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Thread: Don't blame the dog - ABC iview TV

  1. #11
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    Did anyone watch this last night?

    Again set in Oz at the Lost Dogs Home, Melbourne.
    I cried like a big baby, so many beautiful pure bred dogs in there.

    Was most impressed with the rapper guy as he began to understand the
    tragic consequences of irresponsible breeding.

  2. #12
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    Didn't watch it yet, will tonight. I finally watched the sheepdog one last night. That cat scene was harrowing! And imo an example of how lots of people have lost the ability to do the most basic problem solving. But that guy was just an all-round idiot anyway. I really enjoyed watching the dogs work. And totally fell in love with Gipsy the kelpie from the first frame she was in.

  3. #13
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    Yes, the Kelpies were a joy to watch, (except for the cat incident, as you said).

  4. #14
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    Just by chance i caught last nights episode.....what a great show !!

    At the start i wanted to knock the wanker wannabe rapper out cold....by the end i think i could be his mate. I must admit to getting the sniffles when he said goodbye to his mate that he was trying to rehome (I think his name was tank...big crossbreed thing).....bloody broke my heart watching him leave that dog.

    Cant wait to see next weeks episode. It taught me alot about humans...especially the ladies who work so dam hard at the shelters. They are champions i reckon.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  5. #15
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    The army dogs are up.

    Extremely cute Malinois and a Belgian Shepherd and maybe GSD (not sure what the killer dog was exactly)

    Same link as first post to get the latest episode.

    Interesting that the lady who let her Mastiff x bite people in the face - wasn't willing to take a bite on the bite suit from the big dog.

  6. #16
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    They mentioned a Dutch shepherd.

    I must say that I found it hard to watch some of those exercises. And it did annoy me that all they talked about was tone of voice and not once mentioned training methods. I know these people mostly need work on their attitude but it's risky to make people believe that all it takes to get a dog to do what you want is to say it with authority.

  7. #17
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    They did say that the training methods are secret and thus cannot be filmed. I have a similar dog training facility near us. Its very private, and screened so you cant see a bloody thing!

    But i thought i saw some shutzhund training evident in dogs. One of the handlers used a few commands from that to his dog. And the attack dog. What a beastie! magnificent dog. Goodness knows what breed this was?
    there is a schutzhund club that tracks/trains near me. They also abseil down craters/cliffs with their dogs on exercises. The dogs are loving working and you should hear the racket at they arrive in utes, that is the sound of excited dogs, who know that they are about to do what they are driven to.
    I joined this club, and heard the same patter about tone of voice. But for me, i did need to change the tone of my voice. I had to be taught NOT to use manners when addressing a dog lol I was the sort of person who said lay down please. And i felt rude/cruel/a bitch when learning to just say DROP!
    Im loving this series. The dog going under water, i loved it.

  8. #18
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    Yeah I got that, about their training methods being secret. But they could've at least mentioned that it is important to teach a dog what your cues mean because they are not born with a comprehensive understanding of the English language. Because most of these people seem surprised that their spoilt dogs don't just do what they ask and seem to think it is merely because they are stubborn or just being jerks.

    So they must be giving these people instructions on how to train off camera to achieve the kind of change they show in the 'after' footage. I just would've liked it to be done on camera...

    And I wasn't saying that the dogs weren't enjoying the exercises. I assume dogs trained to that level live for that kind of stuff. But I still found it hard to watch the abseiling and the balancing exercises. The water exercise was very cool. Especially as it was very easy to imagine them doing that in a war situation.

  9. #19
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    I guess in the field - the dogs and humans would be shot at - so the both would have to be able to cope if some of the exercises were done in a hurry, and a rough manner and somewhat unco (eg if someone was injured).

    I did notice that while it did seem very aversive there were a lot of "good jobs" and ear rubs for the dogs.

    I'm amazed in the herding dog one, and this war dogs one - that the dogs will work with anyone else. My dog generally won't. She will if they've got food and they practice. But not otherwise.

    I didn't like the prong collars in the hands of unco newbies - and noticed that the teacher put her mastiff x in a prong collar for walks. But they do give very good control over a dog with a limited "pinch" rather than an unlimited choke. So while I don't think I could ever use one, I think they have their place - as long as the handler has been trained and knows that it's all in the release.

    I thought the dogs loved it. I also thought they could have stopped the big dog from biting the teacher's face...but they didn't tell her that.

    I think the voice thing is interesting. I equate it to like when you're playing a team sport - you have to be really clear about what you need your team mates to do. So I usually issue "requests" in very imperative commanding tones - ie Fred - three steps left. Other Left! Good. I make sure if they don't want to do that - they should just wave at me so I know they heard me. But after the ball flies past them on the left where I asked them to be - they usually listen. Sometimes they're too tired to move and I just have to live with that - team is in serious trouble when that happens no point getting upset its only a game. But if I said something like "Fred, if you would be so kind and it's not inconveniencing you in any way - and you think it's a good idea too, could you please move three steps to your left... the ball is gone already".

    With the dog - I don't have to be loud. But I do have to be clear. And hand signals get a much better response than vocal anyway. Maybe cos I mumble. But it's funny when my hand signals get mumbled eg spinning finger in the vertical plane means roll over. And we usually start from a drop - so it's context specific. But if I do spinny finger in the horizontal plane - it means move your butt around to the right, and if I keep doing it - turn circles like chasing tail. But there is a variation on that which means "finish" ie go round behind me to the left side. And sometimes I get not what I wanted - ie that hand is doing too many similar signals.

    I tell you what tho - if our dog obedience comps looked like this - I'd be a lot keener. I can't work out what her signals are at all most of the time.
    WK FMBB 2010 - Mia Skogster - Obedience - Grand Finale - YouTube

    She was in Australia recently. I think she does sometimes use verbal reprimands along the lines of "oi! - stop that" - where as Susan Garrett avoids specific reprimands and even non reward markers as much as possible. I'm not 100 % sure about that because I didn't go to the Mia seminar.

    We used to have a bull terrier x who had learned to shut the door on command and we could put the command into an ordinary sounding sentence and he'd do it. Frosty - not so good at that.

  10. #20
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    "I'm amazed in the herding dog one, and this war dogs one - that the dogs will work with anyone else. My dog generally won't. She will if they've got food and they practice. But not otherwise."

    My daughter hasn't kept up practicing with Banjo, so now when she says "Banjo, come", Banjo will come straight to me. Very funny!

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