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Thread: Car Restraints

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Smile Car Restraints

    Hello,

    I am wondering if any of you have suggestions for dog Car Restraints - it would be for the boot of a Commodore Station Wagon (as the back seats are occupied with 3 child seats).

    Do we buy a crate and have it installed/piggybacked to the bolt where the child restraints are bolted in?

    It is for a 6mth old Labrador.

    Please be specific regarding products/brands and use/installation, this is all very new to me!

    Thank you!
    Hazel.

  2. #2
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    I agree too, with the above. In your situation I feel it would be the best way.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazel View Post
    Hello,

    I am wondering if any of you have suggestions for dog Car Restraints - it would be for the boot of a Commodore Station Wagon (as the back seats are occupied with 3 child seats).

    Do we buy a crate and have it installed/piggybacked to the bolt where the child restraints are bolted in?

    It is for a 6mth old Labrador.

    Please be specific regarding products/brands and use/installation, this is all very new to me!

    Thank you!
    Hazel.
    We have a collapsible black powder-coated crate (bought at Pet Stock) in the back of our Commodore Station wagon...it is tied to the "wiring" dividing the cabin and the back area

  4. #4
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    I personally have never had a crate in the rear section of my cars, simply for the reason that my dogs would not have fitted in them once they were assembled. Lol.

    It is a pain at airports where one has to hold a dog while the crate is being dismantled - even then it's been difficult to get the crate into the back of SUV's. I really do need to invest in a good set of roof rails for our roof rack.

    There are various other options as well re car restraint.
    There is a harness one can attach to the clip/anchors that usually are in the back of most cars.
    Some ppl also use the harness in the back seat, which works well too.
    Some ppl simply have an anchor and use a shortened leash specially for the car that just allows the dog to sit or lie down, but not move any further.

  5. #5
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    Smile


    Thank you everyone for your replies.


    I am in NSW, and there are fines for unrestrained dogs in cars (and rightly so). Does anyone know of the rules/regulations??

    In terms of harnesses in the boot - I wasn't sure if this would be a safe option for the dog if I have other gear in the boot - eg pram, bags, etc.

    SH - thanks for your detailed response, and thank you for raising the issue of heat - online I just saw a fan that can be attached to the dog crate.
    I think I'll ask my RTA Child Seat fitter about hooking it up for me (he is also my mechanic).

    It would be more ideal to have the puppy in the backseat, however the entire back seat is full - 3 Safe & Sound Baby Seats, and will be for some time. I gather the restraints are for dogs sitting on the seats? Not on the floor? Sorry... I have no idea!

    Thanks again everyone, you've given me much food for thought!

  6. #6
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    I've found this info on NSW RSPCA's Facebook page (dated October 2009):

    At this time the RSPCA is calling for an Australian Safety Standard for pet restraints used in motor vehicles. No Australian standard exists for pet restraints at this time.

    The use of harnesses/restraints is recommended to prevent the movement of animals within the cabin of vehicles, however, animal owners should be warned that due to the current lack of a safety standard, a harness may fail if the vehicle is involved in a major accident, or even a minor collision, depending on the circumstances. It must also be mentioned that, depending on the severity of the collision or impact, a restraint harness may still cause injury to a dog. This is because during impact, the harness may apply strong forces to the dog’s body particularly around the chest area in a way that differs from the forces that operate on a human body restrained by a seatbelt.

    The NRMA is currently undertaking tests on pet safety harness restraints. NRMA Vehicle Policy Specialist, Jack Haley says that currently: "Dog harnesses are available to stop the dog running around inside the vehicle but they are not technically designed to restrain the dog in a crash," says Jack. "In station wagons and hatchbacks, cargo barriers provide the best occupant protection."

    RSPC NSW will keep you posted on NRMA’s pet restraint testing study.

    Some groups advocate the use of pet transport containers or crates (appropriately secured within the car – best to check with the manufacturer). This may reduce the ability of the dog to disrupt or distract the driver and may also reduce the likelihood of a dog becoming a projectile during a collision and/or may prevent the dog from jumping out of the car.

    In the meantime, for more information, please visit our RSPCA Knowledge Base at:
    Do I need to restrain my dog when travelling in my car? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Do I need to restrain my dog when travelling in my car?
    Depending on the circumstances, restraining a dog in a car may provide several safety benefits both to the dog and the occupants of the car:

    •the dog cannot move around within the car and therefore has less potential to distract or disrupt the driver
    •in a collision, the dog may be less likely to become a projectile thereby potentially decreasing the risk of injury to the driver or passengers
    •restraint may prevent the dog from jumping out of a moving car’s window which may reduce the risk of injury to the dog and other road users.
    Vehicle restraints for dogs are widely available and include restraints that either attach to existing seatbelts or have buckles that clip directly into the seatbelt. Generally, restraints may be attached to the dog’s collar or harness. RSPCA Australia has been advised that the use of a harness may increase the risk and severity of injury to the dog (depending on the force of impact). This is because during impact, the harness may apply strong forces to the dog’s body particularly around the chest area in a way that differs from the forces that operate on a human body restrained by a seatbelt.


    Some groups advocate the use of pet transport containers or crates (appropriately secured within the car). This may reduce the ability of the dog to disrupt or distract the driver and may also reduce the likelihood of a dog becoming a projectile during a collision and/or may prevent the dog from jumping out of the car. While RSPCA Australia does not have a specific policy on the appropriate restraint of dogs in cars we do have a policy regarding containers for transport. The container should enable the animal to lie down flat, turn around, stand erect and stretch with clearance.


    Another method, for drivers with station wagons, is to put the dog behind a cargo barrier. This may not prevent an injury to the animal in the event of a collision but may help to prevent the animal from harming the human occupants.

    At this stage, RSPCA Australia considers that further research is needed to determine the safest and most effective way of restraining dogs and other pets in cars in order to reduce the risk of injury to the animal, driver; other occupants in the car and other road users.


    We recommend that you consult your Road Traffic Authority website to find out about the road rules involving animals in your specific state/territory. In NSW for example, the RTA road user's handbook states ithat:

    •A driver, motorcycle rider, bicycle rider or passenger must not lead an animal, including by tethering, while the vehicle is moving. Animals should be seated or housed in appropriate areas
    •A driver must not drive with an animal in the driver’s lap
    Last edited by Hazel; 01-11-2010 at 06:00 PM.

  7. #7
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    Fines for unrestrained dogs | Dogue | Dog car restraints

    And I also found this:

    Police get hot over the collar
    CAROLINE MARCUS
    October 25, 2009

    CLICK CLACK front and … bark?

    Next time Rover comes on a car trip, think before you allow him to stick his head out the window or climb on your lap.

    Drivers caught with unrestrained dogs risk fines of more than $400, with 170 people charged over the offence since the pet-related road rule was introduced in NSW in July.

    The legislation, which stipulates that motorists must not drive a vehicle with an animal on their lap or preventing them from having proper control of the car, carries a penalty of three demerit points and $338, rising to $422 in a school zone.

    A NSW Police spokeswoman said of the 170 offenders, four had been caught in school zones.

    If an animal is injured as a result of being unrestrained, owners also face up to six months' jail and fines of up to $5500 under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. The RSPCA managing inspector, Matthew French, said that even the Australian tradition of conveying dogs untethered on the back of utes could land drivers with on-the-spot fines of $500 under the Act.

    ''It is something we very commonly see,'' Mr French said. ''It is an offence to have a dog on a moving vehicle on a public street unless it's restrained.

    ''It is just such an incredibly dangerous thing to do, to have a dog unrestrained on the back of a vehicle. You cannot transport an animal in any way that inflicts pain.''

    An RTA NSW spokeswoman said there were a range of options available to owners wanting to restrain animals.

    ''Pet transport containers or carriers, if appropriately secured within the car, may reduce the likelihood of the animal distracting the driver and may prevent the animal from jumping around inside the vehicle or jumping out of the car,'' the spokeswoman said.

    Dogue, a pet store with branches in Bondi and Manly, reported a rush on sales of car restraints since July.

    The store sells harnesses in sizes XS to XL, ranging in price from $15 to $50, with restraints that buckle the harnesses to car seats retailing for $15.50.

    ''When the law came out, a lot of people came in to buy the harnesses,'' said Sarah Halling of Dogue in Bondi.

    ''We would have two or three people a week come in. A couple of people had been pulled over with a dog on their lap. People are freaking out.''

  8. #8
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    We use a harness and short leash in the boot of our Ford Territory. Like you, we have kids car seats in the back.

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