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Thread: Amoxyclav price!!

  1. #11
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    Ring five different vets and get five different prices for a C5 vaccination...at least Ned Kelly wore a mask when he was robbing people.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  2. #12
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    Ring five different vets and get five different prices for a C5 vaccination
    I'd call it robbery if the five different vets were all in the same practice with the same costs... but you could ring five vets and ask them what their monthly running costs are - and get five different answers... ie rent / rates, electricity, water, franchise costs (green cr oss), staff costs (do they have a lot of staff or not many), running a pet surgery or not, being open after normal work hours or on weekends (staff costs)...

    So when you've done that assessment - then you can tell me that all vets should charge the same.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    Plenty of people spend 4 years at least at uni so I don't accept that as an excuse but on the whole you do raise many good valid points.

    I'd just say there are some good vets out there but at least in my area, they seem to be few and far between. More rip off vets who don't seem to care about the animal, just how many times they can get you back through the door for as many treatments as possible, most of which are unnecessary.

    I didnt say it was an excuse, I said it was part of the reason. I spent 5 years at uni myself and fortunately went in a time just before education costs or I would probably still be paying it off. I myself have worked years as a consultant with clients and they wrung their ounce of blood out of you that was for sure, even early Sunday mornings wanting advice. You had to have offices, receptionists, late model 4WDS, satellite phones and the travel was extreme, so car turnover and fuel costs were large. I dont think I got to eat before 10 pm at night in the busy season. There are lean years as you build up your cliet base often hard fought.

    Many small business people will go for years without holidays when building up their practices. I have known quite a few newly qualified people simply go to the mines for a number of years during the booms and earn 3 or 4 times more than they would earn in their profession so they had a chance of setting themselves up. Many a farmer has done the same during the tough drought and low price years just to survive and people want extra cheap milk and food etc, not realising that it is unsustainable.

    There are lawyers, doctors, accountants, dentists etc all who charge heavily for their services. Trades people appear to charge like wounded bulls too, but when you look at what it costs to get yourself qualified and borrow to set up a business and hire staff and buy equipment insurance etc. So vets are not the only ones. Can you imagine what a doctor or surgeon might charge if the health system wasnt subsidised and everyone contributes in some way.

    I guess I have mainly dealt with good vets all though for sure the bad ones are also there. I find more doctors that couldnt really care less and dont even know your name or remember that they sent you of for an x-ray the week before, and heaven help if you want to discuss more than one issue per consult. Again there are some fantastic ones but they are like gold.

    However there is simply a real cost and untill you know what they are it is hard to say that these people are ripping us off. Maybe some are, maybe they are not.

    The issue of uncaring vets, doctors etc is another problem, and often they are simply employed by a practice or locuming and on wages. In some areas it is difficult to fill positions.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 05-19-2015 at 01:18 AM.

  4. #14
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    Can't say I've ever seen a poor vet.

    These days many people accept being ripped off as part of life...look at banks...electricity...gas...car servicing and of cause big overseas companies who even avoid paying their share of tax and this is only the tip of the iceberg.

    Think thats bad...wait till you get connected to the NBN and see what a ripoff that is.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    Can't say I've ever seen a poor vet.

    These days many people accept being ripped off as part of life...look at banks...electricity...gas...car servicing and of cause big overseas companies who even avoid paying their share of tax and this is only the tip of the iceberg.

    Think thats bad...wait till you get connected to the NBN and see what a ripoff that is.
    We live in a country where a certain standard of wages and living is expected and we have to pay for that one way or another.

    As to NBN not a chance out here, I sometimes battle to get a satellite for several hours and I pay the same price per month for 1000MB that my mother in the city pays for 6000MB! Unlimited downloads forget it and even if it was possible it takes ages to down load several minutes of stop start video. I can get mobile reception only in the lounge room and in some parts of my farm. It is still the dark ages out here so I dont even begin to concern myself with NBN or even what the hell it is lol.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    If you took your dog to an emergency vet hospital because your dog had collapsed and the best thing you could think of was maybe he'd been tagged by a snake(no symptoms, just a collapse), you arrive at the emergency vet hospital, they take your dog into ICU, and come back out nearly 1 hour later saying "your dog is showing some signs of snake bite but not all, however in our experience dogs can just drop without warning, would you like to do a snake bite detection kit?" My question was "how much?" the response "$350". Yep ok do it. Now all of us here know that your wouldn't waste an hour before doing that test if the vet had any inclination that the dog had in fact been bitten by a snake(I know a lot more now than I did back then) - I did ask what the likely cost would be if he did need antivenom and I was told between $800 and $1000. That was "milk him no.1". From there we moved on to them coming back the best part of an hour later to tell me that the venom detection kit was clear, but they wanted to keep him overnight just to make sure he would be ok.(Attempted milking no. 2.) Me "Cost?" $1200!

    Put all that into perspective, and the vets knew pretty much straight up that they weren't dealing with a snake bite and they actually failed to diagnose the actual problem, being a heart murmur which one wouldn't think was that hard to find, especially given the bill I had to pay.

    It only gets worse from there ..........
    Not disputing there are some bad vets and incompetant diagnoses. Guess I am lucky to have a really competent specialist vet in the family albeit at a distance location wise who I can get the inside information from if I am not satisfied that has been a bit of a buffer over the years and any serious situations were sorted by who I knew to be thoroughly competent vets. I have only had one situation where at a distance the treating vet refused to be guided by the recommendations of my family specialist, ego got in the way with catastrophic consquences so I get where you are coming from.

    However the costs of vet practices are often very high regardless of the quality of the service. One just has to try and find the competant vets. It is the same with doctors.

  7. #17
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    Can't say I've ever seen a poor vet.
    I meet them on a regular basis at agility competitions. The ones who have recently graduated (since HECS was introduced) and can't afford to set up their own practice.

    Even the "wealthy" ones have such a high burn rate of cash they have to be super careful with their money.

    And there is a sort of diagnosis bias - ie that vets (and GPs) are more likely to "diagnose" something they know than check all the problems. So one good question to ask besides how much $ - is "what else could it be?"

    The trouble with snake bite - is you don't always get a lot of time to diagnose. Tho how they could mistake heart murmur for snake bite- I don't know. Must have been really bad heart murmur and if it's that bad - it would look like collapse and die heart failure - which isn't that easy to treat or cure either.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 05-22-2015 at 11:04 AM.

  8. #18
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    O
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I meet them on a regular basis at agility competitions. The ones who have recently graduated (since HECS was introduced) and can't afford to set up their own practice.

    Even the "wealthy" ones have such a high burn rate of cash they have to be super careful with their money.

    And there is a sort of diagnosis bias - ie that vets (and GPs) are more likely to "diagnose" something they know than check all the problems. So one good question to ask besides how much $ - is "what else could it be?"

    The trouble with snake bite - is you don't always get a lot of time to diagnose. Tho how they could mistake heart murmur for snake bite- I don't know. Must have been really bad heart murmur and if it's that bad - it would look like collapse and die heart failure - which isn't that easy to treat or cure either.
    Yes indeed, most vets are employed in other peoples practices, these are the ones I mostly know and they are definitely not wealthy. Quite a lot are women who work part time to supplement the family income, others are often locums. One friend who built up his own practice from scratch lived in a modest rental for many years until his practice became well established. He and his wife put in a lot of hardworking years to get it established and the huge borrowings paid off before they even considered buying their own house.
    Another friend of mine has a little mobile vet service in the country. She and her husband have been hand building their own house for the last 7 years on a natural bush block using resources from their block.
    I don't think any of them are poor but they are certainly not super wealthy.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 05-22-2015 at 01:54 PM.

  9. #19
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    I understand that there are good vets and bad vets - a good vet is invaluable! I think when it comes to bad vets, it's a case of their hearts not being in it anymore, not a case of their hearts never being in it. Vets do not spend 5 (not 4) years at uni just so they can get a good paying job, their heart must be in it, otherwise they're better off becoming a doctor, dentist, engineer etc - all better paying jobs and some less time at uni! I have shared exam rooms with vet students also doing exams - I can't even count how many vet students I have seen run out of exam rooms, halfway through the exam, in tears and not return - it is extremely difficult and stressful. Costs are very different also, I have completed a 5yr uni degree with costs of $8000 year, I am now completing a different degree for $23,000 a YEAR. Costs vary very significantly. Nobody could ever pay me enough to become a vet.

    I am happy to pay a vet whatever they ask in order for them to make my pet happy and healthy again, they essentially save my babies lives and for that, I can never thank them enough. When our boy Tonka passed away a few months ago (after I took him to an emergency vet on a Sunday and they did some awful things), my regular vet was amazing - she stayed up with him until after midnight trying to make him better and after he passed, they organized his cremation for me, sent me flowers and handwritten cards, follow up phone calls and not once even mentioned his bill - they let me take my time to grieve before even thinking of paying.
    At the moment, one of our cats is extremely sick and my vet is again, absolutely wonderful! He has a bit of a *mystery illness*, where he can be totally fine, then struggle to breathe/cough/choke for a minute, and then be fine again. She has given me her personal number (she works at one of the green+ clinics that Hya mentioned) so I can call her at any point. She even texted me at 2am Sunday morning with some of the research she had been doing and some of the possibilities that it could be - that means she was awake at 2am, doing work related research - For things like that, she is completely invaluable.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy.Maree View Post
    I understand that there are good vets and bad vets - a good vet is invaluable! I think when it comes to bad vets, it's a case of their hearts not being in it anymore, not a case of their hearts never being in it. Vets do not spend 5 (not 4) years at uni just so they can get a good paying job, their heart must be in it, otherwise they're better off becoming a doctor, dentist, engineer etc - all better paying jobs and some less time at uni! I have shared exam rooms with vet students also doing exams - I can't even count how many vet students I have seen run out of exam rooms, halfway through the exam, in tears and not return - it is extremely difficult and stressful. Costs are very different also, I have completed a 5yr uni degree with costs of $8000 year, I am now completing a different degree for $23,000 a YEAR. Costs vary very significantly. Nobody could ever pay me enough to become a vet.

    I am happy to pay a vet whatever they ask in order for them to make my pet happy and healthy again, they essentially save my babies lives and for that, I can never thank them enough. When our boy Tonka passed away a few months ago (after I took him to an emergency vet on a Sunday and they did some awful things), my regular vet was amazing - she stayed up with him until after midnight trying to make him better and after he passed, they organized his cremation for me, sent me flowers and handwritten cards, follow up phone calls and not once even mentioned his bill - they let me take my time to grieve before even thinking of paying.
    At the moment, one of our cats is extremely sick and my vet is again, absolutely wonderful! He has a bit of a *mystery illness*, where he can be totally fine, then struggle to breathe/cough/choke for a minute, and then be fine again. She has given me her personal number (she works at one of the green+ clinics that Hya mentioned) so I can call her at any point. She even texted me at 2am Sunday morning with some of the research she had been doing and some of the possibilities that it could be - that means she was awake at 2am, doing work related research - For things like that, she is completely invaluable.
    Doctors do 6 years and dentists 5 years from memory, doctors also have to do a lot of training at different practices during their degree so it would be more intense than a vet degree but they are all pretty full on uni courses that is for sure.

    Yes when my dog was diagnosed with a very quick onset pleural effusion I was waiting for lab results which take awhile longer because of distance. I spoke to a specialist in the family about the prognosis and she told me it was most likely a cancer. Because my old dog was suffering was deciding if I should let her go before the tests came back confirming cancer. When I took her in the next day the 2 vets in the local practice had been looking up everything they could the evening before to help me with my decision and had come to the same conclusion as the specialist I had spoken to the day before which helped in my decision to let my beautiful girl go. The test eventually came back confirming cancer.

    It was really good of the vets to spemd an evening reading and discussing the case so they could help me and my dog and they contacted me immediately the results came in a couple of hours later confirming that the right decision had been made. Showed me that they definitely understood and cared.

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