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Thread: Allergic to protein

  1. #1
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    Default Allergic to protein

    So, I was baby-sitting for a friend today and during that time had to walk her 2 dogs (and two kids ). When I met her dogs I immediately noticed the skin problems with her two Staffy's. I asked her if she had taken them to the vet about it. She stated that her vet said one or both dogs were allergic to protein and that she has to feed them food that costs $150 a month for one dog. She said it was "hydrolised" or something. Bascially removes most of the protein from the food so it's barely detectable and helps the dogs, or so I understood from her explanation.

    I was wondering if anyone else has or knows of a dog allergic to protein. I took some photos in hopes of maybe re-diagnosing as the current (expensive) food doesn't seem to have helped the skin in any way. If it's not a protein allergy, what else could it be? If it is a protein allergy, is there other food that she could be feeding her dogs that doesn't cost $150 a month per dog. She is a single mum with two boys, so anything to keep costs down would obviously help a lot.

    If anyone has any info, that would be great

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  2. #2
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    That looks very similar to the skin issue Mojo had but i didnt let it get that bad and it seems to only effect the underside of him and his legs. I'm sorry but for the life of me i cant recall what it was called or what caused it.... but switching from Eukanuba puppy food to Royal Canin giant breed puppy food and washing every 2nd day with Malaseb for about a fortnight went along way to cleaning it up. I had to leave the shampoo on for 10-15 minutes and not towel dry him.

    These days i still use the Malaseb as a shampoo about once a month only because the fur hasnt really grown back. There's a bald spot about the size of a 50 cent piece on his front leg and once in a while it'll still go a bit scabby. As soon as i notice it doing this i cover it in Benadine aswelll and it clears up again.

    I'm no expert, just wanted to share my experience with somthing that looked similar. Whatever it is i hope you can help them out. Good luck.


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  3. #3
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    How long have they been on the new diet? If they are not having protein now, shouldn't the issue be resolving? I notice that the areas don't appear red, so maybe they are beginning to resolve. Also, I'm curious as to how the vet diagnoses it?

    My Duke is highly allergic, although we have been unable to totally determine the cause. Some vets believe it's flea allergy dermatitis, and some believe it's a food allergy. I've tried a number of different things, including special diets. Maybe your friend could try a fish oil supplement in their meals? A lot of "special" diets just have fish oils in them. It is good for building a protective layer at the skin, which helps prevent flare ups. A large bottle from the vet is dear as poison ($90ish) but does last a long while. You may be able to find a cheaper alternative. Also, I've found that when my boy does have flare ups, salt water rinses are very helpful, and can often help me avoid multiple vet visits.

    Also, maybe antihistamines can help? Dogs can take the human ones if you get the doseage right.

  4. #4
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    I'm pretty sure my dog is allergic to commando crawling - especially on grass. Not so bad on beach sand. Not good on concrete. But the grass in summer really aggravates her tummy rash. I know a staffy with similar skin problems who also likes to commando crawl.

    Sometimes it's diet related and sometimes it's environmental - ie from where the dog lives or walks. And sometimes it's genetic, eg one dog will get it but another on the same diet and living in the same place - won't.

    Not sure how it's possible for a dog to be allergic to protein and survive because it's an important component of their diet. But sometimes it can be a specific protein eg allergic to beef or chicken so swapping to a food that has none of this can help. Sometimes it's actually a gluten problem so swapping to a rice based food with no oats or wheat in it helps. For example a lot of dogs with allergices do well on Nutro Turkey and Rice kibble because it's got no gluten and no beef or chicken, but it is expensive.

    Black Hawk Holistic is cheaper but it has oats in it. But it's mainly lamb and rice. But it does depend what the dog is allergic to. I don't think I'd accept "protein allergy" without knowing which protein, and I wouldn't buy the food from the vet. I've had vets and vet nurses trying to sell me stuff they haven't even read the ingredient list of. Eg Chicken and rice in a can is not better than boiled chicken and rice you made yourself (good for short term treatment of tummy upsets but not as good as changing to a different brand of dog food).

  5. #5
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    Hi Belinda, I am helping a dog now that is allergic to meat protein and the more I delve into this the more common it seems to be. The frequency of this has motivated me to develop vegan versions (puppy & adult) of Augustine's Super Food. Being a vegan food even I was surprised that dogs are scoffing it down. It far exceeds the nutritional requirements of dogs and all info will be outlined on our website which will be launching any day now, all that is left to change servers.

    I just made a fresh batch on Sunday so if your friend would like to try it on her dogs she is more than welcome.

  6. #6
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    Hey, long time no see. How's Augie? I'll be at the park tomorrow arvo (Thursday) and we can chat about it. I think I read about your vegan version on Facebook the other day. I wonder if it will be comparable in price, as the $150 a month she is currently spending is a lot! Need to find something a little nicer to the hip pocket.

  7. #7
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    that looks like Demodectic mange, not uncommon in SBTs. Has she been to a specialist who has tested for this or just a vet making a guess. The dogs should have had 1) skin scrapings/biopsies, 2) allergen testing and 3) general/thyroid blood tests before whacking them on that food.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    that looks like Demodectic mange, not uncommon in SBTs. Has she been to a specialist who has tested for this or just a vet making a guess. The dogs should have had 1) skin scrapings/biopsies, 2) allergen testing and 3) general/thyroid blood tests before whacking them on that food.
    I would be doing the same........if not done, get another vet. Surely you need to find out what the problem is

    Hope the pups are soon better
    Pets are forever

  9. #9
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    Augustine the vegan dog food you promote is very low in protein, how do dogs live on it considering their digestive tract is not really made to use plant protein instead of meat protein. Wouldnt you be better off bumping it up to over 25% for the average adult dog? 15-17% is extremely low.

  10. #10
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    Good question Nekhbet. At first glance one can easily mistake our food for lacking protein however it is a fresh food. Dog food that is higher than 25% protein is generally in biscuit form and essentially it is a concentrate that lacks moisture. When we read references about optimum protein levels they are referring to a dry matter basis. You will find that for a wet food our products are at optimum levels.

    Dogs that eat dry food naturally drink more to compensate for the lack of moisture in the food, so to accurately compare a wet food to a dry food it's important to consider how much more water a dog needs to drink to feel hydrated... in comparison if you were to dry our foods out their protein levels would be well above 25%. If you were to take into account the amount of water a dog drinks on a dry food diet then their levels fall well below 25%.

    What surprised even me is the increased performance in dogs eating the vegan versions. All in all I like to evaluate things as a whole and I have seen the difference time and time again between dry food and fresh food.

    I hope that my response is of value to you, there is some information about it on our website (Key Benefits page & Protein & Fat page).

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