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Thread: Snake Repeller

  1. #11
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    Where I come from in S W QLD, there are very few pythons. Most snakes are tiger, blacks and death adders. Here, on my property, I have only seen browns and blacks...there is no mistaking them.
    The more people I meet, the more I like my dogs.

  2. #12
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    That's pretty high up for tiger snakes. There, you'd also get some pythons like stimsons pythons, womas and black headed pythons. I agree with you that there is no mistaking browns or blacks (except browns for king browns, which is a kind of black snake). It's pretty confusing

    It is reassuring to know, however, that some people are willing to leave what it harmless alone.

  3. #13
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    I've never seen a python in the wild, but I reckon they'd be ok to have around, or not too much of a problem to re-locate. Carpet Pythons mostly have a much prettier skin than your average tiger or red belly black. Red belly black snakes are as they suggest, really black with really bright underbelly. Tigers and brown snakes can look very similar but they act differently.

    Pythons usually have biggish heads, and the poisonous snakes often have quite small heads. I have seen a tv show that had a "python" of some sort, which was plain brown with a small black head and looked very like a mulga snake (very dangerous and definitely known to hang around camps and not leave when people are walking around). That one might be in trouble if I saw it inside a house.

    The only one I've had the opportunity to deal with directly was the 30cm baby brown which was fairly easy to catch under a standard metal office waste paper bin. The bin was deeper than it was long so difficult for it to reach anything important. The other brown snakes I've met have been very quick to leave and do not reappear so long as a lot of stomping and noise is involved.

    I've seen a jack russell take on a red-bellied black and that was scary, and that snake was in the garden against the house. Very bad. That family have lost several jack russells to those snakes. Someone else dealt with the snake with a shovel though I think the JR had killed it already.

  4. #14
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    I'm afraid tiger snakes look very very different to red bellies and brown snakes.

    Here's a photo of a very nice tiger snake. Notice the boofy head. These are almost exclusively found in the Southern areas of Australia, since they do not deal with lots of heat very well.
    http://museumvictoria.com.au/bioinfo.../scutlive4.jpg

    This is a young Eastern brown snake (only young animals have any kind of banding on them). Notice the thinner head shape. Also, pretty much the only way to definitively identify an Eastern brown snake is the red spots on its belly. You'll see these if the snake rears up (as most of them do when treatened).
    http://cms.jcu.edu.au/idc/groups/pub...006377~7.3.jpg

    However, please don't mistake a brown snake for one of these:http://www.reedysreptiles.com/fullsize/Water.jpg
    Or these:
    http://64.17.184.245/images/1-a-1/Ol...%20-%20018.JPG

    Both of the latter two are pythons. The first is a water (identifiable by the two different colours underneath- notice how it is white underneath its head, but yellow elsewhere) and the second is an olive python.

    Hyacinth, was the snake on the tv show something like this?
    http://www.whozoo.org/Intro2000/tany...Z102701_20.jpg


    Mulga snakes (a.k.a king brown snakes) are fun They stand up for themselves, but are generally not too aggressive if left alone. They do, however, have the biggest venom yield (and it is venom, not poison) of any venomous snake, due to their large venom glands. This is why they have big boofy heads.

    As for red bellies. I love red bellies. Red bellies and collett's snakes (link below). These are both extremely placid snakes when not threatened. Their venom is also fairly weak. There have been no human deaths from either of these snakes in the last five decades or so. These are also recommended as a first venomous snake to any snake keeper interested in vens, due to their placid nature and how they readily adapt to captivity and being handled (even free handling, but a hook is also advisable for better control over the snake).

    Collett's: http://www.worldofstock.com/slides/NAN7301.jpg

  5. #15
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    Great pictures Silvershadow. I'm from the UK and have only been here 3 years. I'm still greatly ignorant about the whole snake thing and still freak when I see anything. The only snake I know for sure I have seen is a green tree snake which I know is completely harmless but I still wasn't happy.

    I shall keep those pictures on this comp so I can refer to them if needed (God, I hope they won't be needed)

    I definitely wouldn't kill anything though, I'd be too scared. If in doubt about whether it was venomous or not I would get a professional involved.
    The best things in life, aren't things

  6. #16
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    Although not experts husband and self have a reasonable knowledge of reptiles as we used to be registered wild life carers in Vic.

    I don't kill anything unless it poses a threat to those I care about. A venomous snake around children and pets is a threat.

    Like you I am very fond of the red bellied black snake. When we lived in Vic we had a particular favourite who hibernated under the house every winter, directly underneath the pot belly stove. Being shy and timid he was never a problem so we left him alone.

    Tiger snakes are aggressive and any Tigers around the house were dispatched using the shot gun, a quick and humane method IMO. Any snake in the paddocks or scrub was left alone. That was their territory. The house and yard is mine.

    Around here we had a lot of Scrub Pythons. Yes, I know thats not the correct name but it's easier to spell. They are quite a bold snake and although non venomous can give a nasty bite. A good sized Scrubbie can easily eat a Wallaby and no one around here bothers to keep chooks any more. The house behind us lost all their chooks and a small dog to a Scrubbie.

    Every few weeks there is a report in the paper of someone's pet being eaten, often inside the house. A couple of years ago a woman ended up in hospital after going to sleep with her bedroom window open. A Scrubbie came through the window and onto the bed, taking advantage of the woman's body heat. When the woman rolled over in her sleep the snake, feeling threatened, attacked. At the time all I could think of was silly woman. Why didn't you have fly screens?

    As I said before snake catchers simply make excuses not to come out for a venomous snake. Last time we had one they actually told us to catch it and let it loose at the river!! Finally my neighbour, an Indiginous school teacher, expertly caught the snake and beheaded it with the machete she used for coconuts. End of snake. Last time I ever ate a coconut cut by that machete.

    If the snake had been a python the snake catchers would have come immediately. If it had been a Scrubbie they would have been fighting each other to collect it. If the snake catchers won't help with venomous snakes what the hell is one to do?

    I was looking for something completely different when I came across the snake repeller. It sounded like a good invention if it worked. No need to kill snakes if they stay away.

  7. #17
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    In captivity, tiger snakes are quite dopey. I know quite a few people who prefer tigers over their red bellies, as theirs are quite docile. In fact, the only reason tigers aren't recommended as a first venomous snake is due to their venom being more potent than that of a red belly or collett's. I also know a few people that handle tiger snakes as soon as their born, as they seem reluctant to bite (of course, there are always a few individuals out of the norm).

    Yes, you are correct. The Australian version is a scrub python (Morelia kinghorni). The New Guinea version is an Amethystine python (Morelia amethystina). There is not much difference between them except that the Australian version gets bigger then the New Guinea version. I agree with you, scrubbies are quite bold. They want to go somewhere and they want to go there now

    Just to clarify, are you saying that there are tiger snakes in Cairns? Or did you only encounter them in Victoria?

    Tkay, the best solution for getting over snakes is getting one as a pet ^^ I'm kidding, but snakes make lovely pets. Not at all affectionate, but extremely easy and fun to care for. If you're ever interested in trying to identify reptiles, then "A Complete Guide to Reptiles in Australia", by Steve Wilson and Gerry Swan, is very extensive and a good guide. Or for something a little more simple, "Field Guide to Australian Reptiles", by Stephen Swanson is an excellent book. The latter doesn't quite have everything, but who needs to know all the subspecies of the common fence skink?

  8. #18
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    silvershadowwolf24

    I had to do some fiddling to see the BHP? python pic as the whozoo reports an error for direct links to their jpgs (to stop bandwidth theft).

    And yes, that brown snake, small black head, looks a lot like some of the mulga snake colour variations.

    Until I saw that snake I thought I'd know the difference between a venomous snake and a python but afterwards - not so sure.

    There are adult tiger snakes that don't have well defined stripes. A bit like there are redbacks without the red bum. And sometimes you don't get much time for a good look - all you see is the tail disappearing somewhere you don't want it to be like into the car innards or under the house. Not that it would make much difference between a brown or a tiger if that happened.

    Your reedy reptile pic and your olive pic have exactly what I think of as a typical python head. So I wouldn't mistake that for a brown or a tiger.

    Never seen a collett's snake - it's very pretty. The red belly blacks I've seen around my friends houses did not seem very peaceful, and I think they do have enough venom to kill a small dog - especially if the owner is at work when the dog gets bitten or it's a long way to the vet. The ones I've seen are also much longer than my arm and I'm not sure I'd be safe if I used a long handled broom either so I don't think I'd want to push my luck trying to relocate. And some reptiles (sleepy lizards marked with red nail polish) will return several kilometres after being relocated to get to the strawberry patch.

    I have learned a lot. Mostly I don't worry too much about snakes, I stomp along and I don't usually see them. I do respect people like Deerhound's right to keep their house and immediate yard clear of snakes. Bees and wasps in my backyard are more of a worry.

  9. #19
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    My apologies, that wasn't there last night (the whozoo image). Perhaps a little something more like this: http://www.aspidites.co.uk/blackhead1.jpg (note that not all of them have such vivid banding).

    Colouring is not a good method of identifying snakes, because sometimes you can variations of the norm (or also do if they're species like tigers or coastal carpets). Usually you look for head size and shape and location. Tiger snakes will always have that boofy head (similar to mulga snakes, but have different scalation).

    Tiger (Tasmanian locality): http://k53.pbase.com/g3/23/341923/2/...assietiger.jpg
    Mulga (NT locality, I believe): http://www.oceanwideimages.com/image...ulga-snake.jpg

    I realise people have the right to their property, I just find it unfair seeing as how their property was built over the snakes' habitat. For that reason, they made the law that it is illegal to kill snakes (it applies to all of Australia's native fauna), but it isn't enforced, as is the same with every law pertaining to reptiles.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by silvershadowwolf24 View Post

    Just to clarify, are you saying that there are tiger snakes in Cairns? Or did you only encounter them in Victoria?
    I was talking about when we lived in Vic. I would think the only Tiger snakes one would find this far north would be in a zoo.

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