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Thread: We need help!

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    I highly recommend kikopup too. Her videos are a joy to watch, so it makes research a breeze. She's much better at training than most of us will ever be but you don't have to be perfect at it to get big results.

    I joined this forum when I got my second dog and I wanted to learn. And I did learn so very, very much. It is worth doing some browsing and checking out some of the linked resources people recommend. I personally recommend the book "Chill out, Fido!" to everyone because it gives a great introduction to dog behaviour and training methods and the actual training exercises are explained in minute detail. Even if you don't do the exact same exercises (though they all sound very useful), they are a good demonstration of how dogs learn. Which I think is really very logical but not at all intuitive to most humans.

    Training doesn't have to be a chore either. Especially if you keep thinking of the end goal. I was only thinking this morning how glad I am that I put in the effort and have such a very obedient dog. It makes life so much easier.

  2. #12

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    It sounds like the problems are with general obedience? You're not having aggression or separation anxiety are you? If it is "just obedience" its simply a matter of lots of hard work - reading, google, youtube.

    Try a few things 'til you find a style which suits you. I would also suggest a trainer who can kick start you off. But shop around. Look for a class or trainer who is right for you. I am very lucky that I have a fantastic trainer who runs casual classes - once a week for a fee I believe is reasonable. I have tried other classes where I didn't quite like the structure or personality. Lots of places will let you pop in (without your dog) to watch a session. Lots of trainers will offer you a one on one to kick start some training.

    I googled your town and found this place -http://www.meadwaymutts.com

    but what I would really recommend is asking on Facebook or calling your vet (or local vets) and pet supply shops / produce stores to ask if they recommend someone.

    From there - its just an awful lot of work. Try walking with small staining sessions built in. Randomly asking for a sit or a drop (once its learnt)

    To share a personal story - I have a foxie but I have had big dogs too - My boy is very obedient but since moving up a class at training he has decided that he will not "stay". Its just not his cup of tea - so we're back to basics. We randomly ask for sits while on a walk. I randomly ask for a drop. I will halt a game of fetch for some sits and drops - he knows the faster its done - the faster we get back to playing. Looks like I'll have to build stay into the lift of things to do while out walking (its so much harder when its cold and dark early).

    Another thing we had to do was set really solid ground rules. While its just hubby and I - I found that my expectations were different to that of my hubbys and that he was giving Scottie different hand signals and commands to me (Scott is very driven by hand signals - more than verbal cues). To help with this a friend gave me an old set of these flash / cue cards
    Mutts with Manners - Puppy Training and Dog obedience training, Sydney

    We have the whole set - and the best thing about them is - they're the agreed upon "rules" all humans in the house are on the same page. It's been a real help.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,581

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    he would never stay if there was a distraction not in a million years, and our kids arent even allowed near him when he is off a lead
    Ooh that's easy... you put him on lead - in front of his dinner - ask for the stay... and ask the kids to be distracting - as far away as they can be and him still notice them... If he gets up, put him back and ask for the stay again - start with really short stays in the face of a distraction....

    Ie you set up the training scene (environment) so you have control over the dog and what choices he can make - if he's on lead he can choose to get up or stay - and you can reward appropriately but he can't actually get as far as jumping on the kids. So he learns the "rewarding" choice is to stay - no matter what the kids are doing.

    And if he can do it with them over there... reliably (four out of five times), then move the kiddies a bit closer and repeat. Progress the difficulty only as fast as the dog can get the task right. If he gets up every time and isn't figuring it out, the kids are just a little bit too exciting so move them a little bit further away or just out of sight or slightly quieter...

    Work out how long he can stay or how close before he gets distracted - and these are "thresholds" in this location. Only change one variable at a time (ie one session/dinner - work on one variable - one of duration, distance, location etc). Always break it down to baby steps.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

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    Alanah19,

    Welcome to the forum...you have chosen a wonderful breed but as you now know they require a lot of training and must start when you get him (8wks) not 12 mths...you're not in big trouble it's just going to be much harder.

    Rotties love kids and being large they can knock over small children and you too when they get excited...so training is a must. I took my Rottie Opal (God rest her soul) to obedience training run by the Rottweiler club of NSW a few years ago. The first thing I was told was Rotties don't like to be forced...be firm and gentle and use treats....take things slowly otherwise they refuse to do it. Rotties don't mature till three years of age...they are family pets and must be made part of the family...that means being in the house with you...a Rottie kept outside or any other breed is asking for trouble.

    You need someone who owns and understands this breed to show you how to handle and raise him correctly... because you can't train a Rottie like a GSD as I found out myself. I don't think there's a Rottie club in your state which makes it hard...I have found this breed to be loyal,loving,very Intelligent and great big sooks. The only bad thing about Rotties is they are not a long lived breed 8/10 yrs and cancer claims many of them anyway all the best with you boy.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  5. #15

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    You can also get support via the phone - no where near as good but still an option.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    tasmania
    Posts
    266

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    If it helps the lady who runs the dog training school I put a link to owns a Rotty as well.
    If you think dogs can't count, try putting three dog biscuits in your pocket and then giving Fido only two of them. ~Phil Pastoret

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkandz View Post
    If it helps the lady who runs the dog training school I put a link to owns a Rotty as well.
    It certainly does...you'd be surprised how many people are scared of Rotties even vets. Some people will tell you how dangerous Rotties are...they are vicious devil dogs who kill and eat children...they have something wrong with their brain and will suddenly snap and turn on you and rip your throat out. All of these comments were made by people who have never owned one of these loving dogs and lets not forget the Media.

    At all breeds training the person with the Rottie is usually the one right at the end of the line and no one goes near them...so it's very important that the "Instructor" has some knowledge of this breed...better still owns one...as some "Instructors" are scared of them too.
    Last edited by Dogman; 06-18-2014 at 08:48 AM.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    It certainly does...you'd be surprised how many people are scared of Rotties even vets. Some people will tell you how dangerous Rotties are...they are vicious devil dogs who kill and eat children...they have something wrong with their brain and will suddenly snap and turn on you and rip your throat out. All of these comments were made by people who have never owned one of these loving dogs and lets not forget the Media.

    At all breeds training the person with the Rottie is usually the one right at the end of the line and no one goes near them...so it's very important that the "Instructor" has some knowledge of this breed...better still owns one...as some "Instructors" are scared of them too.
    Rotties are great I have 2 of them. But they need a lot of discipline a lot of training and the training is ongoing too. mine are both 18 months old, and im still training them. But they are AMZING companions, that are very Loyal and loving.
    My Babies!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    3,082

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    something ive found in common with all my rotties, that the words "good dog" interrupted correct behaviour. They dont seem to do well with mid task praise.
    so when you say sit, drop stay...and when you say good dog, it thinks that means it can move again. That one is simple, your dog has yet to be trained in the stay. "Triangle of temptation"

    How many times are you putting your dog that has moved, back on the exact spot it moved from and MAKING him do it right. No praise either. It got up remember! Raise the bar. Expect more, You've got a smart dog. Use it.


    Ive owned a lot of rotties, ive never owned one that could be trained/exercised 'every other day'. sorry love. This wont cut it for a rottie IMO.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    This isn't the oldest basement thread to be bumped but Alanah hasn't been in since a couple of days after she made her last post - ie around June 17th...

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