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Thread: dog walking

  1. #1

    Default dog walking

    does my dog have to walk behind me or beside me when I am out walking him?

    my pup is almost five months old now, i took him to an off leash dog park, ran around like crazy, ran into and almost knocked over a poor middle aged woman walking her two dogs, ran off with someone elses cricket ball but gave the ball back as soon as the owner of the cricket balls large dog came over, instantly became best friends with the large dog, freaked out a few people and tried to walk off with the owner of a small french bulldog x.

    i walk my dog once or sometimes twice every day and obedience classes start next month.

    is he going to grow out of this or what am i doing wrong?

  2. #2

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    Your dog should be walking on a loose leash , preferably beside you , never pulling ahead or lagging behind. These are few things you have to consider before just letting your puppy run around off leash in a public area :

    Is your dog socialized enough that he or she will not be fearful of or aggressive towards other people and dogs. Can you trust your dog not to jump on people (especially children), chase joggers, fight with other dogs, pick up garbage, invade picnic lunches and so forth? Unsocialized and skittish dogs will often bolt if something frightens them.



    Can you control your dog off the leash? Will your dog reliably come when called and stop on a dime from a full run when told to stay? These commands are essential for your dog's safety. Some dogs when let off leash will simply run away. Other dogs will chase a tennis ball or cat right into the street.

    If you are willing to risk the safety of the public, the safety of your dog and the security of your finances (paying your own or someone else's medical or veterinary bill, facing a lawsuit, etc) then you'll let your dog off-leash before someone who is not willing to take the risks.

    If you are unwilling to take the risk, only let your dog off-leash in areas where the above mentioned risks do not exist. A fenced-in dog park is ideal. Tennis courts are usually completely enclosed. Your dog may not come when called but at least you can just go and get him or her when it's time to leave. If your own yard is not large enough, find a friend or neighbor with a yard where their dog and yours can get together to run and play.

    Use a long leash on outings to give your dog some freedom but still allow you to maintain control. Work on his recall as well and proof his recall for different situations so that he will come back to you no matter what the temptation is. If he does a unwanted behaviour , call him and if he doesn't come , pull the long leash and then reward him when he is in front of you.

    Source : Google

  3. #3

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    'goggles' - some links for you !

    http://www.dogforum.com.au/puppy-dis...-calendar.html

    English | Dogmantics Dog Training

    Free Video List | Dogmantics Dog Training

    kikopup - YouTube

    Knowledge Base | Steve Courtney Dog Training

    Look at 'loose leash walking' videos.

    You need to train your pup to walk properly on leash - they won't grow up and all of a sudden do it ! Your pup needs to see you as the best thing ever and want to be by your side.

    This all takes training and treats when the pup does what you want. I don't like parks - for many reasons - but if you pup is not trained appropriately and has good recall - the pup looks on you as the 'fun police' !

    Really pleased that you are going to go and do dog training. When my new pup arrives - that is where I will be going also - puppy school and then obedience training.

  4. #4

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    he doesn't pull ahead but he does like to walk in front of me, is that alright? is he 'being dominant' the way some sites and cesar milan will tell you?

    the recall worked just fine until several weeks ago. in fact, lately he's been acting like a complete lunatic but i'm hoping he will grow out of this.

    and do i have to walk through a doorway before my dog does?
    Last edited by goggles; 01-17-2014 at 07:12 PM.

  5. #5
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    Forget about the whole 'where you are in relation to your dog' affecting 'dominance'. I think it's still BS. I don't demand that my dog walks right next to me, as long as the lead remains slack. Some like to have their dog in perfect heel position but I see it as just a preference.

    The door thing... It is good practice to let your dog sit and wait till you give a cue before you allow them to go out, but that's just for safety. If that is drilled into them they might be less likely to bolt out and across the road. Dogs are also fine with having different rules for different doors. So maybe let your pooch sit before you open the front door but don't bother about the back door. That last one is just preference too. I couldn't care less if my dog pushes in front of me to get to the backyard. But we had issues with the front door because our entry is very narrow and if she tried to get through the door before I'd fully opened it, it would kind of get stuck against her body. Lol!

    Your dog will most likely grow out of some of the behaviours at the dog park you describe. But he'll do it faster if you help him through training.

    Now with recall though, dogs never grow out of not coming when called! It takes consistent training for a very long time with most dogs to get a truly reliable recall. It is what I dedicate most of my training time with my dogs with. Because I love walking them off lead and obviously want them to be safe. I do train this off leash often but only away from roads and wildlife, etc. And it depends very much on the dog. But I don't find recall training much of a bother when I do it on our daily walks.

    There's quite a few threads about recall here already. I know I have had quite a few rants about it, so I won't repeat. If you can't find these threads though, let me know and I can do a search or give some resources. Forget about the dominance thing, train recall, recall and recall! (Just my view)

  6. #6

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    @luckycow:

    he does walk on loose leash, at least most of the time. he just does it in front of me.

    my dog was really aggressive and fearful towards other dogs and people when i got him so much so that he was growling and lunging at everyone outside the immediate family. maybe that's just a puppy thing though? he's not like that at all now. he will jump on everyone, especially children, he might chase joggers, he probably won't start fights and he will definitely pick up garbage and invade picnic lunches. i don't really think it's a good idea to have a picnic in an off leash dog park anyway.

  7. #7
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    My dog was terrible with the jumping on kids when she was young. I got very good results with LAT (Look At That) for that. I was quite amazed she improved so much in a fairly short time. 2 years later I still have to be on the ball though. If I see a toddler approach on walks, I call my dog and if necessary make her heel or sit until the child is a safe distance away.

    I remember another thing I used to do with mine when I just got her was to always call and treat if I spotted a jogger. Didn't take too long for my dog to start asking me for treats if she saw the jogger first.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by goggles View Post
    @luckycow:

    he does walk on loose leash, at least most of the time. he just does it in front of me.

    my dog was really aggressive and fearful towards other dogs and people when i got him so much so that he was growling and lunging at everyone outside the immediate family. maybe that's just a puppy thing though? he's not like that at all now. he will jump on everyone, especially children, he might chase joggers, he probably won't start fights and he will definitely pick up garbage and invade picnic lunches. i don't really think it's a good idea to have a picnic in an off leash dog park anyway.
    My dog is about the same age as yours. She's 6 months old now. I let her walk ahead of me sometimes too ,as long as she is not pulling /straining on the leash I'm okay with that About doorways , i do make her sit first before give her the okay cue , and then she rushes out /in the door haha. But sometimes I just let her go first .As for my dog she is overly friendly and jumps all over visiting dogs and kisses everyone . I have never let her off leash in public yet as I feel that I cant trust her on her recall or her 'leave it'.She puts everything in her mouth too. Must be a puppy thing? She barks as joggers ,people with weird dressing etc. I think these are all just things that we have to work on ,it takes time , and hopefully eventually they will grow up to be well behaved doggies

    Oh and I really like kikopup's approach on training dogs. I watched all her videos ,she's great
    Last edited by Luckycow; 01-17-2014 at 09:23 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by goggles View Post
    . i don't really think it's a good idea to have a picnic in an off leash dog park anyway.
    LOL, couldnt agree more. Thats asking for trouble or at least asking for unwanted hungry visitors !

    I've been slack with my Bronxy. Just last night we took both dogs to the beach. The wife got the 'easy' loose lead walker (Mojo) and i got the pleasure of getting dragged to the beach by Bronx. Even using a check chain i struggled big time. 2 things i'm going to try tonight...... a pocket full of treats and a much shorter leash. If we don't get much progress in a week or 2 i'm going to try a harness for him. I have one but getting it on him is a bloody nightmare.
    I sound like a hypocrite ... but be patient and consistent ... and best of luck.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  10. #10
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    Sean, the treats will help once he understand what he is supposed to do, but with our just foster I first had to do the 2 steps forward, one step back exercise. Whenever there was tension on the lead, I'd take a step back and drag her with me. Until the lead went slack and then I'd immediately step in the direction where she wanted to go again with an excited "Yay, let's go!". Really got me in a very bad mood after doing that for 30 minutes. But even though she wasn't the smartest of dogs, she did get it after a while. That's when I started giving treats too and soon she would start asking for treats when she walked on a slack lead. This dog only weighed 19kg and I already struggled with holding her back sometimes! I think I'd just let go of the lead if it was attached to one of yours trying to get somewhere fast!

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