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Thread: Wolfing of Lamb Rib Bones by Puppy... OK or Not?!

  1. #31
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    10 weeks and 7kg? My dog was 5kg at the same age - so I'm guessing yours is going to be BIG.

    So I don't know any rules about age and what kind of bones. I think my vet recommended chicken wings and cutting them up if the dog hoovered them. Then again chicken wing also came back to haunt us. I think if I froze it first it would take her longer to eat it, and she'd chew bits off it instead of trying to swallow it whole as soon as she could - I swear she was a sea lion in a previous life.

    Lamb necks was what she vomitted last time. What you have to watch out for is the hoovering. Could your dog hoover a lamb neck?

    Not sure about buying bones from a pet store. It's nice they have helpful advice but - apart from dry dog food, I get everything I give to my dog from the same place I buy food. It's got to go in my fridge too so I don't want the different food handling standards in my kitchen.

    However my family got into the most trouble with something called "chicken mince" for pets which was actually minced carcass - bones and all ie not suitable for cooking - we didn't know that and dog got very sick. And that was from a butcher. Bad butcher. He's gone now.

    I don't tell butchers when I'm buying for the dog. Bones are for soup or osso bucco or roast. Stuff the dog, I love roast lamb neck bones, she's getting none. Mince is for bolognese or hamburgers. Right? And if I get 1.2 kg instead of 1kg - then that .2 is for bolognese. And I don't have to feel worried it's not good enough for me to eat.

    Actually a lot of people at dog park ask me from time to time if I feed my dog left overs and I say - mostly no - because I never have any left overs - I eat it all. Sometimes there is the chewy bit from a steak and I chop that up for treats. And that's as close as she gets.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    10 weeks and 7kg? My dog was 5kg at the same age - so I'm guessing yours is going to be BIG.
    Oh no, that's just what we've been thinking! She's actually 7.5kg at 10 weeks, and that's with her being slightly on the leaner side rather than pudgy. Her parents* were only medium-sized dogs, or maybe just a fraction bigger, but she's been growing like a weed. That's why I want to make sure she has good nutrition to support those long bones.

    (*She's a mixture, with a lot of Golden Retriever influence visible.)
    Who's Ya Doggy? Dog Breed Guide. The best on the internet!
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  3. #33

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    Yes she will be large & I have found golden x's to often be bigger than either parent. Yes being a dog thats going to be on the larger side I would be looking after her bones.
    There has been some debate of late that diets too high in calicum & fat are not good for young large breed dogs joints.
    I always advise a high quality dry complete food for growing dogs & then you know they are getting all they need. I also offer different bones & treats but more as tooth cleaning aids & for enviromental enrichment than as a food supplement so to speak.

  4. #34

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    Yes, it's hard to know, isn't it? I have been hedging - a good dry mix (but with some inevitable grains) plus raw meat.

    The calcium/nutrition issue strikes me as odd - generally a youngster will grow however it's going to grow (no?), so restricting good quality nutrition (protein, fat, calcium) seems like the opposite of what would bode well for fast-growing bones. But there may be science that I don't know...
    Who's Ya Doggy? Dog Breed Guide. The best on the internet!
    http://dogbreedguide.whosyadoggy.com

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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finley View Post
    OK, my other half just went to the pet store for some chicken necks...

    Yes, they had them, but the lady there was emphatic about not giving them to puppies before 14 weeks of age. I cannot imagine what age has to do with it - size, yes, but age?

    She highly recommended lamb necks instead. Your thoughts?

    Ta
    If it was my puppy, i would go for the lamb necks out of those two. I always think larger is better, they will nibble/chew on it for a long time.........But for our pups we use beef brisket, which are large and soft, never splinter. All our pups get those.
    Pets are forever

  6. #36

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    A good butcher will sell good bones for dogs. And a good ground chicken carcass is really good. A good butcher isn't going to risk his business selling the wrong type of bones or dodgy meat. I prefer to buy from a butcher than from pet store that sells pet mince with a dye in it or no idea what the meat is.
    Knowledgeable breeders often introduce chicken necks from 3-4 weeks.
    I'm a Dr Billinghurst fan and can recommend his book Give a Dog a Bone. Whether you want to feed raw / bones or not it explains how raw benefits your dog. I use it as a reference book. I don't follow it 100% but I have a better understanding of dog nutrition.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finley View Post
    Yes, it's hard to know, isn't it? I have been hedging - a good dry mix (but with some inevitable grains) plus raw meat.

    The calcium/nutrition issue strikes me as odd - generally a youngster will grow however it's going to grow (no?), so restricting good quality nutrition (protein, fat, calcium) seems like the opposite of what would bode well for fast-growing bones. But there may be science that I don't know...
    Large Breed Puppy Food Skeptvet.com
    Here's a article I found interesting on the matter.
    Really the problem is some poeple where feeding large breed adolesents too well & they where growing too fast & therefore their joints & ligements can't handle the strain.
    Really it's all about commen sence really, keep the dog in a good weight range, don't do too much jarring activities till full grown. I go more by my dogs attidudes, coats & waistlines than anything else as far as what feeds work best for us.

  8. #38

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    Oh & grains arn't always the bad guys, it depends on the percentage & which grain for me. My dogs used to go well on rice based feeds with other supps.

  9. #39
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    Finley

    OMG. I hope you train her lots - GR are easy to train. Mostly you want a dog when it's huge to be ultra polite ie no jumping and slobbering all over people uninvited or playing tug with somebody else's lead when they're trying to go home. So start when they're little.

    Frosty has maxed out around the 22 - 23kg mark, she was playing with a young GR pup at the park today and it was already bigger than her. Not that this bothers a dog born to wrestle with cattle. But the owners were already teaching it to pull on lead (they kept walking when it was pulling instead of stopping until it corrected itself etc). Sigh.

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