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Thread: Hip Dysplasia

  1. #11
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    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Sorry to hear the diagnosis Lissa.........All the hope i can give you is that I am involved with a lot of Newfie people in the USA and it seems to bet the way (stemcell) a lot of them are going with good results. I also give my dogs all the preventatives or in your case assisting natural stuff. Such as cold fish oil, Vit C (very important for puppies) Glucosamine/chondroitin, sardines and kelp. If your dog is a puppy also check what he is eating. Lower the protein level. Go from puppy food to giant if you feed dry food. And even though people used to in the past do not feed added Calcium products, it seems to cause more problems. Get calcium naturally from meaty bones and sardines. We also keep our dogs on what some say is "the light side".......Lean and mean.

    Keep us up to date. Just remember that things have changed a lot and sometimes you need second or even third opinions, good luck
    Pets are forever

  2. #12
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    Mar 2010
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    Queensland
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    Lissa, one of my Neo pups had the entire ball knocked of the top of her hind led bone at only days of age, she was taken by a pretty wonderful person who sought expert advise, which was to have a radical operation to give her an artificial ball, she decided not to do that to her bcause of the cage thing and the cost and pain ect.

    She was told to expect the dog to be totally crippled at a very young age if she did not operate.

    That dog lived a long and natural life, she ran and played on a farm with other dogs, she jumped if she wanted to, she died at six years of age still only ever lame after a realy big day and fit as far as her bones went to the last.

    If you give your dog a good diet keep him lean and exersize sensibly he may not have as much of a problem as you expect, time to decide to operate when it must be done, not before.

    And remember that the muscles keep the bones in place, or as much in place as they can be, so fitness is very important, if muscles are slack his bones will fall apart much faster.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
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    My Gordon Setter was diagnosed with HD at about 6 months of age. I notified the breeder who was shocked, I had seen all the scores of her dogs including my dogs parents etc. In fact their results were proudly displayed in the puppy package.

    The breeder asked if her vet could see the Xrays and look at the bitch. We complied. While the hip wasn't great it wasn't all doom and gloom either. She had been a very fast growing bitch, despite the fact that during various teething stages she ate very little. Further examination showed a slight swelling of the bone just as it disappeared off the x-ray. Further X-rays showed that she had a bone infection in the leg and the pain was from that not the hip.

    She was treated for the bone infection and later Xrays where taken when she was 2.5yrs old. Her hips had improved from that big loose puppy.

    I'd seek further advice and wouldn't rush to make any decisions on such a young GR.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    When I busted my ACL, I tried for two years to get my knee back to normal without having a reconstruction. What a waste of time. Should have had recon straight away.

    But we had an aussie terrier who had her hip removed altogether when she was a puppy because it wasn't right, and she was fine without it, but I'm willing to bet she wasn't 30kg+

    So I agree with the others, make sure you get some other opinions, and options - ie "what esle can we do and what is the likely outcome for quality of life and cost of that (can we afford it, is it the best option now for long term etc).

    Given the dog is limping already - definitely want to investigate some what can we do right now possibilities. And rule out bone infection.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockingham, WA
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    15

    Default Decision Made

    It has been wonderful for all the knowledge and help you have passed on - thank you. My husband and I have decided NOT to have any surgery at present. Jasper is still growing - muscles and bones.

    In the future he will need surgery, but whilst he is a growing pup, happy, and not in pain; we are not going to cage him for a surgery, that will not rule out surgery in the future. We are going to 'Conservatively Manage' and let him enjoy his life for as long as he can.

    I have started him on Glucosamine, and with all the advice, have a shopping list to get!

    Many thanks and will keep you posted on the progress

  6. #16
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    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Jasper2011

    You should investigate crate training for your dog. It's not a doggy prison, it's more like "the teenagers retreat". Ie it should be a safe comfortable place for the dog to be, associated with lots of good things like food.

    My dog is very happy in her crate. She knows it means she can come with me more places and be safe.

    Post Op - it is really really important to restrict the dog's activity or any surgery to sort problems will be ruined. So the best idea is to train your dog to enjoy being in a crate from time to time - now.

    It's also very handy if you go on holidays or need to visit someone who doesn't allow dogs inside and doesn't have a dog proof garden. Eg visiting my ancient rellies - a crate and crate trained dog were invaluable.

    Susan Garrett has a great dvd on how to crate train a dog from scratch and fun games to play with the dog and the crate.
    Crate Games

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockingham, WA
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    15

    Default Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Jasper2011

    You should investigate crate training for your dog. It's not a doggy prison, it's more like "the teenagers retreat". Ie it should be a safe comfortable place for the dog to be, associated with lots of good things like food.

    My dog is very happy in her crate. She knows it means she can come with me more places and be safe.

    Post Op - it is really really important to restrict the dog's activity or any surgery to sort problems will be ruined. So the best idea is to train your dog to enjoy being in a crate from time to time - now.

    It's also very handy if you go on holidays or need to visit someone who doesn't allow dogs inside and doesn't have a dog proof garden. Eg visiting my ancient rellies - a crate and crate trained dog were invaluable.

    Susan Garrett has a great dvd on how to crate train a dog from scratch and fun games to play with the dog and the crate.
    Crate Games
    Thanks Hyacinth, our Vet has called and has fully supported our decision to not have surgery. We will concentrate on making Jasper happy and pain free for as long as we are able to. Started on Glucosamine and Chondroitin and Fish oil supplements. Many thanks to everyone for their support and advice on this post.

  8. #18
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    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Keep us updated, well wishes
    Pets are forever

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockingham, WA
    Posts
    15

    Default News

    Well... update

    The last 2 weeks have been heartbreaking. I know he is not dying or 'medically' sick, but I hate seeing him suffer. One day, he chased the cat - and sat there with ears back, resp rate high, and 'wild eyes'. Sign of pain, seen it in human patients. Another day, he could not put weight on his leg for about 7 hours.

    We have a 'consult' with an ortho vet on Monday, and TPO surgery is provionally booked for Tuesday. I have read and re-read articles on the TPO surgery, just wish I could talk to someone who has been through similar experience. Jasper is my 'baby', and I know if I had a baby, I would want a surgery that would give it a 90-95% chance of having a normal life, without getting arthitis at 2-3 years old, and not walking with a limp, or being unable to put weight on a limb just because he/she wanted to be 'normal'. God I DO NOT KNOW WHAT IS FOR THE BEST!!!! As an 'human' nurse, I know what I should do - he means everything to me!

  10. #20
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    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Ok I do know a GSD who has had the surgery bilaterally. And he is now in our Green classes at Obedience and doing Novice trials in Obedience. His Owner went to Werribee and had it all done. Bruce seems happy and is moving quite well. He does all the sit/drops in our trial runs without problems. He had surgery about two years ago and came back to Obedience about 6 months later. Hope his positive story helps you feel better. His only problem in Trials is his stays
    Pets are forever

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