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Thread: What Do You Think About Organic and Raw Food Diets? Are You Willing to Pay More?

  1. #1

    Default What Do You Think About Organic and Raw Food Diets? Are You Willing to Pay More?

    I would like to start a discussion about Raw food diets. Would you switch to such a diet? In which circumstances? Are you willing to pay extra money if it proves to improve your dog's health condition?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    You'll find that more people will engage in conversation with you if you state why you want this information. It is a rather 'interesting' first post to make without any introduction and gives off the impression (to me at any rate) that you are looking at selling something.

    My apologies if this is not the case.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  3. #3

    Default Organic vs. natural

    Are you familiar with the difference between organic and natural dog food? I personally have a problem with distinguishing it.. I do not have a dog now and the one that I did have, around 7 years ago, we used to feed him with table scrabbles (well, it was my grandparents' actually and they lived at the countryside) . I like pets, and dogs are my favourite among them, but I think that I would not treat a dog the way I am supposed to, given my haotic schedule and me studying in a foreign country, therefore, having a dog right now is kinda out of discussion..

    The reason I'm so interested in this topic is that is a requirement for my marketing exam, and I am hoping to find some kind people here who are willing to share their opinion about it. There are a lot of things I must understand in order to make a perspective.. for example, would you spend more money on healthier food if you'd own a smal-size breed?

    I am really looking forward to know a dog lovers' and owner's view on how important is to feed your dog with healthy food!

  4. #4

    Default Thanks for advice!

    .. I am not really trying to sell something, cause is more of a virtual case, but yes, it does have maybe more to do with school than searching for an answer for my own dog ( which i don't have anymore).

    But I am very keen on understanding it from your perspective, there are so many questions that cross my mind. And I've been reading a lot of posts lately on how much money are we willing to spend on our pets.. and I found some very interesting answers, and it got me thinking what I would do if I had a dog, or an ill one ..

    I have all the good intentions for these discussions and I appologize if I have offended you in any way. I must admit is the first time I start a thread on a forum, I might have done it the wrong way.. (well, except a thread about my admission to university, couple of years ago)

  5. #5
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    Aaah, that's better. Always happy to help a student. Good luck with your course.

    To be honest, I am not really entirely sure of the difference between organic and natural. I feed a mix of a raw diet and commercial food most of the time. I have never investigated organic foods for my pets.

    Your question about cost and small breed - yes. I already do this actually. I have 3 small breed dogs (all Pugs) and I will usually only buy premium brands of everything for them. I have often considered what I would do if my dogs were a larger breed.

    For example, one of them is on a specific prescription based diet from the Vet. Her kibble costs me around $68 for a 4.5 kilo bag. The other two I feed premium kibble and I purchased two 4 kilo bags yesterday for $36 each. Thankfully, they are small and so these bags last a while.

    I am in the lucky position where I can afford to spend alittle more than others would be able to.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Organic is certified and the property it grows on/comes from has been tested and certified.

    That said I grow vegetable of my own And I would say they are organic, because I do not use any chemicals and pesticides. But I have never had my soils tested for chemicals. There are some additives you can still use in an organic garden, you just have to be very strict about the source. E.g. you cannot use manures from animals that are actively wormed and such........It is quite involved and there are many books and websites on this. I am just a very active self sufficiency person

    Natural ( and with out preservatives when packed/prepared as some kibbles are now ) is grown without any chemicals or assistance, probably more like our orchards. We do not even prune and only use our fowl for insect reduction and rely on the wildlife and other insects too. And kangaroo would be natural grown meat. Some cattle /sheep are also just grown that way, only wormed about once a year (that is what we did in the NT)

    I feed my dogs mostly RAW..........We kill both our own and we have a great and generous Butcher (mostly for bones).......I cannot call this feeding organic, because the stock does not come from an organic source, our cattle are chemically wormed and such and so are the stock that come through our Butcher.
    I find RAW feeding much cheaper for my lot. I have three newfoundland and one larger cross Breed. Buying high quality kibble would cost a fortune.

    I will however use high quality kibble and some RAW, when we are travelling (showing/Obedience). Because it is too difficult to carry the volume of RAW my dogs eat.

    Added to the RAW meat my dogs also get rolled oats/barley, lupins (pea family) and lots of fruit and Vegetable from our garden/orchard.
    They are getting a huge amount of pumpkin at present, because we have so many of them, it is that time of the year.

    I see nothing wrong with good quality kibble/dry, but the cost is huge when you have large dogs.
    I do however avoid preservatives, both ourselves and for the dogs. That more then anything limits what my dogs eat.
    I also have a dog with wheat allergy, if it is made by factories/bakeries or such. Funnily enough if she eats our home made bread, she has no reactions. That is why I think it is more to do with all the preservatives we put in our foods.

    When I am low on RAW or at a friends place I will cook for my dogs, a combo of rice, soupmix (peas/barley/beans) rolled oats and some meat for taste. this is fine when they have it for a week or so and to them it is a treat, they love it.

    My reward/treats for training are microwaved lamb's fry....That is their all time favorite. It is rubbery and dry, but they love it.
    Last edited by newfsie; 06-22-2011 at 10:10 AM.
    Pets are forever

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
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    Hi,

    Brekky is mostly a mixture of kibbles (supercoat or nature's gift-supermarket brand) with yogurt, or tinned fish with rolled oats, or table scraps.
    Dinner is raw varying from lamb to small whole fish, which I purchase from a wholesale butcher and a fish market. I am not too careful with food but try to feed my dogs high in protein and low in fat.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  8. #8

    Default

    there are quite a lot of threads about raw and BARF already- have you scrolled through and had a look. Some of your questions may well be answered already.

    we feed BARF- roo tail/mince with organ meat/lamb off cuts, bones, chook necks, eggs, tinned sardines etc. Frozen BARF patties 4 times a week. Occasional kibble is eaglepac.

    As a family we try to eat certified organic food if its within our budget. We have our own veggies/fruit trees and chooks for eggs also. I do believe that organic food contains a better and more natural nutrient mix.
    I prob would not spend any more than we already do on dog food- I think Roscoe has a good diet.

    If a person was feeding 100% kibble based diet then organic or not might make a big difference.
    Last edited by sweetboy; 06-22-2011 at 12:10 PM.

  9. #9
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    Oct 2010
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    Adelaide
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    We have a large dog (mastiff x ridgeback x dane), a medium dog (a thick set red heeler), and a medium-small dog (staffy x). We feed them a mixture of Nutro's kibble and fresh mince (mostly roo) from the local fresh pet food store. The large bags of Nutro cost around $120 and lasts us around 3 weeks and a kilo of roo mince costs $4 and lasts us 3 or 4 days.

    We've chosen to feed some raw because it's the closest to what dogs would have naturally eaten in the wild. Therefore it should be easier on a dog's digestive system and there aren't any unnatural fillers that could potentially cause problems down the track. I have fed BARF patties in the past, but find that the fresh raw meat is cheaper. I read that the sausage roll shaped dog food that you can get in the refrigerated aisle at the grocery store can cause cancer, I don't remember where I read that though ... so we certainly stay away from things like that. We chose Nutro kibble firstly because a breeder recommended it, but secondly it has very few grains and fillers. Finally, Nutro (along with other high quality kibble) has vitamins and minerals that our dogs might miss out on if we fed strictly raw.

    Dogs don't need grains or vegetables because they are carnivores, so I go out of my way to try to keep their diet as nutritious and natural as possible. There's a cat food commercial that irritates me because it's showing all the veggies in the tin of wet food ... which cats don't need either because they're also carnivores. I think a lot of pet food marketing is aimed at making the pet owners feel like they're giving a nutritious meal (most humans see veggies as a good thing) even if it's not the best thing for the animal.

    I would only switch to completely raw if our vet suggested it and explained why he was suggesting it. Good luck with your project!

  10. #10
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    May 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glitter009 View Post
    We have a large dog (mastiff x ridgeback x dane), a medium dog (a thick set red heeler), and a medium-small dog (staffy x). We feed them a mixture of Nutro's kibble and fresh mince (mostly roo) from the local fresh pet food store. The large bags of Nutro cost around $120 and lasts us around 3 weeks and a kilo of roo mince costs $4 and lasts us 3 or 4 days.

    We've chosen to feed some raw because it's the closest to what dogs would have naturally eaten in the wild. Therefore it should be easier on a dog's digestive system and there aren't any unnatural fillers that could potentially cause problems down the track. I have fed BARF patties in the past, but find that the fresh raw meat is cheaper. I read that the sausage roll shaped dog food that you can get in the refrigerated aisle at the grocery store can cause cancer, I don't remember where I read that though ... so we certainly stay away from things like that. We chose Nutro kibble firstly because a breeder recommended it, but secondly it has very few grains and fillers. Finally, Nutro (along with other high quality kibble) has vitamins and minerals that our dogs might miss out on if we fed strictly raw.

    Dogs don't need grains or vegetables because they are carnivores, so I go out of my way to try to keep their diet as nutritious and natural as possible. There's a cat food commercial that irritates me because it's showing all the veggies in the tin of wet food ... which cats don't need either because they're also carnivores. I think a lot of pet food marketing is aimed at making the pet owners feel like they're giving a nutritious meal (most humans see veggies as a good thing) even if it's not the best thing for the animal.

    I would only switch to completely raw if our vet suggested it and explained why he was suggesting it. Good luck with your project!
    Actually, they're not. Canines are an omnivore, as we are.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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