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Thread: Cord destroyers

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,602

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    By the way - if you can't shut the door to the electrical cords - maybe some strategically placed vicks vapour rub would make them less attractive. Or crib stop or aloe vera - all taste Yuk to a dog (super bitter). Note - chilli does not work for long - the dog just acquires the taste for it.

    Personally I think a (big) crate is more humane and safe for the dog than tying it up to a tree. My dog's crate kept her safe from a small child that wanted to say hello. And kept all the bugs and ants off too (one of those soft sided ones). Child got to say hello later with adult supervision. And no neck problems from lunging at passing bicycles or teenagers on skate boards.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

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    What an absolute load of shite. Actually I know a few people in Australia that believe the same thing because they don't understand what crate training is.

    Crating taps into the dogs innate denning behavior. Dogs as a species live underground and in small spaces. They dig holes and crawl in to regulate body temperature and whelp their puppies so it's not going against nature. If you FORCE a dog and frighten it with the crate, as I have a couple of clients have done to their dogs, of course you create problems. I know one dog pushed in, then chastised and the crate hit when he whined - well what do you think happened there. If you let the dog go in of their own accord, put their goodies in there and don't let them be harassed in the crate (otherwise they feel trapped and it can increase anxiety) even the most frightened, nervy dog will love a crate.

    People with these opinions should not be training dogs.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    What an absolute load of shite. Actually I know a few people in Australia that believe the same thing because they don't understand what crate training is.

    Crating taps into the dogs innate denning behavior. Dogs as a species live underground and in small spaces. They dig holes and crawl in to regulate body temperature and whelp their puppies so it's not going against nature. If you FORCE a dog and frighten it with the crate, as I have a couple of clients have done to their dogs, of course you create problems. I know one dog pushed in, then chastised and the crate hit when he whined - well what do you think happened there. If you let the dog go in of their own accord, put their goodies in there and don't let them be harassed in the crate (otherwise they feel trapped and it can increase anxiety) even the most frightened, nervy dog will love a crate.

    People with these opinions should not be training dogs.
    I absolutely agree with you nekhbet. Dogs way before we were domesticating them did exactly that! I knew she was a nutter. lol. My friends on the group have msged me on facebook and were like omg this chick is a nutter. I found it all quite entertaining, but she was okay with those larger crates that are made out of tent material... everyone was like well that is a crate to you know...
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
    Posts
    727

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    Before I brought Misha home I went through the house with a granmother's eye I packed away anything that a pup could damage or that could damage her.
    I bought a length of flexible wire mesh, cut it into 40 cm wide strips, and positioned them to protect exposed cords and plugs.
    I stuffed towels in the gaps under the lounge to stop toys disappearing under the lounge so she wouldn't scratch or chew at the lounge to retrieve a lost toy.

    I had a large pen indoors and she spent quite a bit of time in there for the first month or 2, especially when I wasn't home.
    She also had pig's ears and roo jerky to chew on as well as the usual toys.

    Must admit my home looked strange for about 12 months! It was great to put it back to normal after the mad chewing stage was over!
    Last edited by grevillea47; 03-28-2013 at 07:39 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

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    Quote Originally Posted by grevillea47 View Post
    Before I brought Misha home I went through the house with a granmother's eye I packed away anything that a pup could damage or that could damage her.
    I bought a length of flexible wire mesh, cut it into 40 cm wide strips, and positioned them to protect exposed cords and plugs.
    I stuffed towels in the gaps under the lounge to stop toys disappearing under the lounge so she wouldn't scratch or chew at the lounge to retrieve a lost toy.

    I had a large pen indoors and she spent quite a bit of time in there for the first month or 2, especially when I wasn't home.
    She also had pig's ears and roo jerky to chew on as well as the usual toys.

    Must admit my home looked strange for about 12 months! It was great to put it back to normal after the mad chewing stage was over!
    panda hardly ever does it but when she does she makes sure its something i like.
    No one loves you like your dog does.

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