Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 50

Thread: Weird Spots...... Proving a Mystery!

  1. #21

    Default

    It is not always possible to positively identify dermatophyte infections on physical examination and Wood' lamp examination alone. Only approximately 50% of Microsporum canis infections will fluoresce under UV light. Positive identification is best done via implantation in culture media and this is easily done in a clinic setting - the downside is the 7-14 day wait for a result, so treatment is usually started on a presumptive basis and modified once results are actually known. Direct microscopy using KOH is highly user dependent and therefore considered less reliable.

    Wash the dog in Malaseb or if it is sensitive then try Nizoral anti-fungal shampoo.

    Most importantly hygiene. Don't let him wonder around everywhere, wash bedding and dog beds, it's probably too late now but you should wear gloves when handling/treating.
    It will take many many weeks.

    Soak the bedding in bleach,wash with canestane in wash liquid, Dry in the sun.
    Canestane wash is expensive but good.
    There will be lots of different opinions on how to clean and treat. These are just a couple more.

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I think it takes a couple of weeks to be sure the ringworm is on the way out, maybe longer. It's not an instant thing. In the meantime - cleaning up all the sores, checking everybody else for sores (and washing hands very carefully before and after each check), and cleaning up the environment. (Can you shoot the cat or possum?).

    And that's if there is no re-infection somewhere (which is what happen to my friend's family in their feral environment).

    It's possible the sores wouldn't be itchy anyway, but the antihistamine/steroid would also reduce the itchiness. Antibiotic (so long as it targets the right bacteria) should also help, though I'd be inclined to add a topical one as well. Honey has antiseptic properties. Apparently - so does ear wax. Aloe vera - goo from the cut leaf may have some antiseptic properties - google is a bit wishy washy on that, but I know heaps of people and myself that have used it. Stops dog licking too cos it's really bitter.
    Yeah my anitfungal cream says treat for 2-4 weeks until spots have cleared and then continue to treat for 2 weeks after the spots are gone, so I'd say you are right with the time frame.

    I have Manuka Honey so I will put that on as well (hopefully she doesn't lick it all off him, LOL) will do it as we are heading out for a walk so it has time to soak in before any possibility of it coming off.

    Mum's got some aloe vera plants so I might go grab some of them, if it's bitter it will stop Lilly wanting to lick it, unlike the inviting honey.

    They were both very good while they had their wash this morning.

  3. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by molly33 View Post
    It is not always possible to positively identify dermatophyte infections on physical examination and Wood' lamp examination alone. Only approximately 50% of Microsporum canis infections will fluoresce under UV light. Positive identification is best done via implantation in culture media and this is easily done in a clinic setting - the downside is the 7-14 day wait for a result, so treatment is usually started on a presumptive basis and modified once results are actually known. Direct microscopy using KOH is highly user dependent and therefore considered less reliable.

    Wash the dog in Malaseb or if it is sensitive then try Nizoral anti-fungal shampoo.

    Most importantly hygiene. Don't let him wonder around everywhere, wash bedding and dog beds, it's probably too late now but you should wear gloves when handling/treating.
    It will take many many weeks.

    Soak the bedding in bleach,wash with canestane in wash liquid, Dry in the sun.
    Canestane wash is expensive but good.
    There will be lots of different opinions on how to clean and treat. These are just a couple more.
    Molly that's why they want to do a skin biopsy as they aren't convinced from the examinations that it's ringworm. Given he is going under for his neutering on the 25th of this month, they have decided unless it starts adversley affecting him it can wait til then.

    In the meantime, it is Malesab that I bought to wash them with.

    I have sprayed a dilute bleach solution on their beds (they have metal frame beds with the plasticy mesh slings in them so nothing to wash there, no pillows, no towels/blankets etc.

    The towels I use to dry them are being washed as I type in a 'medic' cycle which washes at 95 degress for and hour!

    I have removed their material collars and sprayed with dilute bleach solution, they are sunning on the clothes line. I have also sprayed the outdoor mats with the dilute bleach and popped them in the sun as well. Well what there is of sun, it's a bit overcast here today.

    Our bedding has been washed and I have bathed in a medicated wash and moisturised with a tea tree medicated moisturiser. So hopefully taken as much precaution as possible.

    Must say I am naughty though and haven't put gloves on, I do make a point of immediately washing my hands now I know they could be ringworm.

    If he in anyway becomes affected by them ie: is turned off food, not interested in playing, lazier than normal or anything abnormal, I'll take him to get the biopsy done sooner, but while they aren't I'll hold off for the one visit.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Hi Shelby

    Hopefully the sores will start to get smaller over the next 10 days or so. And ringworm is not usually life threatening, just really ugly and irritating.

    So I think you're doing all the right things now.

    You can probably get a piece of your mum's aloe vera to grow. It keeps fairly well in the fridge too, So I cut a slice off the leaf about an inch or so long and then split that in half and wipe on the sore, though it might be good to have a separate piece for each sore or dog.

    A node of the original aloe plant should grow if you stick the bottom of it in moist dirt, and then only water when the dirt has dried out. Too wet is not good, but it copes fairly well with dry. Ie its the kind of plant that forgives you if you forget to water it. And it doesn't mind a bit of shade. Eg afternoon shade is good.

    Ringworm is more likely to get going where the skin was already weak or damaged in some way, but if all is healthy - it's probably harder to catch. Here's hoping. I get itchy just thinking about it.

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shelby-001 View Post
    Molly that's why they want to do a skin biopsy as they aren't convinced from the examinations that it's ringworm. Given he is going under for his neutering on the 25th of this month, they have decided unless it starts adversley affecting him it can wait til then.

    In the meantime, it is Malesab that I bought to wash them with.

    I have sprayed a dilute bleach solution on their beds (they have metal frame beds with the plasticy mesh slings in them so nothing to wash there, no pillows, no towels/blankets etc.

    The towels I use to dry them are being washed as I type in a 'medic' cycle which washes at 95 degress for and hour!

    I have removed their material collars and sprayed with dilute bleach solution, they are sunning on the clothes line. I have also sprayed the outdoor mats with the dilute bleach and popped them in the sun as well. Well what there is of sun, it's a bit overcast here today.

    Our bedding has been washed and I have bathed in a medicated wash and moisturised with a tea tree medicated moisturiser. So hopefully taken as much precaution as possible.

    Must say I am naughty though and haven't put gloves on, I do make a point of immediately washing my hands now I know they could be ringworm.

    If he in anyway becomes affected by them ie: is turned off food, not interested in playing, lazier than normal or anything abnormal, I'll take him to get the biopsy done sooner, but while they aren't I'll hold off for the one visit.

    Sounds good.

  6. #26

    Default

    Oh Hyacinth I know, it's like talking about Nits, you're instantly itchy all over, LOL.

    Yep I think I will, we always had an Aloe Vera plant or 3 growing when I was a kid, so I think it's time to put some in my garden. We have the perfect spot down the 'services' side of the house (narrow side with all the a/c units and hot water etc).

    Yeah from what I've read if you keep clean and don't have any abrasions it's not likely to spread, but if you live in a not so clean environment, have skin abrasions already etc it spreads a lot easier.

    Fingers crossed Lilly stays clear and so do the rest of us.

    Interestingly though, I was just talking to a lady that works in the same complex as our shop, she has Great Danes and one of her boys gets the exact same spots. I brought Boof down to show her and yep, she says they are identical. Her other Dane doesn't ever get them though, just him. She has already done the skin biopsy thing and they can't find a cause for them, weird huh?!? She has asked if I get to the bottom of them to let her know my solution, she can get her vet to look into it then. (She uses a vet in the next town, 35km away)

    So now it's a time game, only in time will we know what happens with them and possibly what they are.

  7. #27

    Default

    The other thing is too that ringworm can look different on different dogs with different coats. I volunteer at a shelter and have seen my fair share of ringworm. So unless it's confirmed one way or another treat as if it were, as you are. But I would not recommend taking him for walks. Usually you should quarantine, and that's not from a shelter point of view.
    And remember too ringworm doesn't necessarily appear on skin which has not been in direct contact such as the lower back.
    I am so paranoid about zoonotic diseases and touch wood hope I never get one.
    Last edited by molly33; 10-13-2010 at 05:44 PM. Reason: spelling

  8. #28

    Default

    Hey Molly,

    You had me intrigued with Zoonotic diseases, I had to google that one.

    By this:

    And remember too ringworm doesn't necessarily appear on skin which has not been in direct contact such as the lower back.

    do you mean it can appear on the lower back despite it not coming into direct contact with a ring worm, or did you really mean it isn't likely to appear somewhere that hasn't come into contact. Sorry just a lil confused, as I thought it could appear anywhere.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shelby-001 View Post
    Hey Molly,

    You had me intrigued with Zoonotic diseases, I had to google that one.

    By this:

    And remember too ringworm doesn't necessarily appear on skin which has not been in direct contact such as the lower back.

    do you mean it can appear on the lower back despite it not coming into direct contact with a ring worm, or did you really mean it isn't likely to appear somewhere that hasn't come into contact. Sorry just a lil confused, as I thought it could appear anywhere.
    Yes ring worm can appear on any where without direct contact. I experienced on my lower back ages ago from a cat I came across one day.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  10. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hachna View Post
    Yes ring worm can appear on any where without direct contact. I experienced on my lower back ages ago from a cat I came across one day.
    That's what I thought, thanks Hachna!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •