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Thread: 18 month Labradoodle

  1. #1

    Default 18 month Labradoodle

    I was wondering if people who have experience with labradoodles' wouldn't mind sharing their thoughts on my chance of gaining 'control' over an 18 month 'out-off' control labradoodle.

    I'm not overly familiar with the breed but have been approached by a family who are having trouble with their labradoodle to see if I would like to re-home him. From what I can see the dog is out-off control for two reasons. They are not giving it adequate exercise and they are confusing the poor dog with the training they are attempting.

    I'm far from a dog training expert, I've only had two dogs in my life. A jack russell who I've only had for two years and got as a pup and an English Pointer who I took on as a rescue dog and has sadly passed away recently, hence the reason this family is offering me their labradoodle! My dogs are considered to be well-behaved / well-trained by most people and they think it's because of their training.

    However, I'm not sure if this is the case as all I do is provide my dogs with HEAPS of exercise and provide them with clear, consistent instructions. My question is will my 'training' approach work on a labradoodle who is already 18 months old and hasn't learnt that his human master is the boss. I'm happy to accept the initial period as being a bit tough whilst boundaries are being established but I'm not keen to take a dog on that has little chance of becoming an enjoyable pet.

    Thanks:-)

    p.s also to clarify the out off control behaviour is not aggressive etc just over excited, doesn't obey (confusing instructions!), jumpy and sometime destructive.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 09-23-2014 at 05:38 PM. Reason: put some more spaces between ideas

  2. #2
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    A Labradoodle is not a pure breed, they are a cross between a Labrador and a Standard Poodle. They can inherit any traits from either of those breeds, there is no set list of common traits when it comes to these dogs.

    Any dog can learn new things, no matter how old or young. I'm no expert, but to me the dog sounds like he just needs the right amount of exercise and mental stimulation as well as guidelines to follow. Training him to be a better dog is definitely possible, but not knowing what this dog is like, I can't say how easy it would be.

  3. #3
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    I can't understand why this family is so willing to give up their dog instead of getting some help from a successful dog and human trainer.

    Labradors and poodles are among the smartest most easily trained dogs... but if you don't train and exercise them and you're not consistent... they will take advantage. Ie they will train you. But a dog won't necessarily make decisions in it's long term best interest.

    Eg Stealing the roast off the bench - is great right now - dogs know that. But doesn't really work long term. Dogs don't figure that out without help.

    So my brother recently took on a golden retriever x poodle - most enormous dog. It came from a family that thought it would be a good companion for their special needs daughter who was terrified of it. Cute puppy - enormous out of control teenager.

    It's a lot better behaved now that my brother has it. Not sure I like his training methods - but he makes sure the dog knows what is and isn't acceptable behaviour.

    Exercise is half the journey. The other half is engaging the brain of such a bright dog.

    My questions to you would be -
    if you take this dog on, and you're finding it hard to manage (they can pull really hard) - would you get help or would you try to rehome again?
    if you take on this dog - would the family that you're taking it from - just go get another one and repeat the same mistakes and end up with another impossible dog they don't want. Are you enabling bad dog care by helping them?


  4. #4
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    I reckon some behaviours are harder to train a dog out of if they have been enforced for longer. Jumping can be one of them (I learnt that from experience). But it depends entirely on the dog and also on how willing you are to learn different strategies and apply them consistently. Other behaviours may not be influenced by how old the dog is. They may just require a new start with clear boundaries, some basic training and better care.

    The one thing I personally would be weary about is signs of anxiety. Which sometimes can of course be caused by circumstance and could fade when the environment is improved. But sometimes it can be genetic or so ingrained that it may never get better. And that doesn't make for a pleasant pet. I've no real idea how to tell what potentially problematic anxiety looks like though. But it may be something you might want to research. Or just follow your gut instinct on, if you are that way inclined.

    Good luck, whatever you decide to do. But if you do end up adopting him, I'd love to hear your new dog stories. :-)

  5. #5
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    My mother adopted a young "labradoodle" . This dog was full of energy and loved people and was always running. My mother is not a "trainer" but she has always had dogs and this dog became a well behaved delight. She was however not an anxious dog, just an energetic one that need some boundaries set and plenty of companionship and exercise.

    I would also avoid an anxious or nervy dog.

  6. #6
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    To be honest the biggest problems I see with those crosses is what you're describing - air head, jumpy, flouncy etc. I dont see a problem if the dog doesn't have a major behavioral issue that is dangerous or beyond your capabilities.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  7. #7
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    this is a good article on "teenage dogs"

    Guest Blog - Sue Mccabe, Help I don't like my dog! | Pack Leader Dog Adventures

    It doesn't really tell you how to fix it, but it does go through what you can expect and why so many of them get dumped.

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