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Thread: Nero is limping :(

  1. #41
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    Well, I can't lock him up for six weeks in a tiny crate. I can only imagine the kind of permanent psychological trauma this would cause I also think he'd probably be in a lot of pain immediately after surgery. So he'll need a bit of room to move about and change position to be comfortable, no? The leaflet my vet gave me says about the first 6 weeks post surgery:

    '...the dog should be confined to a small room or run for the duration of this period. The only exercise allowed is short duration (10 mins max) slow walks on a leash for toileting purposes." No walking up and down flights of stairs, jumping or any uncontrolled activity.

    So I discussed with my vet that he can stay with me in the office during the day. I work from home in a far too small (3x3) office and will remove anything that could be tempting to jump up. The room has a ceiling to floor window so he can at least see what's going on outside. And a cave (my desk) to hide. When I'm not at home he'll have to stay in the laundry by himself tough.

    Riley thanks for the links to the puppy runs. I'll definitely get one of those. They'd be a great idea to put up on the deck in front of my window for sunny days. He does like to sunbake.

  2. #42
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    I went through the TPLO with my dog which like the surgery you are having done involves a bone being broken and screw and plates. I did use a crate the second time round, first time round she was in the laundry when I wasn't around. You do have to be super careful because any slip can cause all sorts of problems and infection is always a risk in the joint and bone. It was nerve wracking and second time round the crate was good for at least the first few weeks. She loved a bone and I had her right next to me in her crate when I was home. She didn't suffer any psychological trauma but she was very glad when she was allowed to start going for short walks. She was pretty over the whole crate thing.

    I left my kelpie in the bathroom after being spayed while I was a t work and when I came home she had leapt 6 ft up at the window and ripped the net curtains off. Just make sure your boy can't get in to any trouble when you leave him.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    Well, I can't lock him up for six weeks in a tiny crate. I can only imagine the kind of permanent psychological trauma this would cause I also think he'd probably be in a lot of pain immediately after surgery. So he'll need a bit of room to move about and change position to be comfortable, no? The leaflet my vet gave me says about the first 6 weeks post surgery:

    '...the dog should be confined to a small room or run for the duration of this period. The only exercise allowed is short duration (10 mins max) slow walks on a leash for toileting purposes." No walking up and down flights of stairs, jumping or any uncontrolled activity.

    So I discussed with my vet that he can stay with me in the office during the day. I work from home in a far too small (3x3) office and will remove anything that could be tempting to jump up. The room has a ceiling to floor window so he can at least see what's going on outside. And a cave (my desk) to hide. When I'm not at home he'll have to stay in the laundry by himself tough.

    Riley thanks for the links to the puppy runs. I'll definitely get one of those. They'd be a great idea to put up on the deck in front of my window for sunny days. He does like to sunbake.
    Seriously? 6 weeks of downtime in a crate is going to create permanent psychological trauma?
    Last edited by mymatejack; 09-21-2015 at 02:07 AM.

  4. #44
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    Well whatever confinement he's in, is going to be a different world for a few weeks, and i wish him a speedy recovery with minimum pain to dog, and owner who suffers when the dog suffers.
    @ Riley: if this dog in case study did well, then i guess its good to go for margoos dog eh < size of crate.
    6 weeks in a crate doesnt sound so bad, if the dog doesnt want to move anyway. But led right by your side, is FAR better! I like the sound of R&R at your feet
    he should heal best in that position by far! I was working, so couldnt.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    Seriously? 6 weeks of downtime in a crate is going to create permanent psychological trauma?
    Trust MMJ to be brutally straight to the point lol. I do tend to agree though. CCL recovery is not something to be taken lightly. I have known several epic failures due to people feeling sorry for their dogs. Amazing how fast a dog can shift if something untoward happens and in the early fragile stages this can be catastrophic. My first time round I got away with some very close calls so second time around it was the crate.

  6. #46

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    ‘margoo’ – Please change your mind about using a crate. A crate will make life a lot easier for you and Nero for his very important healing time.

    He needs complete rest and very restricted movement. If he is at all like my 2 – every move I make – they move. He will be a lot safer in a crate than being loose in a room.

    They are not cruel and cause no problems with pups. In fact most pups love them. They become their cave and quiet place.

    If, as you said that Nero likes sleeping under your desk – then for all intents and purposes – that is very much like a crate !

    You can make them very comfortable with a good quality mattress, sheets/towels/blankets, a pillow and whatever else. Put a sheet over the top to cover 3 sides –then you have a very special ‘dog cave’ !

    There is no evidence to say that crates are cruel to dogs:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...rally+Magazine

    ‘Hyancinth’ has put up a thread on crate training – but here is a link I like. Don’t worry about a clicker – use ‘yes’ as a marker word.

    https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sour...ate%20training

    How to measure the pup and then look at crate sizes for your pup ?

    What Size Dog Crate Should You Get and Which Type Is Best?

    Some more information on crates:

    Dog Crate Buying Guide | eBay

    So once you have measured him up – have a look for a crate here.

    dog crate in Adelaide Region, SA | Gumtree Australia Free Local Classifieds

    Need any more ideas or help – just ask !

  7. #47
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    Well, I can't lock him up for six weeks in a tiny crate.
    It's not going to be continuous, he's going to get regular short walks around the yard. And to start with he's going to be doped up on pain killers anyway.

    And then after a bit you can progress to short walks along the front footpath and then maybe up two or three houses and back...

    You absolutely can keep him confined when you don't have him on lead - unless you want the time and expense of the surgery to be wasted.

    My dog did something icky to her shoulder back in Feb/March. After some discussion with vets and a vet-physio-rehab person... she was on lead any time she was out the house... including toilet stops in the back yard because she had this dangerous habit of charging the back fence where there is a lane, and cats, and magpies and walkers and their dogs. She'd also charge around the house to check both gates with a view to the front footpath...

    Not very good for the injury. She didn't start to get better until I really confined her ability to go charging around. She still has a bit of a niggle there, but she's not lame any more.

    From my experience of having an ACL repair - you get a lot of info on the healing time line. When it's first done, the knee will feel great but that's only because the tendon is newly repaired but this is the most dangerous time for ruining the repair because the actual integration with the existing tissue hasn't started.

    So if your dog launches at something or slips on something, or jumps up... before he's done healing - the whole thing can be back to somewhere behind square one.

  8. #48
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    If it is a TTA they perform an osteotomy to change the geometry of the knee. So in effect they cut the bone. The bone needs 6 weeks to knit and bond back together. There will also be screws and plates to hold the bone. Hence it is really important to allow the bone to heal. It is not quite as radical as the TPLO and the plates and screws are pretty strong but if things go wrong they can go really wrong so be conservative. Your dog will survive the confinement.

  9. #49

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    'margoo' - Interesting articles for you to read regarding keeping Nero quiet after his surgery. Exercising his brain will be just as good as exercise to obtain a tired and contented pup.

    Manners Minder use in rehabilitation | Animal Behavior and Medicine Blog | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS

    Getting Your Dog To Rest After Surgery - Not Always Easy - Whole Dog Journal Article

    https://positively.com/contributors/...after-surgery/

  10. #50
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    And so it begins. Today the patient came home. Yesterday we had a bit of a scare. When OH rang to speak with the surgeon he heard a dog endlessly screaming in pain in the background. The vet confirmed it was Nero who was just waking up and being put on more drugs for the night. He said it was normal for dogs to howl when they come out of their anesthetic. But I was a wreck for the rest of the night anyway and OH could only just stop me from driving there and taking him home. Luckily he had settled and was sleeping when we rang half an hour later again to make sure he was allright.

    Anywho... he is home now. So far only a little bit of whimpering when he moves, which he doesn't do anyway. Since we settled him in his run, he changed position only once. No idea yet how we're going to convince him to go outside to pee tonight... *sigh* I got him a crate but as I thought, it's too small for him at the moment. Even though it's the biggest one I could find... he needs a lot of room to spread out his sore leg... Maybe he'll check it out when he is a bit more mobile. At the moment only Rox is using it.

    sickbed.jpgsickbed2.jpg
    Last edited by margoo; 09-30-2015 at 04:20 PM.

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