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Thread: TTA Surgery

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    12

    Default TTA Surgery

    Hi Everyone,

    I have been reading posts on this site for a while but never got around to joining (usual stuff... too busy).

    But my pride and joy Brock has done himself an injury - Torn Crucial Ligaments in his left hind leg - I feel so bad for the little fella. (yes I am kicking my self now for not getting that insurance cover!)

    I thought it would be good to share the experience and get any tips or advice from anyone who has already gone through this

    Brock is a 15 month English Staffy.

    I took him to our vet, who we have visited half a dozen times since we got Brock as a puppy at a breeders, unfortunately I found them to be heartless and not very open or ready to explain things as much as I needed to know. They basically said - surgery $1500 or whatevs.

    So off we went for a second opinion.

    I got recommended to another local vet by a work mate (not sure if I can say which vet) but they have been GREAT, really taking the time to explain things and also spell out each of the options clearly.

    At first we thought it might be a dodgy/dislocated knee cap (patella - cant remember many of the technical terms - sorry). After Xrays we confirmed it was Torn Crucial ligament and Brock also has very loose, sort of floating knee caps which dont help the issue.

    So after having a few options given to us we have gone with the TTA - where they insert a titanium plate and cuts bone and re- align everything. The Vet will also do a little extra to try and secure the knee cap and stop it from floating around so much.

    He is all booked in for Thursday next week (he will stay overnight at the Vet) - in the meantime he is a sooky lil fella but when he feels like it he still tries to chase the ducks in the front yard!

    I know the hardest thing is going to be the recovery and trying to keep him Inactive and Calm! I really have no idea how to achieve this!

    This is part of the reason we took the TTA option - it has the quickest recovery time for load bearing on the leg. The TTA procedure doesn't affect the load bearing part of the bone and from what I understand if he does put weight on it earlier than he should there is less chance of bad stuff.

    Well I think that's enough for now, I just got to concentrate on keeping him calm in the mean time and prepare myself for the first week after we pick him up, prepare a room for him to be 'caged in'.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    Geezz, thats not good at all. I feel sorry for him.
    I'd be looking at getting a crate for him. The vet will probably have him in one till he goes home with you. Good luck with it.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  3. #3

    Default

    So the floaty knee cap thing is called Luxatting Patella , my dog had this at 10 months and had surgery for this.

    The ligament that is torn is the Cruciate ligament

    I 2nd a crate as Sean has suggested, it will be MUCH easier to keep Brock quiet with a crate, having a whole room to himself will give him too much room to move around and possibly hurt himself, and trust me more often then not they do not realise the actually pain they are in because they are on painkillers and because of this they can easily over do it. Sadly unlike people, you can't tell a dog it needs to rest.

    Best of luck to you and Brock with the surgery

  4. #4

    Default

    Yep Im all for the crate too!

    Lilly is 8.5 weeks post op from her right knee being done and both her and Boof are booked in for the 28th Sept - Lilly's left leg and Boof's right!

    Lilly was able to weight bear the day after surgery, this was minimal obviously, enough to get her to the toilet and that was about it.

    As for the crate.... we got LOTS of different toys that could be used laying down (and have now just had to go and buy more to keep two occupied at the same time, LOL). Things like, water bottle covers so they can crunch them, little treat balls they can bat around while lying down, lots of HARD chewing treats like buffalo pizzles and cow hooves and deer antlers etc. We got them used to the crate before the big nasty operation, put their bed pillows in their and toys, sat in there with them and left the doors open so to start with they could wander in and out as they pleased, they now go in by choice even when they don't need to be in there.

    Good luck and ask as many questions as you need. Someone is always around to listen and help out
    Cheers Aleesha
    Lilly, OH & Boof ..... the 3 things that make life tick!

    All posts made under the name of "Shelby-001" are copywritten and may not be used in any publication or media without my prior written consent!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Hi All,

    Thanks for your pointers. I really appreciate it! And thanks for the correct names Keira & Phoenix I know I would get them wrong.

    I have never used a crate before and cause I know I'm up for some big costs I am keen so spend wisely.

    How big are crates?

    My partner and I were thinking of just setting up the laundry for him - its the coolest room in the house has a window for fresh air and its only about 3 x 2 meters (with the usual laundry sink and washer taking up some floor space) and hey if he gets used to it we might make it a permanent change instead of giving him run of the house were we are out!

    You should see my couch! the first 6 weeks we had him we could only spend the first two with him and he really took it out on my couch!

    The reason we are thinking the laundry is there is enough space to set up his potty and leave a meter or so of space for where we can put his bed. As much as I hate it I will have to work (my partner has 3 days off after the op and I have requested the next 4 off my work).

    The crates I have seen online seem too small - I know the Idea is to be small - but were will he poop and pee? Once we do go back to work he will be alone for 6hrs a day. I hate to think of it while he is still recovering but I have no choice (I'm gonna need to pay off the surgery).

    Do you think this size room would be ok? Can anyone tell me what size crates they use/ if they have a potty in it or what you think would be ideal?

  6. #6

    Default

    Crate rest means not moving... a 2x3m room still allows too much movement.
    It sounds cruel, but keeping him immobile is the best and fastest way to help him heal.

    Another member here (Di) tethered her girl to her coffee table which is a good idea, the dog was limited like it would be in a crate but without the confinement, of course that method requires constant supervision.

    You let the dog out to toilet, never encourage a dog to toilet where it sleeps. Slow on-lead walks to the backyard (with no stairs) every few hours is enough, then it's back in the crate.
    Crates should be large enough for the dog to stand up and turn around, no bigger.

    Keeping the dog occupied can be a challenge but there are plenty of great toys like kongs snd you can give bones to keep the boredom away.

  7. #7

    Default

    Jut to add to crested's post a 15 month old dog should well and truly be able to hold on for 6 hours, at times my girls (a 1 yo and a 4yo) have held on for 11 - 12 hours at a time whilst in the house. Your dog should not struggle with holding it for the 6 hours you are at work. Especially as by the time you both go back to work it will be more than 7 days after the op.

    You can get crates in lots of different sizes, best thing to do is to take him somewhere where they sell crates and find one which is big enough for him to stand up and turn around i but that is it. Once you have found the right size you can generally buy them online for much less than in a pet store.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    Ebay is your friend for crates, this blokes in Brisbane and had mine delivered in 2 days. Some have dividers so you can adjust the size.
    PET HOMES AND ACCESSORIES items - Get great deals on Dog Crates Tents, Guinea Pig Hutchs items on eBay Stores!


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    12

    Default Day of the TTA Surgery

    So today was the big day.

    Brock was doing well and as usual got all excited to go to the vet and see new people and smell new smells.

    I checked him in at 730am and got a call from the Vet at about 2pm to tell me the surgery was successful and went to plan. He is staying over night for observation and I will get a call in the morning to make a discharge appointment.

    The Vet was great and had a good long chat to me about everything and what to expect when I collect Brock tomorrow AND I even got a MMS with this photo and message....

    Brocky at the Vet TTA.jpg

    Hi Mum, I am feeling Great and have eaten some dinner. Missing you heaps but loving the cuddles from the pretty nurses. Love and Licks Brock

    Cheesy but I loved it!

    I discussed with the Vet the options regarding restricting Brock's activity and movement with the Vet and he is happy for a dog of Brocks size to be restricted to a room the size of our Laundry.

    We also discussed Brock's diet and because his activity will be greatly reduced he has advised us to ensure we adjust his food accordingly so that Brock doesn't put on too much weight.

    Feels very weird at Home with out the little fella.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    How on earth did I miss this thread.
    Jodi is now 6 weeks into her recovery. We see the vet tomorrow.
    The lead around the coffee table (a big heavy thing one of my sons made in yr 10 and it has had pride of place still (he is now 31)) works very well for us as she had never been in a crate and is pushing 2 years of age.

    I take her on a lead down a ramp that hubby built for her to toilet.

    At night she is tethered to the middle leg of our bed, her bed is there and she is as happy as a pig in mud.

    I didn't need to entertain her much, she had bones on a carpet runner, had some toys there.

    When we went out she was in the laundry.

    I have 3 other dogs and am very lucky we have the set up to cope with the needed changes.

    The last week or so one of the dogs was allowed in here with her (supervised).

    It is only the last few days I don't lead her out the back to pee
    and she has been off the tether in this end of the house.
    The only danger was her trying to jump on the couch if she wanted to. Newspapers spread over it deterred that one.

    It is very very important to adhere to instructions given.

    With Jodi's op for a luxating patella the rate of failure is 48%.
    I feel this is due to owners getting a bit cocky and the feeling of she'll be right.

    I say that cause it was happening with me and it was hard to still follow directions when she seemed fine.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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