around by the neck. Guess who the dog is going to blame for that?

    Yes.

    My dog. That's who is going to get the blame for the Lab's punishment. And so guess what is going to happen next time the lab sees a dog like mine.

    Yes.

    It's going to be worse.

  3. #3
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    Good article. As we are back training again it has impressed me ,again, that success comes from me learning how to read her and train through that knowledge. Every time I am the one being trained the dog benefits from that..lol. The problem is the bipeds.

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    Here's another... I think I'm in this food luring trap when it comes to heel work...

    https://awesomedogs.wordpress.com/20...rk-for-my-dog/

    It all comes down to the Bob Bailey trinity. Timing – criteria – rate of reinforcement. While providing feedback at the right moment in time is important, it is equally important to raise expectations in small, measured increments. Too big of a leap and the dog goes from right to wrong. We also need to provide fast feedback in the initial stages of training. Pause too long between reinforcements and the dog checks out, gets bored or would rather be elsewhere.

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    Yes to all of those quotes.........And GOOD socialisation..not throw a heap of puppies together and let them rough play and do what they want to do.....I hate that. We are very intent for our dogs to be social, because a Water Rescue dog that is not friendly is useless.but we do not let our dogs do whatever they want to do, we take control of the socialisation and we do it from 8weeks.....I do pick the areas where other dogs are, such as my Kennel Club where the dogs are vaccinated and the area is clean. i do not listen to the vet and wait till the puppy has had its last vaccinations....I want a social dog, but a controlled social dog, who is polite and soft. I still think good socialisation is often forgotten.

    I have even met some awesome obedience dogs, they trial and win at high levels, that are not very social...and I do not mean let of your dog in the dog park. i mean we can walk together and meet other people with dogs and we can stand there and chat and the dogs can walk along off lead and be polite with us till in charge

    Just like at Water training yesterday..i had three of mine with me at Lilydale lake. they were off lead with our boat and only came in when called or they would mill when we allowed them to come into the group. But there were a lot of either grumpy or out of control dogs there too, but they were there to learn. I just wish that they had been there at 8 weeks when some of ours were (not the rescues of course)...

    teach dogs to be polite and friendly and train all the time everyday every opportunity



    Also there are all these people who wait till the dog is 9-14 months old to fix the problems and want it instant...One lesson to fix my dog, or you take it and fix it.
    Pets are forever

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    Here's a Victoria Stillwell article about why there seem to be more dog aggression now than ever before...

    https://positively.com/victorias-blo...sion-epidemic/

    here's my take on it

    1) A misunderstanding of dog behavior.
    - all that crap since the sixties based on equating dog behaviour to a flawed study of wolves.

    2) Lack of exercise.
    - this would have to apply to everybody. Once a upon a time - kids played outside till it was dark (and then some), mums stayed home with the kids, and everybody went to the park to run around with the dog, or took the dog for a walk... The dogs used to take themselves for walks during the day - in packs of 20 or more...

    3) Poor socialization.
    Puppy mills? didn't happen - puppies got enough time with their litter mates - and later when they took themselves for walks. If something went wrong - usually the dog died, and while that was upsetting - it wasn't seen as the end of the world...

    4) Backyard breeding and poor genetics.
    I think there has always been backyard breeding - but puppy mills - not so much. Both contribute to bad genetics, but back yard breeders generally want dogs to be nice to their humans. Puppy mill farmers wouldn't have a clue about their adult dogs temperaments - all they select for are cute puppies.

    She forgot to mention that one where the dog gets treated like a backyard garden ornament... ie neglect. no training, no socialisation with the human family - let alone other dogs... just get yelled at when there's some barking. Which the dog usually interprets as "joining in" aka approval or applause.

    and the one where people buy a certain breed and expect it, with no training, to be tolerant of rude humans.

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    I'd add ridiculous rules and regulations to the list.

    We are just on a week holidays with the pooches. Apart from the fact that we had to fork out pretty deep to find a rental place that would allow inside dogs to come along, its not easy to make your dog part of your life. There is only one cafe where we can bring the dogs. They are only allowed at the crappy beach and when I yesterday walked into the visitor information to find out any walks or activities where we could bring the dogs the lady just shrugged... genuinely sorry because she owns dogs too.

    I'm not surprised that so many families end up leaving the dog in the yard when they go out because the combination kids and dogs seems to be even more impossible.

  8. #8
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    Here's another about the dog training industry (in the USA)

    https://fearfuldogs.wordpress.com/20...-dog-trainers/

    here at least we have consumer laws - so if the trainer makes promises they can't keep you can ask for your money back and if they won't give it back - you can go to the office of fair trading in your state.

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    As t the getting your money back from the trainer.There should be a clause that says the owner needs to put in a lot of effort too...Some clients expect a magic wand to be waved and presto there unsocialised back yard dog or spoilt dogs is fixed...one hour a week(with the trainer) is not going to fix anything. And they think we do not know that they have not made an effort or even spent any time with the poor dog, I never make promises, i always say "it depends on how commited you are and how much time you will spend with your dog"..... I knw how long it took for one of my Rescues to be relaible and a good dog....So if they do not get the end result, they can get their money back?...I don't think so, i would fight it to the enth degree
    Pets are forever

  10. #10
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    Here is another interesting article about the increase in dog aggression

    https://positively.com/contributors/...th-each-other/

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