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Thread: How to teach drop it/fetch?

  1. #1

    Default How to teach drop it/fetch?

    Hi I have a 5 months old puppy and she won't play fetch or drop it. She will chase it and bring it back but she won't drop it. She knows what drop it means but she won't do it, she will only drop it and play fetch if I have ham treats. I have tried everything from having two balls and trading it, trading for treats, running away from her when she brings it back, enthusiastic encouragement and plenty of other things that don't work. Need some help please!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Gold Coast
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    1

    Thumbs up Drop it/fetch

    The best advice I can give is keep practicing! Don't give up on your puppy just yet. Use the ham treats and make sure to reward your puppy with TLC and a good pat every time he/she gets it right. Once your dog is completely used to the 'drop it' game, try to start playing 'fetch' without the treats. If your dog will not drop without the treats, go back to step one. Keep training and rewarding your puppy every time you get the chance. Your canine friend will eventually learn the concept after much hard work and training. Hope I was helpful!!
    Good Luck! ,

    Lali

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,599

    Default

    She knows what drop it means but she won't do it, she will only drop it and play fetch if I have ham treats.
    Try to get more intermittent about handing out the treats. Again - start in a small area where you have control.

    So the first five times you might use "luring" ie as she comes back with the toy (doesn't have much choice in a small space),
    you put your left hand out for the toy and pick a treat up with your right hand. As she drops the toy and you have it in your left hand, then give her the treat. Make sure
    she takes it nicely or don't let her have it.

    When she's spitting the toy out for treat, then start adding the clue "Drop it" - note my dog would get confused because for her "Drop" means "lie down"
    *after* she hands over the toy - then hand over the treat. Do not get the treat out or pick it up until after the toy is handed over.

    So after five treats - pack the game up and just have a play. Push her round a bit (gently) or invite her to chase you or a toy on a string and a bit of tug if she will.

    Then try the drop it and treat again. start rewarding only for the better perfomances ie quicker dropits or whatever your criteria is.

    Only run the training session for a couple of minutes or 5 treats or so - which might be less than a couple of minutes depending on how fast she catches on. With puppies, less is more - you don't want to incorporate bored or naughty behaviours.

    that's why it's good to have a few games to learn at any time...
    Jdogz11 - you might want to look up "its yer choice" on youtube...
    and then you can play its yer choice with the ham treats - ie the dog only gets some if she pays attention to the game and not whether or not there is a treat on offer. I will make my dog do fetches right past her open bowl of dinner - I'm usually close enough to stop her from detouring for a snack on the way by but for some reason interrupting her when she gave in to temptation - seems to be a stronger lesson and she tries harder to get the fetch up to scratch the next time.

    And I don't push it, if she does a really nice fetch - she gets her dinner. I resist the temptation to see if I can get that again, unless really nice fetches are now the norm (not yet).

  4. #4

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    May I ask why you want the dog to drop the retrieve rather than give it to you?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,599

    Default

    Good luck getting a reply from OP - they haven't been back since end of March.

  6. #6

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    Constant good appraisals in high/rewarding tone of voice always gets their attention and understanding to your command and a 'questional' tone of the word NO, when your dog is NOT cooperating. Like all dog lovers/trainers would commonly suggest, continue to practice with patience, repetition and persistence will eventually resides to good results.

    Good luck!

    From: Natasha - LoveWalkPaws.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,599

    Default

    Thread closed.

    Forum ettiquette - it is polite to read the whole thread before posting so that you take into account all responses before posting and not post in a thread that is very old - unless it's a general thread about jokes or favourite dogs or something.

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