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Thread: Bedtime..HELP

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Melbourne
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    5

    Default Bedtime..HELP

    So tonight is my first night with our new pup a 6 month old Koolie X Kelpie called Jack.. and we don't know what to do...
    We had his bed out earlier in the living room and he had a few naps on that and understands that this is his space, but we want him to sleep in the laundry at night ( the same room that we feed him in and his water is located ) how do we do it?!?!?!

    I moved the bed into the laundry a about an hour ago and he knows that it is there as i've shown it to him and we had a little play on it.
    I've now taken him in there, told him goodnight, given him a small treat, turned the light off and shut the door.

    After the initial scratch at the door and a little one off bark I promptly went over to the door and told him NO.

    it's gone a little quiet... hang on, as i've typed this he's done a couple of scratches again which i've so far ignored..
    Am I doing this right??

    HELP

  2. #2

    Default

    Well he's not howling so he's obviously not distraught at being left in the laundry. Just ignore the scratching and he'll get the message that it's bedtime.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    SE QLD
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    A puppy won't understand what "no" means. If that is where you want to sleep you need to put him in there, close the door and leave him until it is time for a toilet break etc. When he howls or scratches and you come to him, you are rewarding him for behaviour you do not want. In his mind he thinks scratching = my humans pay me attention, horay for me!

    Best thing to do is ignore him, he will learn that crying doesn't give him attention. Its hard to do when they are whining because its so annoying. But its best for them.

    Have you considered crate training him at all? It's not something I would do but it can be good for the dog, a lot of members here do and highly recommend it.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
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    Why the laundry?
    Do you worry that he will pee on the floor?
    He will not want to pee in the room he sleeps in.
    I cant quite remember the 6 month mark but I used
    to take Snoopy out to pee at 9.00 pm and he could
    make it until morning (erm..5.30-6am).
    From the first night we called it "poopy time" as it
    helps a lot if pup understands what is expected of him.

    Make his bed somewhere he can at least see you - we just
    had our pup on the floor (on folded sheepskin rugs)
    beside our bed. ( a corner or back to the wall )
    He was happy, he felt safe and he never, ever cried at night.
    He also did not pee in the bedroom, but would sometimes go
    out to the hearth/fireplace in the lounge and do it there.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    I used a baby gate in our bedroom doorway, so my pup couldn't sneak off to go wee or poo in another room. And she did never wee or poo in my bedroom once. She would actually make an effort to wake me up if she needed to go.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    near Sydney NSW
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    I wish I'd crate trained Misha when I first got her!
    If I remember correctly, at 6 months she was sleeping through the night without a toilet break. At that age she was still sleeping in her puppy pen, indoors.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Do you always want your puppy to sleep in the laundry?

    What JadieLee87 says - if you go to the door and give him attention - he's going to do what ever it was - more.

    I really don't like to scold my dog for doing dog things. I'm trying to eradicate "No" and "Bad Dog" from my vocab, and you can find yourself disqualified from some dog competitions for using "verbal reprimands".

    So imagine you went to visit a family where you didn't speak their language. And they showed you into a very boring cold room (the laundry). And you could hear them having fun (or a life) outside the room you were in. You couldn't open the door - so you knocked on it. And someone came and yelled at you, shut the door and walked away.

    How would you feel about these people?

    What if - every five minutes they came in and gave you a fun toy, or some yummy food and checked you were ok, and every hour or so - took you out into the garden... and played some simple games with you like catch...

    Or even better, they let you hang around with them - even though you had no clue what they were talking about.

    Then how would you feel about them?

    Dogs are not humans - but they don't like being scolded when they had no idea they did anything wrong or what you want any more than you would. This is a new puppy. Understand that he has no clue what you want. You have to show him and reward him for what you want - like sitting quietly on the mat in the laundry. Go into the laundry and reward him before he gets upset or bored and wants out.


    MannersMinder/Treat & Train Research | Research | About Sophia | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS
    specifically
    6.Are verbal reprimands such as “ah” or “no” okay?

    A: At first I thought the verbal reprimand for dogs who broke their down-stay on the rug might work, but the dogs I used it on became confused or scared. If I reprimanded them when they got up from their down-stay and pointed for them to go back to their rug, they tended to get up again and submissively crawl over to me or just get up and freeze in place because they didn’t know what to do. It became clear that they didn’t really know what I wanted and that’s why they were getting up. The protocol needed to be adjusted so they were getting more frequent positive reinforcement for staying in the down-stay, rather than a reprimand for messing up.
    These links might help too. It doesn't matter how old your new puppy dog is - the same methods apply.
    http://www.dogstardaily.com/training...swers-top-faqs
    Q 15 applies specifically.

    http://www.dogstardaily.com/training...-housetraining

    All things dog training
    http://www.dogstardaily.com/training...ining-textbook
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 11-04-2012 at 04:14 PM.

  8. #8
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    As pups both Bella & Harley (Even Molly when she was a kitten) were all close to me and my OH when we were asleep whether that was in our room/ensuite until they were both comfortable in their new home and older. I think it is much more comforting for them when they have had such a drastic change.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Thanks guys!! So much info to take in, he settled properly in the laundry after around 10 minutes.. The reason he is in there is so he doesn't have the run of the house when we aren't awake to supervise. We are in a rental property and although we have gone through the proper channels to have him here we don't want to give him the chance to damage anything.
    He has a big squishy bed/pillow plus a couple of blankets and a teddy and rope.. Plus like I say this is where we feed him and where is water is. We also put him to bed when we go to bed so there shouldn't be anything going on outside the door. We will see how this works for us.
    I don't really fancy a crate as we got him from a rescue and i'm not sure how he will feel about this.

    I opened the door to him this morning as he was so so excited to see us, we went outside had a play and then got his breakfast ready.. He's been so amazing today even though we had a few hiccups (not his fault) I just love him so much !

  10. #10
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    The rescue you got him from advocates the use of crates. As long as the crate is paired with fun yummy things like treats and games and not punishment and solitary confinement - dogs are quite happy. My dog will run to her crate - especially if she is somewhere relatively unfamilar - ie not home. She's quite happy to go in the crate at home too - I don't shut the door all that often, and that's where the bob a lot is.

    And if you think they don't like small enclosed spaces - they're like kids and cubbies. Two of her other fave places are under the rainwater tank - and she has to crawl, and behind the sofa.

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