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Thread: Freezing Raw Meat Before Feeding to Dogs

  1. #11
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    I've actually been shown Hydatids - the last time our vet showed us some he'd collected via his work - as part of puppy pre-school and why you worm your dog.

    They're more commonly known as tape worms in Australia and people and dogs can get them. And some very deluded people have been known to take them as a "weight loss aid" - fine if they lodge in the gut but they tend not to discriminate and will quite happily lodge anywhere in the body including the brain which really messes with a person's ability to think clearly.

    Given that none of our cities are entirely wildlife free - or even sheep free (seen those big transport trucks full of them? And people like to buy sheep manure for their gardens... there is the potential for Hydatids anywhere. Foxes also carry Hydatids and they live right through Australian urban areas.

  2. #12
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    Hydatids-Key text

    Oh no... I'd better inform the person who gave me this information! I now am terrified... Pepsi and Mimi had lamb kidneys a couple of days ago!!!!! ..

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Anne

    Based on info off the 'net (mostly uni or government sites) it looks like neosporosis canineum (NC) is a protozoa not a bacteria. Some protozoa actually eat bacteria. And NC can and does infect dogs. Usually farm dogs that get to eat bits of calf foetus or afterbirth from an infected cow/calf. And the cows get it from eating pasture containing infected dog poo or from their infected mothers. Hydatids - which are a (tape) worm - also get circulated this way.

    So if your meat has NC, there's a good chance it has Hydatids too. . I like my beef steak rare. But I can understand why some of my farming cousins like it well done.

    And yes some dogs have cast iron guts and some dogs have sensitive stomachs, some dogs can carry disease with no symptoms and other dogs die. Darwin would call that natural selection in favour of the dogs with cast iron guts. However generations of city life, hygienically prepared food, and good vet treatment may have altered the natural selection based on cast iron guts somewhat.

    Personally I hope they get the vaccination working and available for dogs as well as cattle ASAP. In the meantime - no raw beef for me or my dog. I do freeze the marrow bones. I know my freezer is more than -18'C (good for icecream). I think maybe it's -24'C will have to check again with the indoor/outdoor thermometer.
    Thanks, I am still quite comforatble with feeding my dogs raw meat and will continue to do so.

    In my 43 years of life, I have never had a dog becomes seriously ill due to the feeding of raw meat nor have I ever known a human to become seriously ill through raw meat unless it was due to poor handling practices or hygiene.

    Given the above, I feel the chance of me or my dogs being infected by NC or hytadids is extremely slim and I would have more chance of being seriously injured in my car than by my eating habits..... and I don't plan on giving up driving anytime soon either.

    I still don't believe we are at risk obviously and until I see evidence and research it I will remain thinking this way. Feel free to provide references and links to where you are sourcing your information from though (the mostly uni or government sites). I can only learn more and I enjoy learning.

    We can be ruled by irrational fears or we can be complacent. I like to think I am neither. The internet though is causing so many people to feed their dogs diets that are not nutritionally balanced and this little fear will be just another in a long line of fear and guilt based things that people will read on the net.

    Dogs are wild animals. They regurgitate and eat their vomit and others. They eat feaces. The bury raw bones and meat and dig them up and eat them later. They eat dirt, bugs and grubs. They lick infected sores, they eat dead animals covered in maggots. I can't see how raw meat, fit for human consumption or pet consumption can hurt them.

    Perhaps I am over simplifying things though??
    Last edited by Anne; 10-12-2009 at 09:45 AM.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  4. #14

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    Same here Anne..

    I feed Floyd HC grade raw meats only. No pet mince for my dogs, goodness only knows whats in them.

    I honestly cant see "human consumption" grade meats containing parasites etc.

  5. #15
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    I did not suggest people stop feeding their dogs raw meat, just to take the precaution of freezing the meat first. Not a big deal and the nutritional content after freezing is not so different. Better than cooking the meat.
    The best things in life, aren't things

  6. #16
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    It's good to be informed but one should always keep an open mind and not panic unnecessarily.

    Meat inspection in Australia is of a very high standard. Meat sold in the UK comes from all over Europe, including countries with minimal standards. You are pretty safe with human consumption meat. I have no hesitation in feeding even raw offal to my dogs provided it comes from a butcher and not a pet store.

    Does anyone remember the dogs who died after eating contaminated tinned food here in Australia? It was a few years ago and there was a lot of hoo ha about covering up the name of the company involved. There have been many cases of contaminated dry food, especially in the USA. In one case hundreds of dogs died or were seriously ill. More recently dogs died after eating doggy treats sold here in supermarkets.

    I buy in bulk so I freeze most of my meat any way but certainly the day I buy it I feed unfrozen. I'll continue to do the same thing and hope for the best.

  7. #17
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    Hi Anne

    I agree with you. Chances of getting hydatids or NC from raw meat sold at a city butcher are tiny. I think there is more chance of being in a car accident.

    I was mostly arguing the technical point about protozoa vs bacteria and/or the suggestion that dogs won't get tummy problems from dodgy food. Unfortunately for me, my puppy dog frequently gets tummy problems from eating things she shouldn't. Fortunately for me, I've managed to stop her from eating several dead birds that have appeared on our local football ovals. But I couldn't stop her from eating large amounts of dynamic lifter, or the occasional abandoned hotdog sausage. As soon as I notice these kinds of things I put her back on lead and keep her on lead at those places until the contamination has gone.

    As for our food supply being safe - it mostly is but every now and again it isn't. But it's not usually raw beef that is the problem. Lately it's been metwurst, orange juice, vietnamese cold rolls and airline food.

  8. #18

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    This is a good thread. So... is the bottom line

    1. The germy thing does exist

    2. It may cause a problem, but probably won't

    3. Freezing will kill it if you are worried about it, but you probably shouldn't worry about it.

    4. Dogs eat way worse things than raw or frozen raw meat, and would eat more yucky things if they could get away with it.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by puggerup View Post
    ermm worming treatments cover tape worm LOL so just treat them and don't stress.
    There are a number of different types of tapeworm. Not all worming products cover the hydatid tapeworm. It pays to always read the info on the packet, especially with the cheap supermarket brands.

    Hydatids was much more common when farmers slaughtered their own sheep for home consumption. Slaughter the sheep and thrown the offal still warm to the dogs. No meat inspection. Certainly when I was a child we were made to wash our hands very thoroughly after touching farm dogs.

    At one time regular worming for hydatid tapeworm was compulsory in NZ and also in some parts of Australia.

    With regular worming of dogs and good personal hygiene there is now very little chance of people catching hydatids.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by puggerup View Post
    I agree. Vet worming treatment is the best.. I use drops that cover worms, including heart worm (now) and fleas, but I need to make sure they cover hydatids too.
    I might look into the drops Puggerup. What brand are they and do they have Ivermectin in them? Can't use any product containing Ivermectin with Kenna Sheltie of course. I use Interceptor but the chewables are useless as Kenna and Strada are both fuss pots and tell me they taste foul and are not nice treaties at all.

    Interceptor covers hydatid tapeworm but they use the silly scientific name Echinococcus granulosus. Had to do a google on that one.

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