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Thread: OMG my dog just bit another dog, it's all ok but I have to fix this!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Canberra, ACT
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    Default OMG my dog just bit another dog, it's all ok but I have to fix this!

    Hi everyone, i'm new, I have a gorgeous Husky that has never put a foot wrong. This is the first time I have needed to seek advice like this, so here I am!

    I moved to a small property and my Husky seems so happy with a acre to run and play, but lately he has been bareing his teeth at the neighbours dogs after about 30 minutes of them non stop barking at him through a chicken wire fence, it's like it gets to a point where he gets really gets cranky with them. He has also started to make a weird barking noise back at them and he certainly doesn't like them.

    I let him say hello to a neighbours begle on our daily walk to and he bit her! He grabbed her cheek in his teeth, just for a second because I yanked on his haltie and he let go. I don't think the owner noticed but I did! I understand the nose to nose introduction of 2 dogs is usually a big no no. But it's notmally not a problem. I'm very upset this happened. What do I do to make sure this never happens again?

    He is an only dog and he has a tendency to be dominant sometimes, so some dogs are just aren't suitable play dates, but he has never actually bit them before.

    Bit worried.

    Welcome any advice. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    Sounds like fear aggression with the info you've given.

    See it from his point of view - he's got neighbours that are aggressive towards him and it's causing him stress. In his mind, they might invade his territory and attack him at any time. He doesn't know how long that chicken wire is going to keep them at bay. He now always has to be ready to defend his home to the death and he cannot relax and let his guard down. It looks like it's souring his attitude towards all dogs, since the majority of his dog to dog interaction is unpleasant and stressful.

    Might be a good idea to either tell your neighbour to control their dogs, or find some way for them all to meet and get used to each other in a neutral zone, possibly by organizing a daily walk with your neighbour. In the neutral zone don't allow them to sniff or meet face to face, first just walk together so they can get used to each other's presence while their mind is occupied with walking. If they've spent time together as a pack, the territorial behavior might stop.

    Good luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Bundaberg QLD
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    I've just introduced a new dog to our family and the first day consisted of losta 3 second meet and greets. Slow process but it seemed to work well.
    The dogs will pick up on your feelings so try and be as relaxed as possible but hold that leash tight.

    Good luck with it.


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    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    hope your neighbours are more accommodating of a cure than mine is.
    Should these dogs get through the chicken wire, your dog will win. And it will be messy. So worth imploring your neighbour to mutually work on the mutual solution required.

  5. #5
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    Sep 2012
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    Canberra, ACT
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    Thanks for all the advice. We have just looked up heaps of info on fear aggression and we will do some training with that. Hoping the neighbours will help us out here. The neighbours dogs are very small fuffy things that are a breeding pair, I don't think the thought of dog training has ever crossed their mind. My poor dog has put up with 2 Jack Russels literally attacking him and hanging off his neck before, they thought they were going in for the kill but didn't even penetrate his mass of fur! He would look at us with a sad face and whine as if to say "Make them stop please". But these days he seems to take it into his own hands and is not tolerant of anything any more. I just wish other people would keep their dogs under control. They run straight for him. Aparently other dogs are attracted by his markings, they look a bit like big eyes staring, when he probably isn't even looking. Poor thing, he gets a lot of unwanted attention.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Huskies do seem to attract a lot of unwanted attention from other dogs. Their whole stance is pretty fearsome - they're so upright, fierce and bossy looking to another dog - especially a small one.

    You probably want to put something more secure along the chicken wire - ideally something the bark-a-lots cannot see through.

    lately he has been bareing his teeth at the neighbours dogs after about 30 minutes of them non stop barking at him through a chicken wire fence, it's like it gets to a point where he gets really gets cranky with them. He has also started to make a weird barking noise back at them and he certainly doesn't like them
    If I saw any of this from my dog - she would be put inside immediately. I would not scold her - but I would stop her from getting started. And I would keep her away from the bark-alots' fence.

    I would also be keeping a log of barkalots' barking - how long and when and why (best guess). Not sure how rural you are but obviosuly it's not rural enough and if it's really urban like Qbn - then I would ask the neighbours to stop their dogs from barking - eg go get them each time they start up - and put them inside.

    It's really important - that neither of you scold the dogs for barking - because that just sounds like joining in. And also really important that you don't punish your dog for showing signs of stress. Learn what they are and protect your dog by allowing him to keep his distance from the irritating dog. It's really up to you to step between your dog and the charging/rude dog and protect your dog from them, so your dog does not have to protect himself and you (with rather nasty consequences for both of you). You stand in front and kick the charging dog in the teeth if it doesn't back off when you yell at it best deep growly voice "You BAD DOG - GO HOME" - tho if you have treats - chucking a handful in the other dogs face and then quitely escaping while the other dog is busy can be a more peaceful way of solving it.

    You've given no indication of why your dog went for the beagle or how much time your dog has spent with other dogs he's only just met. And how old is your dog? My dog was the uber grovel dog everywhere until she was about 2 years old - and now she has become quite protective of me - especially if I'm sitting down and someone /thing taller than me approaches from behind, or just at home - door to door sales people - refuse to leave at your peril (shall I let the angry dog go now?).

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the great advice Hyacinth. I have been trying to comfort him to keep him calm and ignore these neighbours dogs barks and growls, he sits with me for a little while and I give him treats for his attention, but I can see him fighting to ignore them and eventually he can't help himself and he runs to the fence line with his teeth out. I'm going to keep his lead in my pocket at all times now and i'll do what you said and bring him inside as soon as this happens from now on. He will scratch at the door desperate to get out while those dogs are going off though, poor thing.

    Yesterday on our walk we had 4 dogs on 3 different incidences run straight at him while he was on lead, he was ready to eat them! He didn't do anything but there was a lot of growling, one incident was 2 very large (same size as him) friendly puppies (about 1 yo's) jumping all over him, he wasn't happy. The other 2 incidents were not friendly dogs, they are serial wanderers, they crouch down with tail under and teeth out and stalk a meter or 2 behind us, really stresses Cruize out, he would turn and growl about ever 30 seconds. I'd tell him to leave it and we'd walk on but he can't ignore them for long.

    I just don't know what to do. My husband is going to walk with us now so he can control the approaching dogs and I can get Cruize to sit, leave it, etc etc. To try and reduce some anxiety.

    As a puppy he was well socialised, we went to puppy training and then we continued with agility club for a while. He has always been hand to handle around other dogs on a lead, but off lead he usually checks them out and then goes about ingoing them. I take him on regular play dates, he has select dogs he will run and play with but most of my friends dogs he ignores. He is an explorer and much prefers to be on his own sniffing around the park or a friends yard then playing with the dogs, he loves new places and loves people. I do think he may be an alpha male since he has no interest in playing. He has never tolerated dogs jumping on his back, but he has never bared teeth or even looked like biting until now. He is 7 years old.

    Any more idea's and advice is well appreciated. I loove training him so i'll try everything, just for fun.

  8. #8
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    Sep 2012
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    Oh man,
    I just did some research on the net (as we do) and I think i'm dealing with 2 different issues here.

    This article How To Handle Fear and Fear Aggression in Dogs | The Balanced Canine has some really good pictures.

    These pictures display the 2 different aggressive stances my dog is displaying. At the fence line when other dogs are trying to fight him through the chicken wire he has a defensive fear aggression stance. With hackles up, teeth bared and he is really low to the ground with neck forward.

    When we are out on walks and there is another dog running straight at him, it doesn't matter if the dog wants to play with him or attack him, my dog has a dominance aggression stance. His tail up up, ears are up, hackles up, no teeth are out but he he is stiff legged and stressed. He only growls out on a walk once the dog jumps on him.

    Oh man, I have my work cut out for me. I'm considering enrolling him in a training course where we can go once a week and work on obedience and stuff in an environment with other dogs around. But he know his obedience so well, all he really needs is the socialisation and experience being around other dogs in a positive environment. Well that's my guess.

  9. #9
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    Apr 2012
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    near Sydney NSW
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    You mentioned that you moved house, did you mean recently and if so, was he displaying these traits when walked at your previous home?

  10. #10
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    He has always been a bit hard to handle around other dogs, he always desperately wants to check them out. But nothing would ever happen when he went up to another dog. Since we moved house and he is getting harassed through the fence on a a daily basis, he seems to be more aggressive toward other dogs now. I still take him on his play dates and he is always fine with the dogs he knows and hangs out with regularly, just new dogs and usually only when he is on a lead.

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