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Thread: How to stop your dog from barking at children

  1. #11
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    iv been having same problem with my puppy too, i have been saying NO in loud growly voice & then make her sit by me till shes settled & then she can resume playing with the little ones, its only just sinking in lol, but we atill have our days i presuming eventually she will stop it all together, patience is the key

  2. #12

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    ' ava,s mummy' - you don't need a loud voice with your pup. Pups have excellent hearing and it is soooo much better than ours.

    Years ago trainers that I came across used to always say that my voice was not loud enough or low enough ! Thank heavens times have changed.

    I use just a normal speaking voice to start off with training my pups. As time goes on - the pitch of my voice gets softer.

    Sometimes a loud voice will excite your pup or they completely switch off and don't listen to you at all - and that is definitely not what you want !

    Try it and see what sort of reaction you get from your pup !

    As with all training - both of you have to enjoy it - if not - have a break and try again later !

  3. #13
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    when i say loud voice i dont mean screaming at her just short sharp growly no, i talk to her in normal voice except when i really dont want her doing something like jumping or biting, she seems to know by my tone im displeased, but as with all puppies rewards it takes time & patience, i do take breaks i dont train her rigidly i like to make our training fun

  4. #14
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    short sharp growly no
    This is known as a "verbal reprimand" and with some trainers and dog sports - using verbal reprimands is banned. There are other ways.

    Tho I do feel a bit sorry for the "chicken lady" at the beach when Frosty is jumping and barking at her in the hopes of getting chicken RIGHT NOW and the chicken lady (and I) do all the wrong things by way of correction. Frosty has no idea what she wants when she points her finger and says "NO!". I tell the chicken lady to tell her to sit. But I'm thinking maybe grabbing and holding the collar so I can catch and remove evil hound to a safe (less overwhelmed) distance might be a better option. Frosty treats the chicken lady exactly how the chicken lady trained her. Oops. Oops is a "non reward marker" ie get no treat for that behaivour. so is "try again", and "try something else". So very similar to a verbal reprimand and gets almost the same reaction of barking frustration from my dog. She's willing to do a bunch of cool stuff for what she wants, but not if she's always gotten chicken for free (or even for being naughty).

  5. #15
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    i have been trying hand signs as well as verbal commands, and seeing that my puppy will never be in trials or showing i dont see why my verbal no followed by a shake of my head for no wont work? it seems to be working. I read an article about deaf dogs being trained by body language & hand signs & thought i might try them together. I just want a well behaved dog.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ava,s mummy View Post
    i have been trying hand signs as well as verbal commands, and seeing that my puppy will never be in trials or showing i dont see why my verbal no followed by a shake of my head for no wont work? it seems to be working.
    As long as it communicates disapproval and the puppy understands what it means and why you're doing it, there's nothing wrong with a verbal reprimand.

  7. #17
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    I have a jumpy dog and it took me quite a while to realise that my telling her off and trying to grab her by the collar was perceived by her as me joining in with the excitement.

    I don't think it's necessary to add a disapproving noise in this situation. All you need so show her is that she cannot get do what she wants if she cannot do it in a calm way. And it is usually more effective to give rewards for what you want them to do - stay calm around the kids in this case - than to try teach them what not to do.

    We often forget to reward our dogs for those kind of behaviours. I try to make an effort to give my dog positive attention when she is lying down quietly too. In your case, it is possible that you are unknowingly teaching your pup that she can get your attention by jumping up on kids, because to her any attention from the pack leader is better than no attention.

  8. #18
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    ava's mummy

    a verbal reprimand - well timed can work. But it can also fail if it's not quite timed or the dog doesn't understand what it's being reprimanded for. As with my example with the chicken lady - my dog has no idea what she's doing wrong or what she should be doing instead. Grabbing her collar and holding her still - is a good behaviour - incompatible with the jumping up. That might be a good start for me and the chicken lady.

    A verbal reprimand isn't likely to work if the dog is over the threshold of being able to learn. At this point - you want a conditioned command eg come, or drop - that the dog has just learned automatically without thinking about - like the way Pavlov's dogs salivate when they hear the bell (or see the yoghurt pot).

    And other possible ways a verbal reprimand can go wrong -

    your dog thinks you're barking too - so she barks more (this is mostly what happens with my dog).
    your dog blames what she's barking at for your disapproval / impending punishment - and will try to make the focus of her attention - leave ie attack can come from this misunderstanding by your dog of what you want.

    verbal reprimands work best when the dog understands there will be some sort of consequence if they persist doing what they're doing. So when I use, it goes something like
    "Frosty - Leave it" which means don't greet that dog phobic person, run to mummy for best ever yummy treat.
    but if she doesn't - I may follow up with
    "What! do you think you're doing?" - which means I'm going to come and get her and stop her from doing what she's doing.

    But for us - this only works up to about level 8 distractions/food/people. The level 10 ones - I have to hope like hell I spot them before she does and get her on lead. Being somewhat taller than her - I'm usually successful. But unfortunately for her training - not always successful.

  9. #19
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    iv been teaching my pup hand & body signals with each command i have for her, so i shake my head no when i say no. when she jumps up on kids & ppl i shake my head no & tell her the word off, & the treat. Were getting there, but as i say to all my friends its like dealing with a 2 yr old child. lol. in time they learn their manners just like puppies do if trained correctly. good luck, sounds to me like your on the right track

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