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Thread: When Becoming a Foster Carer for Dogs

  1. #1

    Default When Becoming a Foster Carer for Dogs

    Hi all!
    In the near future I plan to get a large property.... acres.

    When this happens I would like to become a foster carer for Australian Cattle Dogs.
    I understand it will be allot of work and committment etc... but its what I want to do! I didn't want to breed them but I wanted to do something that would help the unfortunate dogs, I hate the thought of them getting put down So I would like to do everything I can to help

    I was just wanting to know is there a standard in which my property will have to be at?
    Also what will I need to make the dogs comfortable until they are adopted? I have my own cattle dog... would this be an issue?
    Would I have to undertake any formal training?

    Is anyone else a fosterer? (i think I spelt that right)
    Do you have any suggestions?
    Do you have photo's of your kennel set up?
    Sit, drop & roll!!! So proud of my little man

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    Hi Anklebiter.

    I am unsrue of the exact requirements for cattle dogs. I rescued Pugs for several years and so my ideas of what a foster carer is like and needs will be different as I would assume that ACDs may not have restrictions such as being inside only dogs.

    However, you will more than likely require sturdy fencing. The dogs will need to be able to be safe and secure whilst in your care. You may need a quarantine area, this will depend on the rescue you foster for. You will also need an area that a dog that is ill or convalescing can be kept.

    Your own dog will not neccessarily be an issue, but please keep in mind that if the dog you are fostering has not gone through quarantine you may be putting your dog at risk of serious illness.

    If you were fostering for me, you would be expected to teach the dog basics such as walking in lead, toilet training and basic manners such as sitting for dinner. Each rescue will be slightly different though.

    You will not most likely be required to undertake any formal training.

    There is a very good book that has just been released that I highly recommend you purchase and have a read through it. It will explain everything to you. Please also ask lots of and lots of questions of the rescue org that you decide to foster for.

    Canine Foster Carer Manual

    Please keep in mind that tis book is largely written for NSW carers though and so you will need to check out the local laws, by-laws and regulations applicable to you in Vic.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  3. #3

    Default

    Great post Anne.

    Australian working dog rescue, Australian Working Dog Rescue
    Have some really helpful information re fostering. Check out their foster application forms to get an idea of exactly what they look for in a foster carer.

    Hard work at times but incredibly rewarding.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JJames View Post
    Great post Anne.

    Australian working dog rescue, Australian Working Dog Rescue
    Have some really helpful information re fostering. Check out their foster application forms to get an idea of exactly what they look for in a foster carer.

    Hard work at times but incredibly rewarding.
    Thanks JJames.
    That website was a big help.

    One thing that concerns me is if I had to take them to the vet... as they can be quite expensive depending on whats required.
    Sit, drop & roll!!! So proud of my little man

  5. #5

    Default

    If you choose to go through a rescue group they generally pay all the vet expenses.

  6. #6

    Default

    My rescue group pays all the vet fees... we are always trying to raise funds to help the dogs... fostering can be very rewarding... when you are ready just contact a rescue group near you... let hope the govt don't stuff it up first...

  7. #7

    Default

    Cool thanks!!
    I am looking forward to it
    Sit, drop & roll!!! So proud of my little man

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    The book I suggested will answer all the questions you just asked and more.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #9

    Default

    I always had a good sized run that had 2 metre high fencing and then was roofed with mesh and had a mesh floor and cement around the perimeter, to prevent digging escapes. You always have to allow for a dog that is aggressive with anything at your place - and you can bet that dog will be an escape artist, because when life kicks you in the shins, you can guarantee it will be the day it's wearing steel toe caps. I had the dogs live in the house but if there was a major personality clash, I had allowances. I still have 2 'backyards' here and when I do have a dog here, (rarely now), if there is a clash going on, I try to run the place so there are 2 gates between all potential problems. So slow thinking visitor or brain freeze, one gate not secure still means a fence between. That is a great thing to put in place.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Good on you for volunteering to be a foster carer - rescues can never get enough people to help!!

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