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Thread: My beagle won't stop jumping, help !

  1. #1

    Default My beagle won't stop jumping, help !

    Hi all. First post here on these forums.

    I have a male Beagle, he's 8 months old.

    He's a beautiful dog, well natured. The only issue is, that he jumps and won't stop!

    I'm worried i've left it too late and should've trained him from a puppy to stop doing this.

    I understand that he's excited, but it's rather annoying and frustrating.

    He doesn't just jump up like most dogs, he launches himself, and with him being a bigger type of beagle, weighing 25kg, it's not the most exciting thing for us humans when he launches at us.

    I'm currently trying the whole "when he jumps, turn your back to him" sort of thing, but it isn't really working, but I hope it does.

    Is there any other things I can try ?

    I really just want this to stop. I want visitors to be able to come over without being pounced on, it's rather embarrasing.

    Thanks, any advice is greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bunbury
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    1,378

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    We turned and protected ourselves with a knee or forearm and growl loudly and angrily. If there are any visitors the dog needs to be on the lead. If they jump they are removed from the room ( this penetrates as being sociable they do learn some behaviour results in exclusion) But prevention is best hence the lead. The other thing is I have been told (I am not one of the experts) that it is important to tell the dog what you want before they do what you don't. If we get visitors my dog has to sit before any greetings happen. I do this every time I come home and she gets very excited and sometimes that bottom bounces! But she stopped jumping on me. It took longer for her to stop jumping on my husband until he got serious too and she learned it applied to him too.
    Best of luck and definitely not too late.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
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    I feel your pain! My dog is a similar weight and build and used to do the same. None of my friends liked her!

    Have a read here: http://www.dogforum.com.au/dog-train...ng-guests.html

    Never too late, but it does seem to be highly self rewarding for those obsessive jumpers, so it will be harder the more time goes by. See it as a challenge! So best to concentrate on positive exercises at first, like he one in the video in the other post. That will give you and your dog a confidence boost while you lay the foundations for stopping the behaviour. Then you just keep moving the goal posts.

    Though I never was that methodical, but I wish I had been.

    I also described in that post how we dealt with ours jumping on us when we came home, which only took a couple of weeks to stick. Turning our backs or telling her off did absolutely nothing. And she was way too full on to do anything like kneeing her. She also used to do flips, and sometimes landed on her back, when we had her on the lead. Painful memories! But it did get heaps better.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Beloz; 07-18-2014 at 08:33 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    I share your pain. As i have large dogs, i only pet them when all 4 feet are on the floor, and its worked beautifully. then a year ago, we got a mastiff rescue, who was a jumper.
    We tried turning out back, and being decked from behind. At least you would not fear him, as you cant see him forcing you to the ground as his huge bulk lands on you.
    then we tried treating when feet on floor, he jumped us for the food.

    then i rammed my knee in his chest, as he was coming down to land once again to wind him, which i did.
    He never did it again

    This is not positive training. I know. But i got really hurt and bruised and scratched in his jumping. And it was quite literally, a knee jerk reaction of mine.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

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    Nothing worse than a dog jumping up on you as I discovered with Chloe... have a look at the "Dog jumping on guests" thread below this one...good luck.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
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    Bernie, when I got my Banjo I was determined to only use positive reinforcement training. Until the extent of her jumping problem dawned on me. You can't understand until you've had a dog that acts like a living rocket and doesn't respond at all to the garden variety methods that work on most other dogs. I quickly realised that I would need to use deterrents to try lessen the obvious pleasure she gets from launching herself at people. I never really got the hang of the knee trick though.

    But like you, I had to act fairly fast because people were getting hurt. So we started with removing ourselves from the dog if she was about to jump. That worked very well. We tried to get out friends to do the same, but that didn't work. So that's when the spray bottle came to our aid.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

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    When visitors are there keep him on lead until he settles, or put him out if he will not listen. No interaction until he behaves. Big boy pants now.

    Helping the dog understand not to jump - YouTube

    This is to help condition the dog to what you want, what is expected and what behavior will give him attention. Then he has a behavior to offer that will get him attention instead of being ignored and pounding at you because he doesnt understand why you're ignoring him.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

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    When visitors are there keep him on lead until he settles, or put him out if he will not listen. No interaction until he behaves. Big boy pants now.

    Helping the dog understand not to jump - YouTube

    This is to help condition the dog to what you want, what is expected and what behavior will give him attention. Then he has a behavior to offer that will get him attention instead of being ignored and pounding at you because he doesnt understand why you're ignoring him.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

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