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Thread: Cesar Millan method a success!

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    Default Cesar Millan method a success!

    For my birthday my Mum got me series 3 of Cesar Millan's Dog whisper show. I've been watching it heaps, it was very interesting to see him work with an Aussie who had basically exactly the same issues as Koda just more extreme. I thought to myself "why not give Cesar's method a go to see if it works with Koda."
    I tried out the method of doing the 'chhtt' sound with a quick correction via a tug on the leash or a tap on the neck/shoulder area whenever Koda starts to show signs that he is going to react to something. I am almost in disbelief of how effective this is, and i almost feel like i've been doing this the wrong way for Koda this entire time.
    Yes, i saw a behaviourist and she advised me to do the whole 'look and treat' thing. But she never saw Koda react to things and he is responding to Cesars method much better. With the 'look and treat' method, Koda would look at me to get a treat, but he was generally still in an excited or anxious state of mind and if i dropped the leash he would still run off and chase the car, person, chicken, dog or whatever it is that set him off. Whereas when i tested Cesar's method on Koda today. With only a couple of corrections i had Koda laying down at my feet in a calm submissive state of mind while there were cars driving in and out of the drive way, 4 strange people wandering around, tractors going around in paddocks, and chickens clucking very loudly. It was just unbelievable! I think i'll be sticking to this method now, because not only do i feel more confident but Koda seems so much more happy and relaxed. Even after one day i've noticed he seems to be not reacting as much as he normally would before i even do anything.

    I took this photo while there were strangers walking around and tractors going around the place, and he was just so relaxed
    1452260_702252523127525_198849424_n.jpg

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    'maddogdodge' - Good Stuff !

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    Quote Originally Posted by maddogdodge View Post
    I tried out the method of doing the 'chhtt' sound with a quick correction via a tug on the leash or a tap on the neck/shoulder area whenever Koda starts to show signs that he is going to react to something. I am almost in disbelief of how effective this is, and i almost feel like i've been doing this the wrong way for Koda this entire time.
    Yes, i saw a behaviourist and she advised me to do the whole 'look and treat' thing. But she never saw Koda react to things and he is responding to Cesars method much better. With the 'look and treat' method, Koda would look at me to get a treat, but he was generally still in an excited or anxious state of mind and if i dropped the leash he would still run off and chase the car, person, chicken, dog or whatever it is that set him off. 1452260_702252523127525_198849424_n.jpg
    Glad this is working for you.

    With the look and treat the whole point is to always do it below threshold so your timing was very wrong. Also the dog first needs to look at and acknowledge the thing that he finds worrisome (LAT) and then look at you for a treat. I found with my fear aggressive dog I had to get all the elements right with this method and really understand it for it to be effective. It was very time consuming as I could only progress the closer distance at the pace my dog was being reconditioned and was not reacting. It did work well but it took a lot of time and patience.

    I persevered because the method that is working for Koda did not work for this dog.

    However I have a BC who is very motion sensitive and would want to chase other dogs. I did a mix with him. I rewarded him for focussing on me but I also used a leash correction and sharp voice sound if he was about to react and chase and that worked well for him. But he doesnt suffer from the intense fear of the other dog I worked with, and knew well that I didnt like him chasing other dogs and that I was enforcing this rule.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 11-16-2013 at 05:16 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    Glad this is working for you.

    With the look and treat the whole point is to always do it below threshold so your timing was very wrong. Also the dog first needs to look at and acknowledge the thing that he finds worrisome (LAT) and then look at you for a treat. I found with my fear aggressive dog I had to get all the elements right with this method and really understand it for it to be effective. It was very time consuming as I could only progress the closer distance at the pace my dog was being reconditioned and was not reacting. It did work well but it took a lot of time and patience.

    I persevered because the method that is working for Koda did not work for this dog.

    However I have a BC who is very motion sensitive and would want to chase other dogs. I did a mix with him. I rewarded him for focussing on me but I also used a leash correction and sharp voice sound if he was about to react and chase and that worked well for him. But he doesnt suffer from the intense fear of the other dog I worked with, and knew well that I didnt like him chasing other dogs and that I was enforcing this rule.
    The problem with the 'look and treat' method for my situation is the fact that it is impossible for us to keep Koda under his threshold even at home. My dad runs a scrap metal business so he has cars, trucks and tractors coming to our house all the time, and because Koda is not allowed in the house, there is no way i can keep him from being exposed to this. Which is why it was just not working for us. Thankfully the other method is working well so far.

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    Yes it's called the cut the crap method LOL It's not his method he just prefers to use it, it's been around for a veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery long time. It's called correction, redirection and prevention of escalation if you want to be fancy. Basically you're letting the dog know he's on the wrong path, don't do that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    Yes it's called the cut the crap method LOL It's not his method he just prefers to use it, it's been around for a veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery long time. It's called correction, redirection and prevention of escalation if you want to be fancy. Basically you're letting the dog know he's on the wrong path, don't do that.
    Yes I use the cut the crap method quite effectively if required and have done for a very long time and will continue to.

    However I must say that with my genetically fearful dog it really didnt work nearly as well as the desensitisation method. That dog was far from normal though and was on the edge of extreme, pathological fear. She wanted to be obedient but her fears overcame her and correcting her at any level just didnt work, it shut her down to the point where she was non functional. Desensitisation along with obedience training with a clicker which I dont normally use allowed her to become much more functional. However it was not for the faint hearted.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 11-16-2013 at 08:57 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    Yes it's called the cut the crap method LOL It's not his method he just prefers to use it, it's been around for a veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery long time. It's called correction, redirection and prevention of escalation if you want to be fancy. Basically you're letting the dog know he's on the wrong path, don't do that.
    The cut the crap method brilliant!!
    I just called it Cesar's method cause i didn't really know what else to call it I'm very keen to get out in public and test this method, i feel so much more confident using it. I just have to wait for my muzzle to arrive in the mail. I ordered one online but when it arrived it was too small so I have to send it back and they're sending me the next size up.

    From my observations, (despite my original ideas) Koda is generally not fearful of the things he reacts to except for men, but even then i'd only call that nervousness not true fear. Most of his reactivity seems to stem from a mix of excitement, territorial behaviour, a bit of anxiousness and just generally being overwhelmed.
    Last edited by maddogdodge; 11-16-2013 at 09:05 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by maddogdodge View Post
    The cut the crap method brilliant!!
    I just called it Cesar's method cause i didn't really know what else to call it I'm very keen to get out in public and test this method, i feel so much more confident using it. I just have to wait for my muzzle to arrive in the mail. I ordered one online but when it arrived it was too small so I have to send it back and they're sending me the next size up.

    From my observations, (despite my original ideas) Koda is generally not fearful of the things he reacts to except for men, but even then i'd only call that nervousness not true fear. Most of his reactivity seems to stem from a mix of excitement, territorial behaviour, a bit of anxiousness and just generally being overwhelmed.
    Let us know how you go.

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    A dog will be nervous of things it doesnt understand and react according to breed and genetics. Aussies are not teddybears. It's up to the handler to teach the dog, we dont behave like X, we behave like Y and it's worth doing because I will reward you heavily for it. Remember too we try and push dogs straight from negative feelings into wanting them to love things. They cannot stretch that far. You have to start with neutrality, hey don't worry about that man, nothing will happen he's really boring. Once the dog loses the value for the stimulus THEN you can attach another emotion to it to whatever level you want that to be. It's all part of classical conditioning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    Remember too we try and push dogs straight from negative feelings into wanting them to love things. They cannot stretch that far. You have to start with neutrality, hey don't worry about that man, nothing will happen he's really boring. Once the dog loses the value for the stimulus THEN you can attach another emotion to it to whatever level you want that to be. It's all part of classical conditioning.
    Yes it took me a lot of work and time to condition my dog to tolerate things that sent her into a red zone or complete melt down with no ability to act any other way than by raw emotion and instinct.

    It was a step by step process always trying to keep her on neutral territory as I upped the anti. The outcome was reasonably good but she was always a dog that was going to need some degree of management. She is the only dog I have ever owned where there was something deeply flawed in the way she was wired. I cant say I ever want to go through it again but I learnt a whole lot on that particular journey. My current dogs are are walk in the park in comparison LOL and they are all high drive working dogs.

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