Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Dog jumping on guests

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,598

    Default

    My dog goes on lead when there is someone at the front door - friend or stranger.

    And she doesn't get off lead until she shows some self control and even then she might still end up in the crate if she forgets herself.

    And yes - she is very well behaved with me - but it's hard to set clear criteria when guests are not helping. I've got one friend who encourages her to jump all over her and rewards with pats and happy attention even when not invited to jump, and then has a hard time eating her lunch without help. So dog has to go in the crate. And my friend does not get the connection. Scary thing - she would really like a dog of her own.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    No it's not just about jumping on you. It's about YOU doing the majority of the conditioning of how to behave around people. Getting vocal control and showing the dog it's more rewarding to be on the ground calm for attention then jumping all over them. If someone tells the dog 'sit' instead of jumping the dog will sit. Counter conditioning to movement you scale that up to typical chest patting, arm waving, crazy voice behavior and keep reinforcing sit and calmness.

    You cant expect visitors to train your dog, and if your dog values them that highly it wont listen to you and pulls at the it shouldnt be near them until it does listen to you. Otherwise you'll always be on the fence with how good the dogs obedience and attention is.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I just really struggle to coordinate this kind of conditioning. But I know I haven't proofed my dog's sit and stay enough. I watch kikopup do it so very well and I get all excited and then I never get round to doing it because I find it boring. And think it's boring for the dog and I'm way too soft in that regard.

    I'll set myself a goal to proof that sit and stay after our foster dog leaves and before the next one arrives. I might work on some other 'tricks' she can do when greeting people. Just sitting won't stop her urge to lick.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    I just really struggle to coordinate this kind of conditioning. But I know I haven't proofed my dog's sit and stay enough. I watch kikopup do it so very well and I get all excited and then I never get round to doing it because I find it boring. And think it's boring for the dog and I'm way too soft in that regard.

    I'll set myself a goal to proof that sit and stay after our foster dog leaves and before the next one arrives. I might work on some other 'tricks' she can do when greeting people. Just sitting won't stop her urge to lick.
    Dont make it too big an effort. Do it through the course of your normal day, jump around SIT - YES! - Treat ... move on. I tell all my clients

    don't think too hard
    don't try too hard
    don't force yourself

    Training is about living in conjunction with the dog harmoniously. Majority of my clients dont want to do comps so I dont expect them to do hours of set work a week. Plus that's too sterile and you're right, boring. I have to make videos bland so people can understand them but feel free to mix it up.

    A sit can stop the urge to lick if you condition it that way. You can pretty much condition whatever you want to.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bunbury
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    I hate being jumped on. Its rude, if they are outside I will be left with dirt and the dog had shoved itself into my personal space uninvited. A child could be badly hurt if they fall back onto something hard. It was a priority for me due to elderly relatives and our main exercise area being the beach where it is off lead and children appear at random times and places.

    My partner was once sitting in a gazebo eating when a wet labrador from nowhere jumped up and tried to get. his food. Ironically Maggie and I were doing obedience training 5 metres away. So we got very serious about making sure Maggie stopped. For the first month she was on the lead when I answered the door.

    Seriously though it is really important to control jumping....the media fuels dog paranoia and no-one wants their dog labelled dangerous and muzzled etc there are people out there who are very afraid of dogs and will create you a world of trouble if an incident happened.
    Last edited by farrview; 07-07-2014 at 07:25 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I agree Farrview. And Banjo is ok now when we're out walking. She just ignores people now, unless they initiate an interaction. Then all bets are off.

    It's hard for anyone to understand just how high value this type of behaviour is for my dog until you've observed her. Believe me, I did lots of things to try stop her that would've worked on a majority of dogs, but didn't on her. It's akin to dogs that are fiercely reactive to other dogs. You cannot just tell a dog like that to sit to stop them, even if you can get them to sit immediately in every other situation. It requires a strategic plan to get to a point where the dog has some chance of being able to control themselves in those situations.

    When we went to meet Banjo at her foster carer's place, she was so wild that we could not come near her for at least 10 minutes. And even after that, she was a total hazard. No idea at all about private space. She wouldn't just jump, she'd headbutt, jump with her mouth open, nipped while she jumped on occasions and lick you so enthusiastically that it hurt. It was like having a wild animal in the house. So we have come very far since then and it's quite manageable right now. But I'd like to be able to control her without having to resort to the spray bottle. And this post has inspired me (thanks Goggles and Nekhbet!).
    Last edited by Beloz; 07-07-2014 at 11:09 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default

    The very first time I met Chloe I bent over (as I always do with my dogs) to pat her...she suddenly jumped up and hit me in the face and it hurt like hell...Rescue people said "don't bend over to pat her as she will jump up on you" now they tell me.

    Chloe as I found out was a jumper and so began the nightmare...I had very little experience with this behaviour as mine didn't jump...Tara did but it was rare and she was gentle. Chloe was like a speeding train and would hit you hard...I had long scratches both front and back and a few bruises too.

    I didn't know if this was the result of lack of training when young or this is the way she is... most likely both so what do I do ? Well when she jumped up I would turn push her away and say in a loud voice "no jumping" and "bad girl no" and I did use the good old spray bottle sometimes I know this sounds stupid but over time Chloe stopped jumping up to the point it's now rare...thank God. I don't know if it was the way I handled her or the fact she is now mature and knows better...maybe a little of both.
    Last edited by Dogman; 07-17-2014 at 03:20 PM.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goggles View Post
    I was actually thinking about getting a pug before I got Temujin... I feel now I should have gotten the pug. Or a bulldog.
    Well i have a bulldog and trust me they still jump! And bite! she's still just a puppy but i'm really trying to train her that jumping up, barking and biting hands and shoes is just not on. So far the techiques we've used are the Victoria Stillwell 'Ahh Ahh' sharp and loud, a couple of loud claps, turning around arms folded and ignoring her, time out in her room if she gets too bitey and also the ocassional spray bottle. It does work and she eventually calms down in each situation but I'll need to keep doing it for a while before the behaviour stops completely.

    The spray bottle is so effective that usually you just have to wave it and she stops. I think because the first time I sprayed her she turned at the wrong moment and it went straight up her bottom! LOL that gave her a shock. But its all about consistently keeping up the training.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,598

    Default

    Bitey - I push until it becomes slightly uncomfortable and puppy spits me out. Susan Garrett - freezes and holds really still (despite the pain) and becomes as boring as possible - which might not work on a dog that will also chew furniture. The main thing is to take the fun out of it. Coating your bitten bit with aloe vera will also reduce biting cos it tastes horrible. A little bit wiped on is ok - a whole cactus would make a dog sick.

    Jumping - goes nicely with collar grab. So I get hold of collar, and hold the dog away until it calms down, and then let go to see what choice it makes... repeat as necessary. Jumping - is quite fun even if you are still. Eg jumping on the furniture and agility equipment and sand dunes and bmx track is also fun. So turning around and being boring doesn't always work.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I did some serious thinking and watched that video again. I'd watched similar training videos when Banjo was young and much worse with the jumping, but I think I just had no confidence in the method because she was 10 times as bad as that dog in the video.

    With what I know now, I really, really wish I had done this sort of training with her when she was still jumping up on us. Now it'll be harder because:
    1. The behaviour has been enforced for much longer now
    2. She now behaves differently around us than around strangers, so it will be harder to transpose this to all situations. I get your point about conditioning a reflex type response, but I think we will have to proof this with people outside of the family eventually.

    But we're starting from scratch.You can teach an old dog new tricks...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •