Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Snake Repeller

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
    Posts
    513

    Default Snake Repeller

    Has anyone used this product or something similar?

    Snake Repeller

    If it works it sounds like a very effective way of keeping pets and kids safe from snakes without causing any harm to the reptiles.

    Certainly up here the snake catchers are totally useless unless the snake is a python. Call them about a venemous snake and they are suddenly very busy.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    They do not work. Regardless or whether or not it is putting out vibrations, the snake will sense no threat and will continue to go where it wants to. They are most certainly smarter then most people will lead you to believe

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
    Posts
    513

    Default

    Oh well, back to the shotgun and shovel methods I guess.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I've heard they don't work too (the snake repellers).

    I've got a friend with several small puppies and some bigger children and she used your method plus built a "snake proof fence" around a backyard sized dog run (on a farm). This involved spending a lot of money on concrete, fine mesh to about 1.2m high, going into and under the concrete, and on contractors to install it all. She's got several other "snake proof" cages or cat or dog runs, but I figure if there is rat sized poo in those, that snakes can get in if they want to. She said the rat poo was from a small flying possum sugar glider but I found that hard to believe.

    She also has snake traps around the house but I don't know if they work or not.

    RSPCA sells a gadget you can attach to a tap that allows a dog to get water by licking the toggle. This would help keep water sources that snakes look for away from the house or at least away from where the dogs are.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 09-10-2009 at 01:07 PM. Reason: clarity

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    I honestly don't understand the mentality of killing snakes. You are far more likely to be bitten by attempting to kill a snake then you are but standing back and watching it be on its way.

    I find, as a reptile lover who has researched this topic many a time, that kids and pets are a poor excuse for killing them. Kids are easily taught not touch them (as I've taught kids myself), and animals are easy, but not quite a easy. I know for a fact that I can trust Leo with all of my snakes, and he will not touch them. I've watched him a few times sitting outside watching and sometimes barking at the wild snakes that come into our yard (browns and pythons thus far). Dogs are easy, but cats are not. Cats, however, should be inside (this is my opinion and the opinion of everyone else who values our native fauna), else they kill them. Simple.

    As you can probably tell, I have had this conversation a fair few times. Honestly, they were here first, they deserve to be here. If you kill snakes, you help the rat population flourish (as this is pretty much all snakes want). I'd much rather a brown snake take up residence in my house then a rat or two.

    This wasn't a stab at anyone. Just my opinions on things I simply found the shotgun and shovel comment upsetting.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    845

    Default

    I can well understand your view on snakes silvershadowwolf and I respect them. However, I have had a dog die from a snake bite and I won't allow them in my house yard. They can go about their business in the bush and they don't worry me, they are a beautiful reptile and I admire them. As you say they were here first. My pharaoh hound has killed a few in my yard but he is doing what a sight hound does. I can relate to what DH said as I too have killed some.
    The more people I meet, the more I like my dogs.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    silvershadowwolf

    I think it depends on the type of snake and why they are where they are.

    I used to share a feed shed with a brown snake and it was a big one. We knew where its hole was and we used to warn it (or encourage it to go down the hole) by throwing buckets at the shed and in the shed door, and help our own safety by wearing gum boots in the feed shed no matter how hot it was. Never had a problem with it attacking anything.

    But tiger snakes and red belly blacks are another problem. They don't always leave, they do stand up for themselves, and when there's one a week coming into the house! you've got to do something. This was during a drought and at a house that used to have no pets or children, and then was sold to a friend of mine that had pets, children, horses and all that.

    Personally I'd rather not risk being bitten by a very poisonous snake any time I walk round my own house or yard. The bush is different and they're usually more spread out there, where there are no or few man made water or food concentrations.

    First wild snake I ever encountered directly was a baby brown snake in my office workplace in Canberra, close to the Dairy flat swamps. That particular snake we caught under an office bin, and the snake man came and took it away. We used to get small birds, and mice and rats and the occasional possum in that office too. It's been demolished and replaced by fancy townhouses now - I wonder if they get snakes.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    I do see where your coming from (not that I agree with it at all). When you say what type of snake, would you be willing to kill any you don't recognise? Or only those that you can recognise as deadly. I certainly hope no one here would kill a python just because it's in the house. All pythons can easily be removed outside.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    845

    Default

    Definitely not. I have had carpet snakes living in my ceiling and they never worried me. Great for keeping the rat population down as I had them in the ceiling at the time. The python did a great job.
    The more people I meet, the more I like my dogs.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    What about every other kind of python? I'm curious, because I don't know about most other communities (such as this dog one), but are most people here actually able to tell a python from a venomous snake?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •