View Poll Results: How much would you pay for a rescue dog?

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  • Over $400

    5 11.11%
  • $300-400

    17 37.78%
  • Under $300

    22 48.89%
  • Nothing - I wouldn't have a rescue

    1 2.22%
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Thread: Rescue Fees

  1. #31

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    So Anne,you say you rescue to make profit?
    So you wouldn't rescue if you didn't make a profit ?
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  2. #32
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    You incur the costs for the failing of your breed - I would not. If a dog had severe HD I would not pay thousands for an operation - it just isn't feasible when there are so many nice young healthy dogs around. If only I could get optimmune for $60 - it's over 100$ here - I know because my RESCUE has pannus. ADR from where she came DO NOT foot the bill for this - I DO. As I do for her vet bills and everything else.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChoppaChop View Post
    So Anne,you say you rescue to make profit?
    So you wouldn't rescue if you didn't make a profit ?
    No, I don't rescue to make a profit Choppa. Think about it. The slight twist on words and emphasis you have done makes it sound very disturbing.

    I rescue to save Pugs and to help those with Pugs in need. I run my rescue so that it makes a profit though.

    If I didn't make a profit I could not run my rescue for very long. Where would the money come from to run it if I didn't make a profit? My family finances can only stretch so far.

    For example - Lilly, a little Pug bitch I have in at the moment has costs me in excess of $800 in veterinary costs, let alone the cost of feeding her. It is easy to say - "hey, why not let her die as there are plenty of other healthy Pugs to save" but this little girl is relatively healthy. Her health costs are due to;
    * A swollen leg that was obviously causing a great deal of pain and xrays were needed to determine if there was a break
    * A long term untreated skin condition and ear infections that required labarotry work to determine the infections for the most effective treatment
    * She was not desexed
    * She was not vaccinated

    She is only 7.5 years of age, is still very playful and spritely and deserves to live. She did not ask to be neglected. She also has slight brachy syndrome but given her age, body type and the level of her condition we have decided against surgery to treat it.

    I will re-home her for $300. I will therefore be in the red by a minimum of $500, and like I said, this does not cover food, wormings, flea treatments of the cost to house her in a snuggly warm bed.

    If I didn't make a profit somewhere, these costs would eventually drown me.

    I believe that people see the word 'profit' and all sensibilities go out the window. Profit must mean someone is benefitting right? Profit must mean that you have spare cash right? - Wrong. The profit I make on a dog that comes in and has no medical needs, is already desexed and vaccinated, goes back into dogs like Lilly.

    As I said, it enables me to provide the care that these dogs needs. Good quality care. Not second rate food and relaince on welfare and donations, but the care that every family pet deserves. Just because they are a rescue Pug, it does not mean that they are an inferior dog.

    As I said, I find the idea that people even question the idea of good business management and rescue rates very insular. The rescue can only charge what the market will pay and, if they are smart enough, they will charge the fee that enables them to run their rescue in a forward capacity.
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  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    No, I don't rescue to make a profit Choppa. Think about it. The slight twist on words and emphasis you have done makes it sound very disturbing.

    I rescue to save Pugs and to help those with Pugs in need. I run my rescue so that it makes a profit though.

    If I didn't make a profit I could not run my rescue for very long. Where would the money come from to run it if I didn't make a profit? My family finances can only stretch so far.

    For example - Lilly, a little Pug bitch I have in at the moment has costs me in excess of $800 in veterinary costs, let alone the cost of feeding her. It is easy to say - "hey, why not let her die as there are plenty of other healthy Pugs to save" but this little girl is relatively healthy. Her health costs are due to;
    * A swollen leg that was obviously causing a great deal of pain and xrays were needed to determine if there was a break
    * A long term untreated skin condition and ear infections that required labarotry work to determine the infections for the most effective treatment
    * She was not desexed
    * She was not vaccinated

    She is only 7.5 years of age, is still very playful and spritely and deserves to live. She did not ask to be neglected. She also has slight brachy syndrome but given her age, body type and the level of her condition we have decided against surgery to treat it.

    I will re-home her for $300. I will therefore be in the red by a minimum of $500, and like I said, this does not cover food, wormings, flea treatments of the cost to house her in a snuggly warm bed.

    If I didn't make a profit somewhere, these costs would eventually drown me.

    I believe that people see the word 'profit' and all sensibilities go out the window. Profit must mean someone is benefitting right? Profit must mean that you have spare cash right? - Wrong. The profit I make on a dog that comes in and has no medical needs, is already desexed and vaccinated, goes back into dogs like Lilly.

    As I said, it enables me to provide the care that these dogs needs. Good quality care. Not second rate food and relaince on welfare and donations, but the care that every family pet deserves. Just because they are a rescue Pug, it does not mean that they are an inferior dog.

    As I said, I find the idea that people even question the idea of good business management and rescue rates very insular. The rescue can only charge what the market will pay and, if they are smart enough, they will charge the fee that enables them to run their rescue in a forward capacity.


    Anne I did not mean for my words to be disturbing. But Because I *know* you,I don't find myself questioning your integrity,not very often anyways

    But the way that post sounds will come across to some and they will say in their heads exactly what I wrote and questioned.

    It's not that I find the word insular,I guess its more the supply and demand tone that sort of *irks* me....it sits in mind with all those we battle against.


    I dont rescue to keep up the ;supply' of 'demand' ( sounds bad-not meant to)
    I rescue when and if I can.
    If I cannot cover costs I cannot help that particular dog in need. Its sad but its the way it is.

    And I dont rehome to make a profit,I rehome so that particular dog gets a second chance at a better life. At times I have not charged at all ( but then things can be different with my breed-we both know this) other times,yes,I have asked a price for them to cover the next dog in line,but not more than $300.

    No offence meant to you Anne
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  5. #35
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    If you set your fees reasonably you would not need to "make a profit". Say you set your fees to $300. This dog costs you $800 - but the next 5 dogs only cost you $200 - thats $500 that can go onto her bills.

    That is sensible.

    Any rescue that is running in so in the red that they need to charge $350 plus for a majority of their dogs needs to rethink best practices.

    I think it's ridiculous to charge $400 for a dog under 12 mo and $350 for a dog over that but not a senior. I could understand perhaps charging $350 for a baby puppy and $300 for dogs 6mo and over and perhaps $200 for seniors (come on - most seniors are desexed, dont have that long to live and will cost their owners far more than a younger dog most times) but $400 for what is probably a young dog with lots of bad habits that is going to require time and effort?

    I am talking larger breeds there - no way does a dog like a pug even starts to accumulate regular vet bills like a larger dog - desexing alone is worlds apart in price.

  6. #36
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    No offence Choppa, but the phrase 'supply and demand' is a marketing term. It is not used in the context that you are talking of.

    All markets work on a supply and demand chain regardless of product and regardless of it being a consumable or a commodity, even philanthropic markets.

    In this case, the product is rescue dogs. No-one rescues to keep up 'supply for the demand' but if they rescue dogs and the 'demand' for rescues dogs is not there, then they would have problems with re-homing and, therefore, they would need to set their prices to reflect this, taking into account the cost to rescue the dog in the first place.

    For any venture to be successful and to maintain longevity, be that a business whose sole purpose is profit or be that a philanthropic of charitable venture that is aimed at a serving a community need, it needs to be set up so that it can run efficiently in the here and now and the long term.

    There is no point in only looking at 'covering the next dog in line' because there is more to rescue than just rescuing dogs and covering their veterinary and health costs.

    For successful rescues, running their operation may also include community engagement and training, operating costs (those such as Staffy Rescue have higher costs as they have kennels, Monikas have rents as well), utlities, marketing and advertising, transportation, replacement of essentials, grooming, and a million other costs that are over and above the actual individual cost of treating one individual dog.

    Occy - just how does one 're-think their practices' when it comes to the welfare of dogs in their care? Should we not spend that additonal money on surgery so that the cost stays at a minimum? Should we feed them cheap no name food so that their health declines or remains as it was when they come in? Do we buy that cheaper disenfectant and not worry about the efficiency of our hygiene practices?

    How does one 're-think their practices' in order to think "cheap"?

    I do not have a poverty mentality and I never will. I will never run my rescue with a poverty mentality either. I run my rescue as a business which is the only sensible way to run one. I look at ingoing and outgoing costs. I look at the market. Combining all my costs, I set my fees.

    As I said, methinks that people see the word 'profit' and all logical thought races out the window. They believe that someone must be running the gravy train. Someone must be living off the rescue. Someone must be pocketing that money. That is where the insular thinking is.

    No rescue is a profitable business to my knowledge, but many reascue make some profit. There is BIG difference.
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    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  7. #37
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    Hmm - how does one rethink best practices?

    Well let's see

    1. Shopping around for vets instead of using one just cause you know it - see what market value for products is
    2. go through wholesalers rather than retailers - this includes food and bedding
    3. strike up conversation with the butcher - they throw out entire drums of off cuts on a daily basis
    4. marketing the group - make sure people know you exist, how you function and how they can help
    5. reconsider the food you feed - there are lots of good basic dog foods. Do you think the rescues I had ate the $130 bags of food I used for Cappy? Pigs arse - they ate good quality food but not super premium. My two now are on Nutrience - if i were to take on a rescue he would be eating Optimum as well as a hell of a lot of raw meaty bones. Rescues don't stay with you for months on end - at least they shouldn't
    6. make sensible decisions - if that dog in the cage looks like it's going to cost thousands ask yourself - can I afford this - if not - leave it there - bleeding hearts don't last very long in rescue! or if they do they become con artists and liars
    7. Buy vet products in bulk
    8. look for sponsors - Uncle Bens/Mars looks after rescue on the border - always have. They're generous with their help - in fact they donated pallets of food to the bushfire appeal and didn't advertise it. Sure their food is not of a quality I would feed my own dogs - but for a rescue? A dog that is going to be with me from a week up to 3 months? It wont kill them.
    9. Make difficult decisions - a dog that has been in care 9 months needs decisions made - either pts or adopt it yourself - trust me, I would have made that decision long before.
    10. Ask for help from local businesses - dog leads, bowls, collars, toys etc are not things a rescue group should have to pay for - I know blackdog always donates to rescue and many other groups do as well.

    So that's 10 ways of bettering best practices - even - shock horror - going cheap - and not one of those ways compromises the welfare of the dog - in fact several improve it.

    BTW supply of GSDs far outstrips demand - might not be that way for pugs, but for the more popular breeds it is a known fact - staffys, gsds, rotties, etc - always more looking for a home than homes looking for a dog.

    No one is suggesting a poverty mentality - but no one has yet answered my question - WHY WHY WHY can one rescue run effectively for many years and still be charging less than $260 whilst another that has only been around a short time be asking $350-400? I don't understand how ones overheads could be so much greater than the others - unless rescue B doesn't actually have best practices and takes in all dogs for however long it takes - thus making them essentially "no kill" which is one of the stupidist ideas to come out of the US since George Bush Snr said to his wife - "how bout a bit of nookie!"

  8. #38
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    Occy, you are telling rescues to suck eggs. There is nothing new or elightening in your suggestions, but there a few weird or invalid points. There is nothing that rescues don't already do in most of what you say.

    All my rescues are treated equally, just like my own Pugs. They eat the same, sleep in the same beds, receive just as much love and equal care. I wouldn't have it any other way. I am not sure why I would want to treat them as second class to be truthful. They are not inferior so why should they receive inferior care? If anything, they need better than mine and they need more.

    I don't descriminate with the dogs I rescue either. If a dog is going to cost me $1,000 or $1 it is given the same consideration. It is a life. A life worthy of living.

    I can operate this way because I operate my rescue as sensible business, and not as a charity. If I operated with a pov mentality, then I would have to say "bad luck little Pug, your surgery costs are going to be too high so you will have to die". The winners are the Pugs. Who loses? Seriously, who loses with the way I operate? No-one.

    No-one loses at all. Those who adopt my rescue Pugs know they have a dog that has had all of its health care concerns looked at and treated when required. They know the dog has lived in my home, is toilet trained, knows how to give and recieve love and is well socialised. They know they are adopting a dog that has been cared for and loved, and they do not think of them as an inferior dog. The people who adopt my Pugs are more than willing to pay $300 plus for a rescue Pug.

    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    Hmm - how does one rethink best practices?
    Well let's see...........................

    ......................So that's 10 ways of bettering best practices - even - shock horror - going cheap - and not one of those ways compromises the welfare of the dog - in fact several improve it.
    Best practice? Best? Do you understand what 'best practice' is? I am not sure you do or even where 'best practice' came into the debate? If we are talking of 'best practice' then I would consider the way I run my rescue as best practice.

    As I said, you have said nothing but common sense. Do you think that I just spend money willfully and without thought? You don't understand what I say then when I say I run my rescue like a business. I look at incoming and outgoing funds. I look at the market. I determine a fee per dog based on all of these factors.


    BTW supply of GSDs far outstrips demand - might not be that way for pugs, but for the more popular breeds it is a known fact - staffys, gsds, rotties, etc - always more looking for a home than homes looking for a dog.
    Yes, I know that this is an issue for many rescues, hence why thier supply and demand equation would see a different fee set to the next rescue who may have a higher demand.

    No one is suggesting a poverty mentality
    Yes you are. By the very fact that you even think that rescues should go out and ask people for charity. As for sponsorship, trust me, there is alot more to it then you realise and noone gives anything away for free for no return.

    - but no one has yet answered my question - WHY WHY WHY can one rescue run effectively for many years and still be charging less than $260 whilst another that has only been around a short time be asking $350-400
    I don't understand how ones overheads could be so much greater than the others - unless rescue B doesn't actually have best practices and takes in all dogs for however long it takes - thus making them essentially "no kill" which is one of the stupidist ideas to come out of the US since George Bush Snr said to his wife - "how bout a bit of nookie!"
    Do you seriously beleive that all rescues have the same overheads and outgoings? Do you seriously beleive that all rescues should be the same price? Why? Should all pure bred pups be the same price too do you think?

    This conversation is so mind numbingly useless. Think how you will. I will continue to run my rescue as I see fit and in a way that IS best practice. I will continue to be able to save EVERY Pug regardless of the issues it has because I can and because I want to. I would advise anyone looking at starting a rescue to look at it as a business and to think of the rescue supporting itself and not relying in charity.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #39
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    How on earth am I telling rescues to suck eggs? You asked a question and I answered it - unlike the same question I keep asking that no one seems to be able to answer.

    Rescue needs community support - we are part of a greater society. What is the point of rescuing some dogs and going - woo look at me - I'm so good? So you help a dog - how does that involve the community in bettering itself? One dog will be replaced by two or three or four...

    Rescue should enrich the society that is happens in, otherwise nothing will ever change the community's thought processes in regards to their treatment of animals. The same goes for looking after kids and adults in need. Ok - so you help one person - grand - but how has that changed society?

    However, if you set up a home that is community funded the community feels as though it is working to better itself. A "wholistic" approach to our world is a far better one to an insular approach IMO. Then again I am entitled to that opinion. What can I do to make my world better and how can I involve as many people as possible!!

    Just because someone doesn't agree with you doesn't make their opinion null and void.

    I don't actually give two craps about how you run your rescue - when did this thread become about pug rescue? It was a general conversation about how much people should charge for rescue and what the community sees as fair. Charge a thousand dollars for all I care. Do you per chance rescue pug crosses as well? Aren't they just as much the responsibility of the pug world as pure breds? Or do you deal with a niche market that is willing to pay what you put forward because you sell a product that they desire and that prices at which you provide this product are "cheaper" than elsewhere?

    Since you are determined to be offended by this thread and poll and determined to make it about your rescue - you say $300 - isn't that a bit excessive? I can imagine paying it for a larger dog or even for a small dog that comes from a generalised rescue that deals with all different kinds of dogs.

    Desexing a 7kg dog is far different from desexing a 30kg one! same for worming, heartworm, flea treatments - all far cheaper for a small dog. Even the precious optimmune goes longer for a small dog and food - for the love of god - FOOD. Flash eats 5-6 cups of SUPER premium food a day - how many days would that feed a pug for?

    If $300 is realistic for a pug then hell - I should tell this other group to start charging $500 per dog...

    Take a look at the poll results - if this is a true cross section of our doggy community, perhaps some people are charging too much. That's all this was ever about.

    Best practice is a defining way in which a business functions - it gives a yes answer to the question "Is this business running at peak effeciency to provide the customer with exactly what they want in the most reasonable manner?"

    You should know by now that questioning my use of language is futile - I have a command that far outstrips most individuals.

    Your continual MISuse of the phrase "poverty mentality" is interesting however - considering that all "poverty mentality" is, is thinking about what one doesn't have instead of what one does have.

    How is seeing the potential in community support even close to poverty mentality?

    How is being sensible about which dogs to save so much as dance around poverty mentality?

    How does suggesting that a certain amount of money is highway robbery skirt around the idea of poverty mentality?

    Just because things can be done cheaper doesn't mean that they are cheapskating nor are they a lesser quality.

    I actually had a look through the internet for adoption rates - aside from the rescue that charges $400 for a dog the next highest is SR that charge $350 - so it is NOT the norm.
    Last edited by Occy; 08-02-2009 at 03:46 PM.

  10. #40
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    I should also mention that I always rehomed my dogs for the vet fee associated - so around $250. I supplied the food - that was my donation. I only ever asked for help when things were desperate - such as when Flash was still a "rescue" and bloated leaving me with a $5000 bill. perhaps I should have charged $400 for all the previous rescues and had this money in the bank just in case...<insert sarcasm>

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