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Thread: What do I need to learn to help a resuced doglet?

  1. #1
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    Default What do I need to learn to help a resuced doglet?

    As you all know, my heart was recently broken by the departure of Rosie from my life... and I have been in touch with the my local Rescue and put myself on the list for a doglet in need.

    So, there is a chance that I will be the adopter of an adult girl who is about to be liberated from a puppy farm situation... obviously she wouldn't come straight to me, there will be some fostering and assessment period in the middle - but what I'd like to know is - What do I need to know about caring for a rescued doglet that has come from god-knows-what-form-of-hell-on-earth that is different to caring for a puppy? Ot do I assume they will know nothing and start at the very beginning, setting rules and safe boundaries, and work with them as if there were a baby puppy, learning everything from scratch?

    I'm keenly aware that emotional baggage will be attached to any rescue, and I want to do my best to ensure that I'm at my best in order to provide the best situation I can for any doglet that I may be blessed with - whether I do get selected for this doglet, or any other...

    Thanks everyone!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkest View Post
    As you all know, my heart was recently broken by the departure of Rosie from my life... and I have been in touch with the my local Rescue and put myself on the list for a doglet in need.

    So, there is a chance that I will be the adopter of an adult girl who is about to be liberated from a puppy farm situation... obviously she wouldn't come straight to me, there will be some fostering and assessment period in the middle - but what I'd like to know is - What do I need to know about caring for a rescued doglet that has come from god-knows-what-form-of-hell-on-earth that is different to caring for a puppy? Ot do I assume they will know nothing and start at the very beginning, setting rules and safe boundaries, and work with them as if there were a baby puppy, learning everything from scratch?

    I'm keenly aware that emotional baggage will be attached to any rescue, and I want to do my best to ensure that I'm at my best in order to provide the best situation I can for any doglet that I may be blessed with - whether I do get selected for this doglet, or any other...

    Thanks everyone!
    Its great you are going to rescue someone, and you can bet it will be a very rewarding and maybe sometimes challanging situation. Any doggie will be privilaged to find a life with you.

    I am no expert here but i would imagine you give him or her the same love as rosie and work on any problem as or if it arises.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  3. #3
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    I think it's hard to know until you know more about this specific doglet.

    With her coming from a puppy farm, you will likely have to teach her things that most dogs learn at the puppy stage. Toilet training, basic indoor manners, possibly walking on lead, etc... I don't think the process would be very different from training a pup, apart from their longer attention span and indeed possibly having to deal with issues that have resulted from their past, like fear or anxiety.

    But hopefully she will just adapt to the good life and adopt you in no time.

    When will you get to meet her?

  4. #4
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    It's probably hard to tell until you meet the dog in question, but I would imagine lots of love, lots of patients and as you said, starting from the begining. She won't have experienced the world outside her kennel, so house training, basic manners and socialisation.

    It's wonderful of you to take on a rescue from such a sad situation, she will appreciate it and love you all the more for it.

  5. #5
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    I really recommend the book "Love Has No Age Limit" from the Pat McConnell series. It covers the most frequently seen situations re adopting older dogs into your home, and is well written so that most people can grasp the principles and apply them so they can confidently reassure the dog.

    I would read this before the dog comes to give you some understanding and confidence and then keep it on the shelf as a reference if you find yourself needing to work through things.

    It's not expensive - here is one online bookstore but if you hunt around you may find a better bargain.

    Also don't forget that the rescue that you get her from will probably be happy to give you advice at any time, even months after you've adopted.
    Last edited by RuralPug; 06-23-2012 at 01:54 PM. Reason: fat finger typos

  6. #6
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    Don't worry. It is a sure bet that the dog will be coming to a far, far better place than she was in.
    Love and care will be what she needs most and then you tackle any issues that come up.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #7
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    Good for you Pinkest, it's such a kind deed to foster dogs and give them a loving home environment.

    I was just looking at the book shops online and the book that Ruralpug has recommended is under $10 on The Book Depository and that includes postage. If you have a kindle it's $7.95 from Amazon. It looks like an interesting book, might get it myself

  8. #8
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    Thank you for taking a Rescue.........The dog will be very lucky to get a home with you

    I have found that with a new Rescue it is also important to give them time.......And as hard as it is, initially not too much loving. Give them food, comfort and some space and peace.

    I love the Pat McConnell books, but i have also found the Jan Fennell home management systems helps dogs.....it really helped us finally help Annabelle, just those last little bits which we never quite got right with training. We just had to set some system at home, which she understood.

    I just think it is great you are doing this
    Pets are forever

  9. #9
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    Thanks everyone. Will definitely get hold of the books - whether we end up with rescue or not, I'm sure it's still information worth its weight in gold just to know about.

    Newfsie, I've noticed a few times that you've talked about leashing your new dogs to you - can you please tell me what that's about? Why you do it, how long you do it for, what assistance does it give the dog? I'm sure it's expained in the books, but I like to hear first hand accounts about how ideas and guides actually work in real-life terms.

    I'm trying really hard not to get my hopes up... I'll be meeting the rescue lady and her current collection of doglets hopefully this week, next comes her home visit to check that what I've told her about us it accurate, and then it's a waiting game - I don't know when or how this girl is going to be "liberated", whether it's willing or forced - I would assume though that it would be soonish, as the rescue lady is already on alert ready to receive her... but then there are the vet checks, the assessments, quarantines etc... so hopefully soon?

  10. #10
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    There are several reasons to do this...........One is potty training. A dog like my Annabelle who had been crated 24/7, had no idea about where to potty. She had never been an indoor dog and had no manners. When we first brought her inside we let her off lead (silly me). Well she ran over all the furniture from dining table to bed to chairs and she just basically went ballistic. Three steps backwards, we put her on the "Nothing in life is for free" system, together with the umbilical system. So she got n food out of a bowl at all........I made up mince/veggie/oats and some special additive balls (satin balls), because she was very very thin too. Every opportunity she did something I liked she got one of these. be it sit, pay attention, calmness, potty in the right place and so on. It also meant I could see any early signs of her wanting to go to the toilet and I was able to curb her total disregard of furniture. She was attached to me the whole time, unless i was at work or she was in our kennel run. I did not allow her of lead anywhere at all initially. We do have a round-yard for our horses and an arena and that is where I introduced her to play and off lead.
    If I had my time over with her again, I wish i would have been able to progress to Jan Fennell straight after that period....it would have given her a better "place" in our pack and she would have been less insecure. I so avoided that system, even though someone had suggested it. I was dead set against it for a few reasons. mainly because she mentions wolves so much...but since having done a lot of pack-study with large number of dogs in many different areas, I realise they are very similar, not the same, but close. i wasted a lot of time with my "closed" mind and single mindedness and because i listened to the wrong people. Hence I now tell people to keep an open mind. Try anything and everything. Something might just be the best for your dog and be absolute sh** for someone else's dog. But I have brought the home management into quite a few people homes with problem dogs and it has had amazing results and is so easy...it is not training it is a separate issue.

    As to back to the umbilical system...it does give you a great bond with your dog. Which i realised in Annabelle's case might have been too close...i should have pulled back a bit earlier. it is why the 3 week fight happened with Tessa. because Annabelle had become possessive of me. So you everything has some negatives.......That probably will never happen in a single dog household and even not if dogs have not been as scared as Annabelle or have another dog in the household as strong as Tessa. I have since I have had Rescues, with most likely similar issues to Annabelle and had no problems, But I have Introduced them differently and I have used my Home management differently. The dogs are more secure with their knowledge that i am their leader ( every human in the household is), quietly, with no force. I cannot believe the peace it brings in a multidog household. At home and out and about......And this I have to thank Jan Fennell for.

    Whatever dog you get it will be lucky, because you care and will love it.........You can never read too much or learn from others. And never make the mistake to only follow one system, because sometimes you need to try something else. If you ever get to deal with Trainers and/or dog behaviour trainers, ask to see them with their dogs. And to me personally it is important how their dogs behave in company of other dogs and people.......I know some Trainers who have great trained dogs with all the titles in the world, but put their dogs near other dogs or in an unexpected environment and they are not social or just aggressive.......I am a firm believer in Social Training first and foremost.....Tiltes and tricks are a great additive
    Good luck.........
    Last edited by newfsie; 06-24-2012 at 04:35 AM.
    Pets are forever

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