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Thread: When is the BEST Time to Have Your Dog De-sexed?

  1. #1

    Default When is the BEST Time to Have Your Dog De-sexed?

    I was just wondering when the best time to de-sex a dog is? I have been told a few different answers to this question and was curious whether anyone on here could perhaps tell me if there is in fact a better time to do this than others. I have been told by the vet than at six months of age is appropriate, before a bitches first season......and told by a breeder that after the second season, or when the dog has reached maturity. Also is it better to wait till after a season or do it before a season.
    The reason I ask, is Paw-Sha will be going into her third season November/December 2009. I am going to have her de-sexed but am not sure if I should wait till after she has her season or just do it now. If anyone knows the answer to this question I would love to hear from you!
    Kind regards,
    Christy.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Victoria
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    Hi Pawsha, Don't have your bitch speyed while she is in season. It is safer and better to wait until she is out of season by at least a month. Speying during a season is very risky to her health.
    To answer your other questions, most consider the best time is around six months of age and before the first season. I suppose it comes down to personal choice but for me and IF I am going have my bitch speyed, I always wait until she at least has had her first season. The reason being a bitch's season signals she has finished growing(physical maturity).

    The one thing I find disgraceful in regard to what age to desex , are those who advocate six to eight weeks of age. Disgusting practice in my honest opinion !

  3. #3

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    Thanks for all your great advice DogSavvy! I really apreciate it.....Cheers Christy/Paw-Sha

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I advocate 6 - 8 weeks of age for all rescue puppies. Disgusting or not, it helps stop the cycle of welfare puppies.

    I agree with the most part with what Dogsavvy has said though.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Hi Paw-Sha,

    I think you should do it now..before her 3rd season

    I got Candy done at 6 months..before she went into season. I posted a similar question here last yr as I didn't know if I should leave Candy untill she was 12 months...or get her done at 6 months before she went into season.
    I chose the 6 months option as I didn't want to risk male dogs getting to her...I have good fences...but not that good...lol
    You are sure you don't want pup's, so nows the best time

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    I advocate 6 - 8 weeks of age for all rescue puppies. Disgusting or not, it helps stop the cycle of welfare puppies.

    I agree with the most part with what Dogsavvy has said though.
    I agree...it may be too young, but there is too many irrisponsible owners out there who get a puppy, then don't desex...then comes all the unwanted litters that are left for the rescue ppl to deal with. To prevent all these dogs being dumped...it needs to be done at a young age.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    I advocate 6 - 8 weeks of age for all rescue puppies. Disgusting or not, it helps stop the cycle of welfare puppies.
    Do you really believe that Anne? I'm afraid I don't any more.

    As you know I started in welfare a long time ago, working weekends and school holidays at an Animal Refuge back in 1967. I believe it was the first shelter in Vic to bring in a desexing policy, long before the two big ones even thought about it. In the 1970's when the AVA finally started to cooperate and other shelters bought in desexing policies, I really believed the problem of unwanted dogs and cats was well on the way to being solved.

    Nearly 40 years later I don't think the situation has improved at all. If anything it is worse. Blanket desexing has not solved the problem at all.

    Juvenile desexing is done because shelters and some breeders don't trust buyers to desex their pets at the correct time. If they have so little faith in a pup's new owner then perhaps they should not sell the animal to them at all.

    Getting back to the original question. With my own dogs I don't spay until after the first season. Midway between seasons is the ideal time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I don't believe that desexing will stop the flow of unwanted dogs and cats in rescues, pounds and shelters though Anne, however I do think it will slow it. Even stopping 1 dog from the welfare fate is better than none.

    I believe there are many issues that need to be dealt with in order to stop the flow of dogs into pounds and then to stop the euthanasia rates which is yet another facet of the welfare system.

    We need education and the enforcement of local government regulations and we need pounds and shelters to stop the unneccessary killing and to stop being the killing machine of our dogs.

    I also don't believe we have an oversupply problem but that's another dicussion.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    I have a pound puppy and she was desexed at 8 weeks. I think they did keyhole surgery but maybe I am just being optimistic - anyway the hole and the scar were very small (as was my puppy).

    I can understand them wanting to do it ASAP and I can understand them not relying on the promises of people who come to get a pound puppy. All the time they get dogs back because the owners couldn't handle the needs of their new pet and frequently it is the owners fault. And I myself have some very disorganised moments, you should see the weeds in the back yard - so I could easily procrastinate about desexing. Or at least imagine someone else doing it. Then again - I'm very careful about vaccinations and worming and de-fleaing.

  10. #10

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    I don't desex early but that is for other reasons - dogs being assessd when they are older as to whether they will be shown/bred etc is part of it.

    My thoughts on early desexing stem from what I've seen in other domestic animals. Yes early desexing results in a slightly different growth rate and final look, and can effect coat (ie desexed dog grow more).

    But if you look at horses or cattle, in which obviously only males are desexed - those desexed young are more stable in temperament, have a larger frame and can be heavier but lack masculine details - big neck muscles etc. They can and do often live longer more relaxed lives. Those desexed later, like mature stallions or bulls being castrated, can never lose certain behaviours which aren't always desirable. I know they're not dogs, but they are mammals...

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