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Thread: mouthy puppy

  1. #1

    Default mouthy puppy

    pup is well behaved but when other people come into the room he gets excited and jumpy and mouths like crazy. i do not want him putting his teeth on anyone at all ideally. i have had some problems with him mouthing before, what can i do to get him to stop?

  2. #2

    Default

    'goggles' - there are heaps of threads on this forum regarding your question !

    Have you done some searching on this forum ? Or is it just easier to ask - short and sharp questions ?


    Or is your question very specific ?

    The problem is that pups jumping up on people is an universal problem - they all do it! The thing is - you the owner need to train your dog not do it !

    Very simple !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    melbourne
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    372

    Default

    i farly sure mouthy meaning bitey/nippy.
    generally puppy dominance.

    way i taught my pup was the old thumb in mouth trick and hold bottem jaw so he couldnt close mouth... lol
    get him to play and when he starts getting mouthy, put thumb between lower 2 k9 teeth, and gently hold his lower jaw, he cant close it unlesss u let go, eventually they think about it and stop play biting.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Bunbury
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    Default

    If our pup got mouthy my husband made a deep growly noise, she got it very fast.
    Didn't work for me just couldn't get my voice deep enough but she did get it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    melbourne
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    yeah, i got the growl for my second dog, worked like a charm if u know how
    problem was.. most time it was a one shot wonder..... 100% effective... growled at anything... even just a hasty growl without thinking.... they never did it again...
    pup went for a swim in fish pond..... all i saw was a huge bit of water flying past window... thought what the... went out to a happy puppy wiggling at me tummy deep in water... growled at them... they dived out of water doing the oh please forgive me i wont do that again run/crawl over to me for forgiveness.

    to learn this...
    spend time with a bitch thats weaning puppys lol

  6. #6

    Default

    nice responses, im gonna try the thumb in mouth/lower jaw thing. and maybe work on a growl. in regards to my original post, i mean how do i control a really overexcited or hyper dog?

    it happened at the vet, usually he so calm and sweet. obedience classes?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

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    I wrote a long rant because I struggled a lot with this one with my own dog. She's now 3 and I still have to manage her closely with other people (no issue with her own humans, just others). She has got much better but she really was a total nutter in this regard. I remember her flipping over and landing on her back a few times when I pulled her back with the lead when she tried to "launch" herself at some stranger! She was about 8 months when I got her and this was my biggest training issue.

    This is what I've learnt works best:
    1. avoid self-reinforcement: use whatever method you can to avoid your pup jumping in the first place. Spray bottle squirt in the face, leaving a lead attached to him so you can easily pull him back and put him in time-out, or whatever works for you - use trial and error to find out. At places like the vet, I play tree. I just stand dead still with the dog straining on the lead and don't budge. Can be a bit hard if it's a small space because obviously you need to avoid they can actually get to anyone or anything! As soon as they stop pulling and carrying on like a pork chop, I relax and start walking further into the room. If there's any attempted jumping or mouthing we go back to the boring spot and repeat. Try to never allow your dog to get anything or anywhere they want by displaying lunatic behaviour.
    2. Reward calmness. Reward your dog lots for lying or sitting down calmly. Do this at home and when you're out and about. The more distractions there are, the more often you should reward calm behaviour. It works really well on some dogs if you do this consistently for a while. Just randomly toss treats between their paws when they look calm and relaxed, but not when they are begging for it. I usually wait till they put their head on their paws or floor before I toss a treat.

    If you like reading books on topics like these, I can recommend "Chill out, Fido". I do regret not making more of an effort to do that sort of training when my dog was younger. I got the book when she was older and the training exercises didn't seem that relevant anymore, but I should have still done them. I might read it again and maybe I'll be inspired to start again.
    Last edited by Beloz; 01-13-2014 at 10:20 AM.

  8. #8

    Default

    Has been interesting to watch my current litter grow up - with a very dedicated mum. She is still teaching them bite inhibition, and how to play. And she is fair but firm. She also breaks up any squabbles by knocking over the offending pup. If they climb on and bite her they get a growl. If they continue she knocks them over, or jumps away from them so that they fall off.

    They are currently 10 weeks old...

    There is one particularly mouthy boy. He is getting better from spending time with her so what she does must work. When he has mouthed at my arm or hand I usually push it gently back into his mouth so that it is uncomfortable. Then he happily spits it out.

  9. #9

    Default

    Santos is a 13 week old English Staffy and is quite mouthy/nippy eg. Play bite fingers etc. However, it only seems to be to me as when we walk and someone wants to pat him, he behaves in a different sense and doesn't do it at all (except one guy who he thought he would have a little nip on his finger). I don't know whether he has recognised who I am (the master) and he thinks he can get away with it from me, or he just hasn't had the chance to do it to anyone else.

    Another thing Santos loves doing (again, seems to be only to me) is when I'm wearing jeans, is to bite the lower leg of the jeans and play tug-of-war with the jeans, as my leg provide a firm base/opponent to play this game with.

    Both actions are of my concern as I don't want him growing up thinking he can bite mine, or anyone else's fingers as a play toy, nor think the jeans thing is ok. Staffy's being notorious chewers, I understand his desire, but is this something he will naturally grow out of, or should I be working hard to change his ways?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,602

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    Eli03

    Just unhook him from his pant leg and hold him by his collar until he figures out that he's not doing that right now. When he's stopped chewing bits of you and is looking for something else to do - praise that - and let him go and see what he does. If he latches on again - repeat the (gentle) collar grab and hold.

    Don't just let him keep chewing, interrupt and stop it, give him something else to chew - cow hoofs are great for this.

    It's really important that anything he does that you don't want him doing especially when he's full sized, you interrupt it and give him something else to do and remember to catch him doing the right thing like playing tug with a rope toy (not your jeans) and praise and encourage that.

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