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Thread: Cancer trials in NSW

  1. Default Cancer trials in NSW

    There are three different trials in NSW for dogs with cancer.

    The trials are for lymphoma, osteosarcoma, soft tissue sarcoma and melanoma

    Research NSW
    http://www.caninecancer.org.au
    Dedicated To Canine Cancer Awareness

  2. #2
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    What about Hemangiosarcoma...the biggest killer of GSDs.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  3. Default

    There is something coming for haemangiosarcoma. There is a process for the oncologists prior to being able to have trials. Lots of paperwork etc for them to go through prior to being able to launch a trial. I will be putting it up on my website once the material is at hand.

    As far as what you can do now for the GSD. If you have a healthy dog over 7 who has never had cancer, cheek swabs are needed to study the DNA. If you have a GSD with either haemangiosarcoma or melanoma a cheek swab is needed from these dogs no matter what age they are.

    If you have surgery to remove a tumour and tissue can be taken at the time from the tumour this is the "Gold" sample and gives the best DNA. If your dog is having surgery the vet needs to take a sample, put it in the freezer and if the pathology comes back as haemangiosarcoma or melanoma you can request a preservative called Qiazol from the UK and they will send it to your vet. Once he/she receive they get the tumour sample out of the freezer and put into the preservative. A copy of the pathology report goes back with the sample and the owner consent form. The owner consent form MUST be signed PRIOR to your dog having surgery.

    The information is available here United Kingdom

    For every sample the AHT receive it is one step closer to a cure. The more dog owners we can get involved the better.
    http://www.caninecancer.org.au
    Dedicated To Canine Cancer Awareness

  4. #4
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    Not in the least interested in putting a loved pet through chemo for cancer after having it myself and knowing the range of side effects and severity they can have. Your argument in another forum re them having a lesser dose so lesser side effects does not hold water as chemo is based on weight so they would be getting the same kind of dose. They can not communicate what they are feeling and I feel this comes into the realm of owners selfishly wanting their pet to be alive despite quality of life and suffering.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  5. Default

    Like you I have also heard of very negative stories with dogs on chemo. This is why I ask people what tests they had done for diagnosis and if they used an oncologist.

    My boy Frodo had no side effects at all and it was business as usual. He had 4.5yrs extra and he was a happy boy infact once of the happiest dogs I have ever come across. The vinca poisoned him at Easter sadly and it broke my heart.

    Here are some pics of Frodo many of them taken whilst he was on Chemo playing with his mates as he loved other dogs. Vinca
    http://www.caninecancer.org.au
    Dedicated To Canine Cancer Awareness

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by frodofromaus View Post
    There is something coming for haemangiosarcoma. There is a process for the oncologists prior to being able to have trials. Lots of paperwork etc for them to go through prior to being able to launch a trial. I will be putting it up on my website once the material is at hand.

    As far as what you can do now for the GSD. If you have a healthy dog over 7 who has never had cancer, cheek swabs are needed to study the DNA. If you have a GSD with either haemangiosarcoma or melanoma a cheek swab is needed from these dogs no matter what age they are.

    If you have surgery to remove a tumour and tissue can be taken at the time from the tumour this is the "Gold" sample and gives the best DNA. If your dog is having surgery the vet needs to take a sample, put it in the freezer and if the pathology comes back as haemangiosarcoma or melanoma you can request a preservative called Qiazol from the UK and they will send it to your vet. Once he/she receive they get the tumour sample out of the freezer and put into the preservative. A copy of the pathology report goes back with the sample and the owner consent form. The owner consent form MUST be signed PRIOR to your dog having surgery.

    The information is available here United Kingdom

    For every sample the AHT receive it is one step closer to a cure. The more dog owners we can get involved the better.
    Hemangiosarcoma is a very aggressive cancer...no time for paper work...swabs...Qiazol or pathology either because there are no symptoms with this cancer until it's too late...surgery only delays the death of the poor dog.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    Not in the least interested in putting a loved pet through chemo for cancer after having it myself and knowing the range of side effects and severity they can have. Your argument in another forum re them having a lesser dose so lesser side effects does not hold water as chemo is based on weight so they would be getting the same kind of dose. They can not communicate what they are feeling and I feel this comes into the realm of owners selfishly wanting their pet to be alive despite quality of life and suffering.
    I have mixed feelings about this. I have known several younger dogs with lymphoma who have had a very good quality of life on chemo. They were performance dogs and it never seemed to affect them at all, they still ran and jumped with great joy, both had significant remissions. I think though once it is obvious that chemo is not working and there are side effects that I would not persist.

    My old dog also got cancer and by the time I realised I knew it was too late and chemo would be a nightmare. I preferred to let her go as I could not bare to see her suffer one minute longer than neccessary.

    My mothers dog had a soft tissue sarcoma which they removed from her leg. They put her on an oral dose of chemo and she seemed perfectly normal. They had to fiddle with the dose to get right, she was seeing an oncologist, but once they got it right she lived another 2 years untill she died of old age at 16. Her apetite was good and she certainly didnt give any indications that she was suffering, in fact she was quite lively for an old gal. When she got really old my mother decided to take her off chemo for the last few months of her life as she started to notice changes in her dogs quality of life which she didnt know if they were related to the chemo, the cancer or old age.

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    Hemangiosarcoma is a very aggressive cancer...no time for paper work...swabs...Qiazol or pathology either because there are no symptoms with this cancer until it's too late...surgery only delays the death of the poor dog.
    There are 3 types of haemangiosarcoma. Dermal, sub curtaneous and visceral. The one you are referring to is visceral which in the GSD often affects the spleen. The course of treatment is normally the removal of the spleen as it does come on very quickly and without much clinical sign. Perhaps if the spleen is removed a sample could go to the AHT? If there was time (which may not be the case if it was affecting the spleen) a cheek swab kit takes about ten days to get to Aus. Its an awful thing to think about but sometimes it is better to knw all of this prior to this occuring. One would hope it never ever happens to any dog but sadly it does and we do want to stop this disease. I had first hand experience with a friends GSD with splenic haemangiosarcoma and it broke my heart. He was a dog owner who should never have been allowed to keep a toad. His poor girl was in hospital and he left me to sort it and he was too busy to take my calls when it was an emergency. He kept saying I am busy I will call you about iit alter and decisions had to be made. He said he was too busy to come see her Just horrible and fortunately the vet stepped in so the dog didnt suffer.

    A friend had a dog with soft tissue sarcoma and used and oncologist. The course of treatment option offered was Metronomic Chemotherapy at home. It was very low doses of chemo on a daily basis and this often gives good qualitity of life and does extend life. In this dogs case he had STS in his front right leg and a first surgery did not get enough clean margin. The other option of amputation was not feasible due to arthritis in both back legs. The STS was going well for nine months with no sign of recurrence and nine months later he got osteosarcoma in his left front leg. It was the osteosarcoma that got him in the end. He had a good quality of life for a reasonable period and once it stopped being that the owner put him to sleep so he had no suffering

    i think if chemo does give your dog a bad quality of life or they get sick you always have the option of stopping it. Oncologists have many different mixes up their sleeve to treat cancerr and chemo is only one of them. We will soon be hearing more on immunology for cancer. There is vocus both overseas and in Australia in this area as treatment possibilities for the future.
    http://www.caninecancer.org.au
    Dedicated To Canine Cancer Awareness

  9. #9
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    No need to tell me what Hemangiosarcoma is as I lost my beautiful GSD Tara (8 yrs) to this very nasty cancer a little over three years ago.

    I was given two options...an operation (spleen) which may give her a few more months or put her to sleep...I put her to sleep because I didn't want to put her through all that only to lose her in a few months time...I had to think of her not me.

    I'm sure if I had gone with an operation some oncologist would have extracted a few thousand out of me in those last few months and I would have ended up with the same result as others have found out.

    The vet told me this cancer is always fatal and could be another 20 years before the gene responsible is found and there are no tests for it...he said one way was after the GSD turned 5 yrs to have an ultrasound every month for the rest of the dogs life in the hope of catching the cancer early...which he said was impossible anyway.

    I hope some day a cure is found for this cancer and squamous cell carcinoma which claimed our beautiful Rottie some 18 mths ago.
    Last edited by Dogman; 01-05-2015 at 07:19 PM.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  10. Default

    I am so sorry you lost both your bacies. Cancer is such a horrible disease and it claims so many of our beloved dogs.

    I am sure you made the best decision for your dogs. Some people choose to have the spleen removed others dont. It is always a hard decision and of course it is the quality of life that counts. Having the spleen removed is normally followed up with chemotherapy. From where I sit so long as people know their options they can make informed decisions as to what they think is best for their dog. Unfortunately there is a lot of mis information around as well and this is what makes it so hard for dog owners at times. The field of cancer and what the options are is changing so rapidly with new treatments and it is hard for even the oncologists to stay on top of it all. There is no possible way the primary vet could keep on top of the field of cancer as they have just so many things they have to know about. The primary vet is an encyclopedia of knowledge across the board. Specialists for both dogs and human do just that they specialise and as such we expect them to be up on the latest treatments.

    The AHT is looking at DNA into various cancers and this is why they have chosen certain breeds for certain cancers. Without samples scientists will never find the answers. I have talked to countless scientists around the world for the website and each and every one of them has told me it is getting the samples that they need which holds up finding treatments and cures. One reason I became involved with the AHT is because what they are asking for ie blood samples, tissue samples and cheek swabs are not going to harm any dog in the process of collection. The blood is normally left over from the operation and the tissue sample is a slither taken from the tumour when it is removed. Dr Mike Starkey is Head of Molecular Oncology and over the last couple of years has given me a lot of his time to learn what they are trying to do, what they need, how they intend to achieve it etc. I am just facilitating dog owners with the information that they can help.

    How long until cures? Who knows but the treatments are becoming better all the time. I hope that in my lifetime cancer in our pets is a disease that is something that is easily treatable and dogs dont die from it.
    http://www.caninecancer.org.au
    Dedicated To Canine Cancer Awareness

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