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Thread: How to handle this?

  1. #11
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    That's sort of the idea I tried using a regular chain lead, basically using a heavy duty keychain, looping it through itself and clipping it on, but after a few walks like that he was terrified of putting the lead on. Also tends to pull his hair out around that spot - wouldn't be an issue if he didn't pull but alas

    He's definitely better than he used to be though, I'll give him that. My arm used to be in pain after a walk, now it's kind of just him knowing he's in front. I don't mind if he walks ahead if he's not actually pulling

  2. #12
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    He's just so easily distracted by everything, I don't really have any choice but to yank on the lead to get him back to me - but I'm worried he's starting to fear the lead
    I started walking my dog when she was a puppy with a choke chain - the instructors at club said it's safer because your dog can't get out of it. This actually isn't true - she's really good at getting out of it - she just ducks her head while it's loose and she's gone. But anyway I'm dragging her down the footpath by the neck because she's terrified of everything (especially moving cars)... and then when I want to go for a walk - she hides. Massive massive fail.

    If you must get a chain collar get a limited slip collar. (note this one slips on a bit of webbing not chain but it's nice and wide around the throat to reduce damage to the trachea if the dog should launch).
    Sighthound Collar (36-46cm)

    You've got lots of choices besides yanking on the lead but teaching your dog to make good choices means you have to give him the opportunity to make a choice to come back to you (yay, mighty praise)... if he's got the attention span of a gnat - he's going to notice reasonably quickly that he's not going anywhere when you stop and eventually (give him at least 5 to 10 minutes of you just standing there) he's going to try coming back to you - if only for a "what are you doing are you ok gimme a pat" and then you tell him what a good dog he is and take a step in the direction you want to go. If he gets to the end of the lead - you repeat.

    Like I said - it's tedious for the first few walks but most dogs figure it out within three walks. And don't worry about not getting him enough exercise - this will wear his brain out so he will be tired and it's only a few days.

    And it's totally worth it - to have your dog make the choice of his own accord to walk on a loose lead instead of pulling. If you're yanking him back - that's never going to happen.

    Susan Garrett does it a bit differently - she puts her dog in a head halter (after playing games with the halter like put nose through the specially padded nose loop for treats) and uses that to control what her dog is looking at. She directs the dog's head away using the head halter with a grab under the dog's chin, and when the dog is paying attention to her - she loosens her hold and gives the dog an opportunity to MAKE A CHOICE. If he chooses the distraction - she repeats the head turn, wait...

    The more "its yer choice" games you can play with your dog - where he gets to make a simple choice and you reward the choice you like - the better because he's not doing the whatever because you force him - he's making the choice on his own.

    Eg imagine your mum presenting you with shirts to wear - are you going to be happy if she says you have to wear the green shirt and doesn't give you a choice or if she presents you with an ugly shirt and the green shirt and lets you choose.

  3. #13
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    Awesome post, thanks

    I think I'm just being too impatient with him. What I'm seeing as blindly obvious reasons not to pull, he obviously doesn't think the same. I guess I just get a bit annoyed when he completely ignores me to chase a bug, but then I feel guilty afterwards for reacting and yanking on the lead.

  4. #14
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    Wooo, finally feel like I'm making a breakthrough. Made it around an entire block with a loose lead, and without having to tempt him with a treat either

  5. #15
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    Just remember to be completely consistent about it forever. You're allowed to forget one time in five but as soon as you notice the pulling - you gotta revisit the training. A sled dog's instinct is to pull, you will always be working to counteract that. If you could get him a cart (or an esky loaded with ice) and hitch him up - and give him permission to pull - then he would be in heaven.

    So how long did it take him the first time, to come back to loose lead on his own?

  6. #16
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    What I did was basically just stop on the spot, and waited until he released tension on the lead, then kept going while saying "walk". I've been doing this the 2 nights or so before last night, about half way through the walk he seemed to get the idea. After that I only had to stop a couple times on the other half of the walk, and I discretely gave him treats while he was doing the right thing. He was still out in front but the lead was still loose, which I'm happy with. I'm not too fussed about him following exactly by my side, I don't mind him sniffing around a bit, as long as he keeps up with me and doesn't pull

    I have heard about people giving them things to pull, but living in a fairly hot climate even just the walk itself gets him fairly exhausted. But I plan on living in a much cooler climate eventually, so hopefully he'll still be with me when that happens It's also my goal to let him experience snow at some point.
    Last edited by Thingz; 11-30-2014 at 12:53 PM.

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