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Thread: Indoor training, and barking issue

  1. #1

    Default Indoor training, and barking issue

    Hi guys,

    i'm new to the forum, however we got a new dog around 8 months ago (just over 1-year-old gordon setter) that we are wanting to house train. He has primarily been inside on a leash only at night due to Dad being quite ill, however as Dad has unforunately passed, we have been letting him in without a leash the past two weeks.

    He is very reluctant to settle down inside, particularly at night, and has learnt some bad behaviours over the past few months of our own doing, because training just hasn't been the top priority. The only main issue inside is his constant need to be on top of the kitchen benches. The problem is that he is very persistent, so it is constantly getting up and down most of the night to get him out of the kitchen. Any chance he gets, he'll be in there. The benches are cleaned and free of food, so there's nothing he can see or get, but obviously the smell is there for him. the kitchen is open-plan into the dining room so there's no door, however we have tried a gate which he easily jumps. If the kitchen wasn't there, he'd be fine. So far, I have been rewarding him when he stays out of the kitchen, sits down outside of the kitchen, etc. Any positive behaviour that he does while we're in the kitchen and he is not. I have also been herding him out of the kitchen every time he goes in, which is generally a constant occurrence every time he is inside. Does anyone have any other tips that I could use to help keep him out of the kitchen?


    Harry also barks constantly at anything and everything only at night if he is outside, so that is the main reason he has to be brought in at night. I've not been able to find anything in particular causing the barking, however I am not sure how to stop that other than by bringing him inside, which I think is promoting the barking as well. Any tips for solving this?

    As for his routine, he is walked twice a day, fed twice a day, and sleeps in my bedroom so he is confined at night. He's definitely a lot more active at night, however he probably needs a lot more exercise and stimulation during the day, so we are getting him back into night time training classes, and hopefully some agility training later down the track. We have another dog, Meka (staffy) who is very good inside and well behaved.

    Thanks everyone!


    Alex
    Last edited by Narny105; 04-29-2014 at 08:11 PM.

  2. #2
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    How did we miss this post. Sorry about that

  3. #3
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    ordon Setters can be ballistic. Really super energetic.

    Counter surfing - how is he getting from your bedroom to the kitchen for counter surfing?

    The best thing you could do is limit his access in some way - but I know how hard that is. I have the occasional counter surfer myself. She likes to check for crumbs after I sit down with my dinner - so I sometimes shut the door to the kitchen area - which also contains her water unfortunately, but while I'm eating and don't want to make sure she's being good - I shut the door.

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    The other thing I have been known to do - tho the reward based trainers frown on this - is to line the edges of the kitchen counters with stacks of tin cans. Balance them a little precariously on the edge so if the dog puts her paws up to sniff... she's got a good chance of knocking some cans off. I'd also be tempted to make a rope gate with rattly cans ie if the dog brushes past there's some noise or use a motion sensor alarm like a remote door alarm

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    If you put the speaker bit on the bench too - the sound might repel the dog. You can get motion sensor door bell thingies that shop keepers often use to alert them when someone has come into the shop. Battery operated. It will go off when you go back to the bench but the dog is not sneaking a bit of counter surfing in without drawing attention and the faster you can interrupt the behaviour the better.

    The other thing (also not entirely welcomed by the - manage your environment reward based trainers) is I sometimes smear the edges of the bench with vicks vapour rub, because sniffing that stings a bit and discourages further investigation.

    I'm pretty much ok with harmless self inflicted punishment for dogs, ie if they do something naughty and the consequence is immediate and unpleasant... hopefully they will make the right connection in their brain and not repeat the behaviour. And they won't blame you either.

    The other thing I've been thinking about doing but haven't yet is installing viber on my phone and computer and then rigging my phone up on transmit (over the home wireless network) to the computer and then I can talk to my dog and see her when she comes a counter surfing...

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    sorry about breaking my post up but I think I found the crack in this web site server hard drive.

  7. #7

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    Maybe crate train the dog so that he is confined at night - even in your bedroom if necessary. At least then you'd both get a good nights sleep

  8. #8
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    Hyacinth seems to have all the counter surfing ideas covered so I'll leave that alone

    Might I ask how this dog barks outside at night if he is confined to your bedroom? Do you mean in the evening when he has access to outside? If so, I'd be preventing outside access. I would take him out to the toilet every couple of hours (unless you know his usual schedule, then do that). Take him to where you want him to go and be boring, wait for him to go and then praise. If he is shy about going on lead, try using a longer lead to give him space from you to do his business.

    If he starts barking at something out there, I would walk him away from where he is looking while reacting, to increase the distance from the stimulus. It could be that there are noises like birds, bats, possums, etc that he is not used to causing him to alert you and hopefully scare it away.

    Has your dog started acting up more since your dad has passed?

    P.S. Sorry for your loss. I lost my dad when I was 17. It was unexpected. My heart goes out to you.

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