Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Would do you think of this technique?

  1. #11

    Default

    Yes, this would work - the dog learns to associate jumping up with having its paws held, which it doesn't like. However it's much quicker and easier just to say "down" and push the dog away whenever it jumps.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    As always it's horses for courses.

    With some dogs I've met this wouldn't deter them much.

    Others it's likely to make them fearful.

    So as long as it's on the right type of dog I've got no problem with it.

    When I got the Gordon, I knew of course she was going to be a big heavy dog with a lot of fur on her feet, so set very firm ground rules that she was never to be picked up or encouraged up. If you wanted to cuddle her you sat on the ground or her dog bed next to her. Because the last thing I wanted was large dirty feet (particularly with all that fur) jumping on me or knocking over a less sturdy person or child.

    As a result she never jumps in her greetings, though she is vocal and does like to nudge you with her muzle.

    My ex-husband encouraged all the Kelpies to jump, which I hated, but then he rarely wore good clothes, and he would catch them in his arms. On the other hand I'd come home from work and would either have to change clothes or be standing there going "no jump", trying to catch them in my arms always resulted in long scratches.

    The Whippets are a lot lighter in everything they do, don't have big dirty paws so I've relaxed the rules for them and just an Ah is enough to stop them jumping.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Yeah not a fan of that at all.... What if you want to teach your dog to jump up as a trick?
    Meet Luna, a 13 month old Beagle pup in Melbourne with her sister Cynder a 13 week old Border Collie!
    Check out their blog at http://lunadogslife.blogspot.com

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    They taught this at our local puppy school but it only worked the first time on Snoopy.
    The same with the cheek pinching etc and throwing your dog down to a drop.
    At some point I thought - "enough" he was becoming jumpy, bitey and I honestly felt no love for
    this puppy and was getting none in return.
    So I said to the dog -"I'm not hurting you anymore".
    After trying a trainer who helped a bit and getting advice from this forum I got results from
    the ignore, walk away, end play and he stopped the jumping.
    The mouthing ended thanks to a ball knotted in a wooly sock. That became the chase toy
    (and still is). When he wants to play he gets his sock toy and prances around, so I chase him
    and then we play hide and seek, fetch etc.
    Once he would come and mouth/bite my hand when he wanted a game.

    It may help to bob down to the puppy (once he sits) and then have cuddles and praise.
    Our dog grew so quickly that picking him up was not an option by the 6 month mark.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    it's not my prefered technique for teaching no jumping. And my main problem is with strangers that do things to encourage jumping. If I have a problem with that, I put her on lead before she can go greet these people. Mostly she doesn't.

    But it is a very similar technique to the one I use to discourage biting eg I push my hand into my dog's mouth until she tries to spit me out, hold a second and let her spit me out. It is aversive because I am making my dog uncomfortable, but the reward comes (play/pats/praise) as soon as she spits me out.

    Another trainer I know - just freezes for a while if she gets chomped. Ie suddenly becomes no fun at all. Which is also something the dog doesn't like but it's slighty more gentle on the scale of aversives than my technique but also more painful for the handler.

    Jumping - I turn my back and freeze and be boring for a while. If it's someone else - I put her on lead and only allow her to greet if she's calm enough to keep all her paws on the ground.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    I must admit I never turn my back on a large dog when they jump, newfies would flatten you.......I actually walk into the dog (firm and determined) and just do not make any eye contact or say anything. Seems to work. I think jumping is more of an environment issue and often a leadership issue too. All to be dealt with seperately...... I do like to control my Jumpers when they are new by having them on lead when there are other people around. you cannot expect non handler/owners to deal with jumpers. The owner/handler should be the one to control the jumper. And of course high reward for the right thing, sit/stand/drop on greeting
    Pets are forever

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Agree Newfie. I think people are so reluctant to use a lead to block, control, steer etc; such a useful pce of equipment.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
    Posts
    607

    Default

    My main issue with his technique is that he commands the dog up and then punishes it by holding it's paws. While the dog may learn that jumpin creates a negative, it is also learning that doing what the handler says creates a negative, while disobeying a command gets him pats and praise... Quite silly, really.

    I think teaching the dog "up" and "down/drop" works if it is consistent and taught without distraction first as you want it to be proofed without over-excitement.

    The no touch, no talk, no eye contact works if they're not large and don't have painful claws that scratch your legs.

    I've also used correction chains and spray bottles, which also work for those that require a positive punishment, as opposed to a negative punishment (ignoring, time out, etc) but its really about what works best for each dog.

    You could probably use the technique if you didn't encourage the dog up first, but as I said it's what is best for each dog.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    I would hazard a guess that the command for up then punish was just for this demonstration. Not really something to base the technique on at all.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
    Posts
    607

    Default

    It is beleved that saying down and pushing them down actually just involves you in their game, which is what they want.

    Verbal tends to excite them more. Sound = excitement, quiet = calm

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •