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Thread: Koda's behaviourist appointment

  1. #1
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    Default Koda's behaviourist appointment

    The behaviourist came to see Koda today!
    It went really well, basically she said that we have to focus on all the things that Koda doesn't like (men, dogs, strange noises, skateboards etc) and i have to slowly bring them closer to him over time while i'm asking him to sit and look at me. The result we are hoping for is where something he doesn't like can go right past him and he doesn't even notice, he stays focused on me the whole time. This is all done at home, the next step (hopefully in a couple of weeks) will be to go out on a walk with the behaviourist and hopefully meet some other dogs and practice the learned techniques. I also learned that the breeder who i got him from could have actually planted the seed for his nervousness around some people because of the way she disciplined him as a pup

  2. #2
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    How did the breeder discipline him as a pup?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    How did the breeder discipline him as a pup?
    The breeder had quite a rough look to her with short hair too... so to a dog she would have looked quite manly, and Koda is much more nervous of men than women. The breeder used to pin him to the ground quite forcefully. She told me to do that when i first got him... and i did at first but i didn't really like doing it so i stopped doing that and started focussing on positive reinforcement. I think Koda trains better like that
    Koda is an exceptionally sensitive dog, especially to people who tend to show a more dominant/threatening demeanor.

  4. #4
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    Often it has a lot to do with genetics and selecting good breeding stock with good temperaments is paramount.

    I had a dog once that was terrified of men and I look nothing like a man. She reacted particularly if they had deep voices. She was also reactive around other dogs. I certainly didnt do anything that I am aware of to cause this behaviour as I have had many dogs and never one like her. I did meet her father later on and he was a also a reactive dog. She also needed a lot of hard work and although she learnt to focus on me and had great obedience skills, she was never a dog that I would have trialed with.

    I know plenty of working dogs disciplined fairly harshly and most of them are fine temperament wise. In the old days pinning to the ground was not an uncommon practice and I did it myself with my first dogs many years ago and they had brilliant temperaments and were very reliable in public. I dont do it these days as I have learnt better methods.

    Good luck with Koda, and good on you for making the effort.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-17-2013 at 12:33 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    Often it has a lot to do with genetics and selecting good breeding stock with good temperaments is paramount.

    I had a dog once that was terrified of men and I look nothing like a man. She reacted particularly if they had deep voices. She was also reactive around other dogs. I certainly didnt do anything that I am aware of to cause this behaviour as I have had many dogs and never one like her. I did meet her father later on and he was a also a reactive dog. She also needed a lot of hard work and although she learnt to focus on me and had great obedience skills, she was never a dog that I would have trialed with.

    I know plenty of working dogs disciplined fairly harshly and most of them are fine temperament wise. In the old days pinning to the ground was not an uncommon practice and I did it myself with my first dogs many years ago and they had brilliant temperaments and were very reliable in public. I dont do it these days as I have learnt better methods.

    Good luck with Koda, and good on you for making the effort.
    I know very little of Koda's genetics, this was discussed during the consultation. I have only met his mother who was very happy and welcoming!
    Whatever it is that has caused the problem, i am sure that with the behaviourists guidance i can get on top of it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddogdodge View Post
    I know very little of Koda's genetics, this was discussed during the consultation. I have only met his mother who was very happy and welcoming!
    Whatever it is that has caused the problem, i am sure that with the behaviourists guidance i can get on top of it.
    Yes with my fear aggressive dog I met the mother who was lovely. It wasnt untill I met the father later on when I was having problems that I saw that he was the same. The breeder did take him out of her program.

    I found my behaviourist very helpful too. I worked really hard and my dog was certainly very manageable in public but because of her genetics I had to learn to recognise when she had had enough of a situation and manage her accordingly. The strength of her training usually held even in unforseen circunmstances, but I still learnt to recognise those subtle signs. My behaviourist really taught me to recognise them.

  7. #7

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    'maddogdodge' - really really really pleased that the visit from your behaviourist yesterday was a success for both you and Koda!

    Win – Win – love it ! The only way it should be !

    As to what you behaviourist suggested - I can see how a breeder’s interaction/discipline with Koda would have had some impact/bearing on his subsequent behaviour – but - there is really a lot of other things that can affect it. As ‘Kalacreek’ said - temperament and genetics of the parents of Koda are also vitally important when looking at what your pup will/could turn out like in the future. Then there is another really important aspect – which is environment ! They all play a part in differing degrees to the overall make-up of your pup as he gets older !

    Have a look at the following link – particularly the fear periods:

    http://www.dogforum.com.au/puppy-dis...-calendar.html

    With my GSP girls – never really had any hassles with them during all the different stages – but as they were b$tches to start off with – nothing really changed !

    The boys – well – the 2nd fear period – 8 – 16 months and of course the ‘Selective deafness? (5-9 Months)’ – really had me on my toes ! So basically from about 6 – 18 months – we did heaps of training and socialisation - both formal and casual - this was the only way for me to solve things in that time frame !

    Sound and situation desensitising – well you can get heaps off the Internet – as you would know - and as others have said – find places where there are heaps of different noises – footy matches, industrial areas, pick up times at schools – heaps of choices – initially- just in the car and then out and about. As your behaviourist has suggested – LAT is excellent for these types of situations. I extend LAT to not only look at that –which I point to - but also LAM – look at me !

    Fear of males – well, when Riley first arrived – he wanted to kill all males – didn't discriminate – just hated them all ! So, initially with the help of a couple of dog savvy male friends I taught him – ‘friend’ – as ‘go to friend’. Once he was happy with that – I extended the males in his life – so he could get a good variety ! So now – the guys that drive the garbage trucks, the postie, the parcel delivery bloke, the Energex guys plus heaps of others – he trusts me now that they are all OK.

    There have been a few times that Riley has been uncomfortable with this meet and greet stuff – so I haven’t pushed things. These few times, he has shown superior and correct knowledge – which I was very grateful for ! Working as a team is what is important – trusting each other – is where I really like to be with my pups ! If they don’t like someone – I take notice - there usually is always a really good reason why !

    The point of my long post – is to show you that you are not alone or the only one that has ever had to deal with problems with the pups that we take into our lives and love dearly – it happens to all of us at some stage - particularly with us that care !

    So – do your homework – as set by your behaviourist – and I wish you heaps of great success !

  8. #8
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    Glad it went well MDD, looking forward to more progress reports (and photos ) ...

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