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Thread: Doggy Diarrhoea

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Default Doggy Diarrhoea

    I know - not the most nicest subjects! But I had to ask!

    Buddy is recovering from kennel cough, has still been eating OK (dried food etc) but the last couple of nights / mornings he's had very bad diarrhoea.. I'm presuming that this would be normal as humans get this as well, but he hasn't been eating anything different for this to happen. Would it perhaps just because he's unwell? Is there anything that I should be giving him to help with this little problem?

    Also, SCRATCHING. Anyone tried lemon myrtle soap for dogs? Buddy has crazy skin issues, not mites, vet said that is just allergies in general and that he would need to see a specialist for ongoing tests to elliminate everything. We've tried different foods, different shampoos (currently using Alloveen) but I saw lemon myrtle soap for dogs the other day (apparently supposed to be good for skin allergies) yet this isn't really going to ellminate the problem is it! Any ideas on what type of food he should be eating? he's had eagle pack and eukanuba.. no difference there with the allergies...

  2. #2

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    Sorry Nat, i will reply to this in full later but re the tummy upset... as buddy has been on antibiotics it is most likely the the good/bad bacteria levels in his gut are a bit off (Just like people when they take antibiotics) my vet gave me some little sachets of proboitic powder to add to Leos food after his antibiotics were finished and i did use it, i wasnt sure if it made a difference but Leo didnt suffer any tummy upset or anything at all so Im guessing it helped. You could ask your vet, i dont think it would be very expensive (Our vet gave to us for free with the antibiotics) or otherwise I think I may still have a few spare sachets if you want me to check/send?

    I have also heard of people giving Yakult, the pro-biotic drink you buy in the super market but never tried myself. (Google "yakult for dogs?" and you should see some other peoples different stories/advise ect, i actually found one in particular that relates but will PM to you)


    If he isnt any better in the next day or 2 i would be speaking/visiting with your vet, as could be a clue to another under lining problem

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
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    Thanks for your response.. perhaps the yakult would be a good idea.. I shall google and see what comes up! I'll see how he goes tonight / tommorrow.. its nothing really extreme and he seems happy / healthy / eating etc... hopefully its nothing major

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I feed my dog a couple of spoonfuls of regular plain yogurt - it also has the good tummy bacteria. Yes, antibiotics can cause major tummy upset. Pay attention to the name / active ingredient of this one and maybe ask if you can try a different antibiotic next time - as like with humans - can be allergic to the specific antibiotic.

    If dog wasn't on medication and got a dose of the runs - I'd be looking for any supplementary eating that might have been snuck in. My dog's faves - toilet paper rolls, dirt and/or blood and bone fertilizer, lawn clippings and/or compost, roast chicken with skin and fat, bbq fat tossed behind the footy clubrooms, balloons, rubber bands, possum poo, cat poo, something unknown (wandering dew? creeper plant) at my brother's place, and so on.

    For this kind of cause - vet and AWL recommend a fast (no food) of 12 hours for a puppy, and 24 hours for a full grown dog, and then go back on a diet of boiled rice and boiled chicken fillet - slowly building back to normal diet. So long as dog seems otherwise happy and enthusiastic about life and food. If dog seems miserable and disinterested in everything - it's off to the vet we go. Sigh.

    Aloe vera cactus juice good for skin itchies. Cool and soothing and tastes horrid (discourages further chewing). Get an aloe vera from local garden shop and cut a piece off, slice the thorns off if any, and split open, and rub gooey bit on rash. Or you can roll the jelly out of the "leaf" with a glass jar or rolling pin and rub that on.

  5. #5

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    Hi Nat

    hows Buddy doing, have the runs slowed down ???

    Remember last week we were chatting about fish oils, did you try him on any yet? i'm just wondering if you did & did you add oil slowly into he's diet & if its the fish oil that's giving Buddy the runs.

    As for allergies it can be a million of things causing him to have allergy, i don't mean to sound insulting etc, but dry dog food is full of artificial food dyes, flavorings additives etc that can cause skin allergies. Maybe try to wean buddy onto a raw or cooked meat diet only & see how he's allergy goes, cant do any harm in trying something new hey

  6. #6

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    Yes, wanted to get back re the allergies. A common complain it seems with staffys. Like AF said it could be a million things, alot of common allergenes include corn, beef, wheat or grain, grass, pollen, but the list goes on and on. Maybe read up on and speak to your vet regarding an elimination diet to see if it is food relation, otherwise you can also do further testing through your vet/specalist for more enviromental type allergys such as grass/pollen and alike. I wanted to add more info but it is honestly such a huge subject that is well worth reading around on info for yourself, as they're are so many other pet owners who's animals suffer for such complains as well

  7. #7
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    hello, Buddy's 'do's' are looking better today, slightly sloppy but getting firm (gross!!). Aussie Flloyd - haven't tried him on the fish oil capsules yet (although still feeding him sardines in oil) I have them on the shopping list to get tonight! Not sure which section to look for them in though - health food section??

    As for the food allergies - I've tried giving him raw things before and he's just not interested! it usually has to be cooked before he'll eat it.. otherwise it just has to be the dried food and sardines. I keep trying new brands from the pet barn (I look closely at the ingredients) and nothing seems to work. I'm pretty sure it would just be air based allergens (grass / pollen) etc. I think for his sanity (and ours!) we are going to have to take him to the skin specialist as our vet suggested, but they said it could take up to a year for it to stop altogether / find the cause / cure etc...

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    There are major misconceptions in relation to common allergens in dogs, and in particular, dietary related allergies. Contrary to popular belief, kibble is not a common allergen.

    The most common allergens in canine diets are usually always protein based. Chicken and beef top the list. The greater majority of kibble contain chicken products and beef products.

    There are usually many clues to help you nail down what the allergen might possibly be, but unless tests are conducted you will never know.

    As a guide:
    *Diet related allergies usually affect different areas over the body, particularly the chest and are usually always associated with ear complaints.
    * Flea allergies occur on the back of the dog near the hindquarters and above the tail base.
    *Atopic conditions (dust mites, grass, things in the environment) usually show underneath the dog and in the armpits and tops of the paws and down the legs.
    *Contact allergens usually show on the pads of the feet and abdomen/chest

    Often, it is a combination of several allergens.

    To determine if it is a diet related allergy the dog should undergo an elimination diet. This is where a protein source that the dog has never had before is fed and a carbohysdrate for for anywhere from 4 - 12 weeks. They must not have anything else apart from the same protein source and the same carb for that entire time.

    If the allergy clears then it is thought to be diet related. You then ad the normal diet back in one item at a time to see what the dog reacts to.

    If the allergy clears a little, but not entirely, it can be assumed that it is possibly both atopic and diet related.

    If it doesn't clear at all it is an indicator that it is atopic only.

    Edited to add - cooked or uncooked food makes no difference to allergies unless you add ingredients to the cooked meal such as oils, spices etc.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #9

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    Thats a very interesting and informative post Anne, specially your guide/clue's, and actually thinking about it I have actually noticed the same, just never sat down to put it all together and make sense of it in such a way.

    Thanks Anne (Love learning new things!)

  10. #10
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    Jul 2009
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    Newtown, NSW
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    Thanks for the advice Anne, sounds like Buddy's issues are the grass allergies etc as his itches are underneath his arm and legs (leg pits!? he he)

    Wow, I didn't know that chicken was a high allergy food - I feed him mostly chicken based food! Will have to change that

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