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Thread: Hip Dysplasia

  1. #1

    Default Hip Dysplasia

    Two weeks ago we found out that are beautiful 14 month old Labrador/Border Collie has Hip Dysplasia in both Hips. We were recomended to have his hips replaced but at $12,000 that is out of the question. Another suggestion was to have the Fermeral(?) head removed from the top of his hind legs therefore preventing any bone on bone issues, the third treatment is maintenance.
    At the moment we are trying Glucosomine and Omega 3 and may look into other things down the track.
    For most of the time Zigby appears happy and shows very little signs of discomfort, the first time was two weeks ago after tearing around at the beach with a Border Collie and again tonight he is sore perhaps after a busy weekend with a puppy - although most of the play was done from a lying position. We are limiting his exercise, he is walked only on a lead when around other dogs and is left to run 'off leash' in a paddock near home when he is by himself.
    I don't know what I SHOULD be doing for him, I am too emotional to discuss things with our Vet as I was left feeling that if we did not do the Hip Replacement I was sentencing Zigby to a life of pain. We lost our last dog Harvey only 16 months ago and I do not want to put our young sons (5 and 2) through the trauma of losing their fur friend again so soon. We love Zigby and would love him to be with us for many more happy years.
    Can anyone who has had experience with a young dog with Hip Dysplasia offer me some advice and first hand experience - what can I do for him? and how can I do it?
    Thanks
    Zigby

  2. #2
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    This is my unprofessional opinion.

    For starters, make sure he stays on the lean side. Any extra weight will just put stress on the joints.

    Some dogs live perfectly happily with hip displasia. It seems like "hip replacement" is the answer you get when you ask "how do we fix it?" - instead of "how do we manage it?" or "what would you do if it was your dog?". It does depend how bad it is - there is a range from OMG useless - to a bit loose.

    I have heard of a new treatment that a lot of vets are using on their own dogs - which involves injecting stuff into the joint. Maybe the dog's own platelet cells or stem cells - something like that. It might be worth waiting until that is more available - given its a young dog.

    Meanwhile - as you are doing - restrict exercise. But also find out how bad it is in the scheme of things - is that op really your best option, what are your other options?

    ACVS - Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

    Managing hip dysplasia in puppies, Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis, JPS | Adelaide Animal Hospital

  3. #3
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    I don't have any advice to give, but I think it is sickening that a vet could charge someone $12,000.00 to fix that. That's really playing on people's love for their pets

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for your messages. I have looked into Stem Cell therapy as it is availble at a number of Vets in Melbourne, this procedure will cost about $1500 -$2000 and will last anywhere from 6 months to 3 years. Again it is not our lack of love for Zigby that prevents us for doing this but the harsh realities of life, we are currently a single income family with two small boys and all these procedures can begin to add up very quickly.
    I will speak with the Vet and also try to get a second opinion about treatment if the Vet will give us the Xrays as he refused my Husband last week!
    Any more advice would be most welcome.
    Many Thanks
    Kate

  5. #5
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    Pain medication, physical therapy, steady exercise and weight management are the four biggest factors when taking the non surgical route in regards to hip dysplasia.
    As a vet nurse, I see many families, couples and single pet owners come in, who love their animals dearly, but don't always have the necessary funds to pay for whatever treatment is necessary. Fortunately there are often other alternatives. I'm sure if you be honest with your vet and explain your financial situation and mention what I and Hyac have suggested, they will be more than happy to help with medication, a nutrition plan and specialists in canine physical therapy. Good luck!
    Education not Legislation

  6. #6

    Default

    I have a 4yo dog who has severe bilateral hip displaxia. She has had it since birth and manages fine at this stage. As mentioned above the main things for management is a) keeping her lean b) a good diet (raw is best products like BARF, Complete Meal and Leading RAW) c) supplements d) restricted high impact exercise the extra things that I do include e) hydrotherapy (lots of swimming as it is low to no impact but builds muscle strength) and f) seeing a chiropractic vet on a regular occasion (every 3 months or when needed).
    Since I implemented these things above she has been much better, she doesn't ever limp anymore and doesn't appear to be in any great pain (I am sure there IS pain but she doesn't show it).
    Keira will never have hip replacement surgery it isn't on the cards, it is a huge surgery with a huge recovery period. I will give her the best life she can have until her quality of life is no longer what it should be. In saying that watching how she is now I believe she has a few good years left in her (even though I was told she wouldn't make 5years old).

    So if I were you my first port of call now would be a GOOD chiropractic vet who can give you the right supplements, set out an exercise plan etc.

    ETA - Jadie that is actually quite cheap for bilateral hip replacement, every one that I have heard of is $18,000...
    Last edited by Keira & Phoenix; 11-16-2011 at 08:56 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    ETA - Jadie that is actually quite cheap for bilateral hip replacement, every one that I have heard of is $18,000...
    That's even worse !!

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  8. #8
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    The actual hip replacement metal is astonishingly expensive for humans and for dogs ie thousands per joint. And for humans - the replacement hip doesn't always last as long as the human - so a second replacement for the worn out replacements - can be required. At least we have medicare. There is no medicare for pets.

    When you think about what the hip joint does - and what a metal replacement has to do - ie completely non irritant, totally robust, totally corrosion proof, non toxic etc... I've got bits of metal in my knee - made out of titanium. At least that stuff is non magnetic so I can still have an mri if I need.

  9. #9

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    Keira,

    Zigby does swim but at thye beach this seems to be when he is the most stiff and limpy - I thougt it may be because of the water temprture - I never noticed this last summer but he was only a pup. Do you swim your dog in a hydra pool? And does your dog sit before she/he gets up? Zigby almost always sit first and then get's out of his bed even though it is quite high off the ground.

    Kate

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zigby View Post
    Keira,

    Zigby does swim but at thye beach this seems to be when he is the most stiff and limpy - I thougt it may be because of the water temprture - I never noticed this last summer but he was only a pup. Do you swim your dog in a hydra pool? And does your dog sit before she/he gets up? Zigby almost always sit first and then get's out of his bed even though it is quite high off the ground.

    Kate
    Beaches are probably not the best idea because the sand is really hard to walk on (I am sure you know this) and it is a lot higher impact on their joints to walk/run on it. I would avoid beaches for the most part, every now and then is ok but regularly probably not.
    I used to take her to a place nearby that has a pool specifically for swimming dogs but stopped doing that and started just swimming her in the next door neighbours pool as they didn't mind and it cost less and could be done more often.
    Not sure if you have access to a pool otherwise you might have to find somewhere like Kepala Country Club | Boarding Kennels Melbourne | Dog Kennels | Cattery | Pet Resort to take him swimming.

    When I think about it yes when she is laying on a tramp bed or a hessian bed she will often sit before getting off. Same from off the ground. I would say it is just easier than trying to get up into a stand with dodgy hips. I can usually tell if she is having a good or a bad day by how stiff her movement is, she is usually pretty good but some days (after walking/playing or maybe depending on the weather) she is obviously in more pain then others.

    If you are worried about pain and want to make him a little more comfortable on his bad days, Traumeel is good. It is an all natural, herbal anti-inflammatory and analgesic that can help give them relief. I believe it is about $25 for a bottle of 50 tablets, at his age and weight you could give him 1 tablet whenever he looks in pain, and you can redose every 3 hours if necessary. You can get Traumeel from health food stores (Mrs Flannery's) and pharmacies.

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