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Thread: Acute Kidney Failure and its Outcome. Positive Stories Needed :(

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I used to have redbacks in my shed. And then my brother told me about spider bombs.

    No more redbacks. At all. It's great. And it's been months.

    I also like surface spray, that slows them down a bit. Poor dog though. Red backs have a reputation for a reason. Do they have anti venom for it?
    Im sure they do but it would only work after the bite had taken place and also if we were 100% that was the cause. See how we go anyway. I'll take some extra precautions around the yard and such when he comes home. He's inside 80% of the time but get's up to mischief when I working on my car or the house.
    Went in to see him today and he's much better so far. Get him back on food and he can come home hopefully around Monday. Feeling cautiously positive today compared to yesterday.

  2. #12
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    I have always though that redback bites are harmless to dogs. But I found this: Spider Bite | Australian Venom Research Unit

    It doesn't mention kidneys and you should've seen other symptoms if it was the cause.

    I just leave our redbacks. Even when I had a toddler - she was taught about the dangers at a very early age. We manage to co-exist quite well and I reckon the relatively small risk of getting bitten when you know they're around is not worth the health risks of using strong poisons. But that's just me.

    I hope your dog will recover fully and that they find out what caused it, PGB.

  3. #13

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    You can get acute renal failure in dogs from grapes, raisins, sultanas, fruitcake... Go for gold and gobble fruit and nut chocolate... Only need to get at Easter eggs in large nos, or a bowl of grapes, lots of things, and it does seem some dogs are much more sensitive than others.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Menageriemanor View Post
    You can get acute renal failure in dogs from grapes, raisins, sultanas, fruitcake... Go for gold and gobble fruit and nut chocolate... Only need to get at Easter eggs in large nos, or a bowl of grapes, lots of things, and it does seem some dogs are much more sensitive than others.
    This is very true and sometimes to get an effective treatment you need to find out why it happened......Acute renal Failure does not have a really positive out look, but it does depend on the levels.
    I suppose blood tests were done such as Urea and Electrolytes? It is the numbers in that that will tell you what the outcome is likely to be

    Causes
    Toxic injury, Aminoglycoside antibiotics, Tetracyclines antibiotics, Ethylene glycol (antifreeze), Grapes or raisins, Mycotoxins, Decreased blood flow, Dehydration, Hemorrhage, Congestive heart failure, Septic shock, Heatstroke, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, Renal vascular thrombosis (blood clots), Leptospirosis infection, Kidney obstruction.

    Treatments
    Treatment of renal kidney disease is aimed at preventing or slowing further kidney damage. One phase to treat kidney is to "restart" it. The large quantities of intravenous fluids are given to "flush out" the kidneys. This flushing process, called diuresis, helps to stimulate the kidney cells to function again. If enough functional kidney cells remain, they may be able to adequately meet the body's needs for waste removal. Fluid therapy includes replacement of various electrolytes, especially potassium. Other important aspects of initial treatment include proper nutrition and drugs to control vomiting and diarrhea. The possible outcome of these treatment, the kidneys will resume functioning and continue to function for a few weeks to a few years. Also the kidneys will resume functioning during treatment but fail again as soon as treatment stops or maybe the kidney will not return. Another phase of treatment is to keep the kidneys functioning as soon as possible. First method, the dog will undergo a speical diet which the food contains low in protein, low in phosphorus, and not acidified. Another method is a phosphate binder where phosphorous is removed from the body by filtering through the kidneys and once the filtration process is impaired, phosphorous begins to accumulate in the blood. Another process is giving a drug to regulate the parathyroid gland and calcium levels. Calcium and phosphorus must remain at about a 2:1 ratio in the blood. The increase in blood phosphorus level stimulates the parathyroid gland to increase the blood calcium level by removing it from bones. Once the dog is stabilized, fluids can be given under the skin (subcutaneously). This serves to continually "restart" the kidneys as their function begins to fail again. This is done once daily to once weekly, depending on the degree of kidney failure.

    Another option is kidney transplants and dialysis and becoming more accessible for pets today, but due to the high costs, aren’t practical for most pet owners. Many cases that the dogs with renal failure are successfully managed and live long happy lives. Common prevention of such dog diseases it to have a regular laboratory testing preformed with the yearly vet visit can help to detect early stages of renal failure before they appear, and starting early treatment can help to slow or halt loss of kidney function to improve the pet's quality of life.
    Pets are forever

  5. #15

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    Found out a short while ago he was misdiagnosed and in fact has Addisons Disease. It's fairly common to mix the two up apparently because they have similar symptoms. It's not great but it is a better outcome and can be managed with medication for the rest of his days.
    Thanks for all the info and support it was good to vent and discuss lol. I'll let you all know when he gets home

  6. #16

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    Very pleased that you finally have an answer and you can now move forward with the help of medication for your pup !

  7. #17
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    Well that is good news......It is difficult to recognize initially, but once it is diagnosed, it can be successfully treated. Much more positive out look compared to Renal failure
    Pets are forever

  8. #18

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    Not going to help you but you can impress the literati amongst your friends, as that is what Jane Austen suffered from.

  9. #19
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    Good to have a diagnosis and treatment plan! I had to google it as I didn't know what it was and found this: AddisonDogs | What Is Addison's Disease

  10. #20

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    haha Yeah, None of my friends would know Jane Austin and all I could think of was Steve :P
    He came home this morning He responded to the treatment really well overnight and I got a call this morning to pick him up. He seems lethargic but I think its more that he's had a big feed and glad to be home. He was going crazy when I went to get him lol.
    A big thanks to the crew Anthony Westwood Vet Clinic in Engadine for treating him and keeping me informed every step of the way. A really couldn't thank them enough. Not sure it's effective saying so here but it has to be said. Even the bill wasn't as bad as I thought and would have paid double for the diagnosis and service.

    Back home where he belongs
    Last edited by PGB; 05-13-2012 at 12:54 PM.

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