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Thread: Advise on Epilepsy Please

  1. #41
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    It just clicked that Bella is your staffy, I can't recall staffs being a breed prone to epilepsy, hopefully it's just one of those random things, but yes best to be aware of it.

    Did you sort out the assessment of the Pei at Liverpool?

    In My Home Dog Minding
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreysAreGreat View Post
    It just clicked that Bella is your staffy, I can't recall staffs being a breed prone to epilepsy, hopefully it's just one of those random things, but yes best to be aware of it.

    Did you sort out the assessment of the Pei at Liverpool?
    Actually not sure about the pei in Liverpool. I left it in the hands of Peipod and Mouse and Chicken. I am sure between them they will have it all in hand. Thanks!
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  3. #43
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    Poor darling Bella...I hope she gets well soon...sending her special staffy cuddles from Sumo and Ruby

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shar Pei Rescue Victoria View Post
    Bella had 2 x siezures this morning. Blood work OK, valium in my bathroom cabinet. Any thoughts? She is 4 in April
    She is probably too old to show signs of L2-HGA...has she been tested?

    L2-Hga

    L-2-HGA (L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria) in Staffordshire Bull Terriers is a neurometabolic disorder characterised by elevated levels of L-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in urine, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.
    L-2-HGA affects the central nervous system, with clinical signs usually apparent between 6 months and one year (although they can appear later). Symptoms include epileptic seizures, "wobbly" gait, tremors, muscle stiffness as a result of exercise or excitement and altered behaviour.
    The mutation, or change to the structure of the gene, probably occurred spontaneously in a single dog but once in the population has been inherited from generation to generation like any other gene. The disorder shows an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance: two copies of the defective gene (one inherited from each parent) have to be present for a dog to be affected by the disease. Individuals with one copy of the defective gene and one copy of the normal gene - called carriers - show no symptoms but can pass the defective gene onto their offspring. When two apparently healthy carriers are crossed, 25% (on average) of the offspring will be affected by the disease, 25% will be clear and the remaining 50% will themselves be carriers.
    The mutation responsible for the disease has recently been identified at the Animal Health Trust. Using the information from this research, we have developed a DNA test for the disease. This test not only diagnoses dogs affected with this disease but can also detect those dogs which are carriers, displaying no symptoms of the disease but able to produce affected pups. Carriers could not be detected by the tests previously available which involved either a blood or urine test detecting elevated levels of L-2-hydroxyglutarate or magnetic resonance imaging. Under most circumstances, there will be a much greater number of carriers than affected animals in a population. It is important to eliminate such carriers from a breeding population since they represent a hidden reservoir of the disease that can produce affected dogs at any time.
    The test is available now and information on submitting samples is given below.
    Breeders will be sent results identifying their dog as belonging to one of three categories:

    • CLEAR: the dog has 2 copies of the normal gene and will neither develop L-2-HGA, nor pass a copy of the L-2-HGA gene to any of its offspring.
    • CARRIER: the dog has one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutant gene that causes L-2-HGA. It will not develop L-2-HGA but will pass on the L-2-HGA gene to 50% (on average) of its offspring.
    • AFFECTED: the dog has two copies of the L-2-HGA mutation and is affected with L-2-HGA. It will develop L-2-HGA at some stage during its lifetime, assuming it lives to an appropriate age.

    Carriers can still be bred to clear dogs. On average, 50% of such a litter will be clear and 50% carriers; there can be no affected produced from such a mating. Pups which will be used for breeding can themselves be DNA tested to determine whether they are clear or carrier.

  5. #45
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    Clea, thanks for this. Interesting. I wonder if HGB on her blood test is the portion I am supposed to be looking at, as it is right on the border of normal and elevated. In any case I will be armed and very danerous when I see our usual vet next week. Madam has been resting quietly since Friday and I am doing my best to keep her quiet. Funny how things work out, I was so delighted for her to have 5 acres to run around on so soon, but now I am freaking out about that a bit given I want her to stay quiet and close by me.
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  6. #46
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    Shar, don't worry about the room she'll have to run around, it won't affect what is happening with her (if anything is). I moved from 380sqm to 25 acres and it didn't make any difference to my girl's fits, if anything I think it helped that she had lots of room to potter and the fresh air to breathe. I know sometimes stress brought on fits, but that was the minority, she had a fairly stress-free life with me. With her I realised that I had no control over her fitting except for meds, acreage living won't affect it.

    In My Home Dog Minding
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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreysAreGreat View Post
    Shar, don't worry about the room she'll have to run around, it won't affect what is happening with her (if anything is). I moved from 380sqm to 25 acres and it didn't make any difference to my girl's fits, if anything I think it helped that she had lots of room to potter and the fresh air to breathe. I know sometimes stress brought on fits, but that was the minority, she had a fairly stress-free life with me. With her I realised that I had no control over her fitting except for meds, acreage living won't affect it.
    Very practical GAG!!! I am just being an overly apprehensive freakazoid I 'spose. As you can imagine she hasn't been out of our sight since Friday, so I am pleased to read that I can relax a bit more. You are right given the circumstances of Friday. there was no stress, no flashing lights, no nothing. It just happened with no prelude.

    I spend heaps of time and money at the vet, I would do anything I could for a rescue, but Bella, OMG I would sell my soul to the devil to keep her healthy. And if the truth be known, I am somewhat paronoid atm given the personal tragedies of the last fortnight. So thanks for taking the time to let me know I should relax about the acreage. Much appreciated
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  8. #48
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    Hi Amanda

    I want you to read this...I know at the end he is trying to sell his book, but read what this guy has to say about Phytate/Phytic acid, which is found in Corn, wheat and Soy used in dog foods. Read it all...it is quite interesting.

    I am just trying to give you some info, so you can ask the Vet maybe to take a vitamin/mineral test on Bella to see if she is suffering from deficiencies.

    Canine Seizures Breakthroughs

    Here is another really good website:

    The Role of a Healthy Natural Diet in the Management of Canine Epilepsy

    Part taken from that website:

    Grains have high phytate content which impairs mineral absorption (particularly relevent since magnesium, zinc, calcium and other mineral deficiencies are linked to seizures).
    4. For canines, it is well documented that three of the most common food allergens are wheat, corn and soy, primary ingredients in many commercial dog foods. (Allergies are a cause of some seizures.)
    5. In human epileptics, it is believed that the grains high in gluten content (like wheat, rye, oats) stimulate opiod receptors in the brain, making them more susceptible to seizures. Although grains further "removed" from wheat (like corn and rice) are allowed in gluten free diets, the other issues listed here concerning grains in the diet would still exist.
    6. Complex carbohydrates found in grains quickly turn to sugar in the body. (Since a dog's metabolism is considerably faster than ours, this might in turn mean that a quicker crash from a sugar "high" would occur. Hypoglycemia is another cause of some seizures.)
    7. Unsupplemented canine diets of commercial foods high in cereal (grains) and vegetable proteins are likely to be deficient in amino acids. Taurine is the building block of all of the amino acids. (Deficiencies in taurine are linked to seizures and epilepsy.) Cereal grains are also low in Essential Fatty Acids, important for neurological function.
    Last edited by Cleasanta; 01-27-2010 at 06:54 AM.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    Thanks Cleasanta, that was what was on DOL that I spoke of.
    I don't go on DOL very often (have been there twice I think)...I found the websites searching for canine epilepsy etc

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    You don't know what you're missing with DOL. There's loads more people to annoy you, argue with you, laugh at you and with you, cry with you and generally drive you insane.
    wow...I would have a field day there MUHAHAHAHA

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